International Law: A Treatise, Volumen1

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Longmans, Green, 1905

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Law of Nations never per se Municipal Law
26
Certain Rules of Municipal Law necessitated or interdicted
27
Presumption against conflicts between International and Municipal Law
28
Case of the Franconia
29
Dominion of the Law of Nations 26 Range of Dominion of International Law controversial
30
Three Conditions of Membership of the Family of Nations
31
Present Range of Dominion of the Law of Nations
32
Treatment of States outside the Family of Nations
34
Codification of the Law of Nations
35
Movement in Favour of Codification
36
Work of the Hague Peace Conference
37
U S Naval War Code
38
Merits of Codification in general
39
Merits of Codification of International Law
41
How Codification could be realised
43
CHAPTER II
44
The Jews
45
12
47
The Greeks
48
The Romans
50
No need for a Law of Nations during the Middle Ages
52
The Fifteenth and Sixteenth Century
54
Development of the Law of Nations after Grotius
58
The time of Grotius
59
The period 16481721
60
The period 17211789
62
The period 17891815
63
The period 18151856
65
The period 18561874
68
The period 18741899
70
The Twentieth Century
72
Five Lessons of the History of the Law of Nations
73
15
76
Grotius
77
Zouche
81
The Naturalists
82
The Positivists
83
Basis of the Law of Nations
84
The Grotians
85
Treatises of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
87
The Science of the Law of Nations in the Nineteenth Cen tury as represented by treatises
90
Collection of Treaties
94
Bibliographies 8
95
States the Subjects of the Law of Nations
97
CHAPTER I
99
Real and apparent International Persons gov 999
100
Notfull Sovereign States
101
Divisibility of Sovereignty contested
103
Meaning of Sovereignty in the Eighteenth Century
105
Meaning of Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century
106
Result of the Controversy regarding Sovereignty
108
Mode of Recognition
110
Recognition under Conditions III
112
State Recognition in contradistinction to other Recognitions
113
Changes in the Condition of International Persons
114
Important in contradistinction to Indifferent Changes 04
115
Changes affecting States as International Persons
117
Succession of International Persons 80 Common Doctrine regarding Succession of International Persons
119
How far Succession actually takes place
120
Succession in consequence of Absorption
121
Succession in consequence of Dismemberment
123
Source in Contradistinction to Cause
125
States in Personal Union
126
States in Real Union
127
Confederated States Staatenbund
128
Federal States Bundesstaaten
129
Case of the Danish Fleet
131
The Union between Suzerain and Vassal State
133
International position of Vassal States
135
States under Protectorate 92 Conception of Protectorate
137
International position of States under Protectorate
138
Protectorates outside the Family of Nations
139
Neutralised States
140
Conception of Neutralised States 140 V
141
International position of Neutralised States
142
Switzerland
144
No essential difference between Christian and other States
148
International Persons of the Present
154
Equality Rank and Titles
161
Intervention
181
Intervention de facto a Matter of Policy
187
Territorial Gulfs and Bays
191
Consequences of Intercourse as a presupposition of Inter
193
Internationally injurious Attitudes of Parliaments
208
Internationally injurious Acts of administrative Officials and Military and Naval Forces
209
State Responsibility for Acts of Private Persons 164 Vicarious in contradistinction to Original State Responsi bility for Acts of Private Persons
211
Municipal Law for Offences against Foreign States
212
STATE TERRITORY
217
Territorial Subsoil 223
223
Boundary Waters
224
Lakes and Landlocked Seas
230
The Panama Canal
236
Fisheries Cabotage Police and Maritime Ceremonials within
242
Boundary Mountains
255
Occupation
275
Consequences of Occupation
276
Fisheries in the North
282
Accretion
283
Prescription
293
CHAPTER II
300
The Freedom of the Open
308
Dignity a Quality
311
No Obligation to admit Foreigners
314
Jurisdiction on the Open
315
SECT
318
How Verification of Flag is effected
322
275
328
Practical Expression of claims to Maritime Sovereignty
333
Seal Fisheries in Behring
336
Telegraph Cables in the Open Sea 286 Telegraph Cables in the Open Sea admitted
338
International Protection of Submarine Telegraph Cables
339
CHAPTER III
341
Monarchs
342
Individuals Objects of the Law of Nations
344
Nationality the Link between Individuals and the Law of Nations
345
The Law of Nations and the Rights of Mankind
346
Nationality
348
Conception of Nationality
349
Socalled Protégés and de facto Subjects
350
Nationality and Emigration
352
VOL 1
353
Acquisition of Nationality through Redintegration
354
Acquisition of Nationality through Subjugation and Cession
355
Naturalisation in Especial 303 Conception and Importance of Naturalisation
357
Object of Naturalisation
358
Conditions of Naturalisation
359
Naturalisation in Great Britain
360
Double and Absent Nationality 308 Possibility of Double and Absent Nationality
362
Position of Individuals with Double Nationality
364
How Absent Nationality occurs
365
Position of Individuals destitute of Nationality
366
Position of Foreigners after Reception
372
Expulsion of Foreigners
378
Diplomatic Envoys objects of International
384
Extradition Treaties how arisen
386
Difficulty concerning the Conception of Political Crime
392
Reactionary Extradition Treaties
400
Presidents of Republics
412
Diplomacy
418
Immunity of Domicile
442
Exemption from Criminal and Civil Jurisdiction
445
Exemption from Subpćna as witness
446
Exemption from Police
447
Right of Chapel
448
Selfjurisdiction
449
Possible Cases
450
Envoy found by Belligerents on occupied Enemy Territory
452
The Retinue of Diplomatic Envoys 401 Different Classes of Members of Retinue
453
Privileges of Members of Legation
454
403 Privileges of Private Servants
455
Privileges of Couriers of Envoys
456
Accomplishment of Object of Mission
457
Recall
458
Promotion to a higher Class
459
Constitutional Changes
460
Death of Envoy
461
CHAPTER III
463
General Character of Consuls
465
Declaration of St Petersburg
513
Treaty of Berlin of 1878
553
General Act of the Congo Conference
566
Casus Fćderis
572
Universal Telegraph Union
580
Conventions concerning Private International
586
Zone for Revenue and Sanitary Laws 245
610
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Página 227 - The canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce and of war of all nations observing these Rules, on terms of entire equality, so that there shall be no discrimination against any such nation, or its citizens or subjects, in respect of the conditions or charges of traffic, or otherwise. Such conditions and charges of traffic shall be just and equitable.
Página 179 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been deemed proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power.
Página 227 - It is agreed that the canal may be constructed under the auspices of the Government of the United States, either directly at its own cost, or by gift or loan of money to individuals or corporations, or through subscription to or purchase of stock or shares, and that, subject to the provisions of the present Treaty, the said Government shall have and enjoy the rights incident to such construction, as well as the exclusive right of providing for the regulation and management of the canal.
Página 558 - Convention for the adaptation to maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of August 22, 1864.
Página 36 - Now go and smite Amalek, and utterly destroy all that they have, and spare them not ; but slay both man and woman, infant and suckling, ox and sheep, camel and ass.
Página 560 - If, in the above event, any other Power or Powers should join in hostilities against that ally, the other High Contracting Party will come to its assistance, and will conduct the war in common, and make peace in mutual agreement with it.
Página 227 - No belligerent shall embark or disembark troops, munitions of war, or warlike materials in the canal, except in case of accidental hindrance of the transit, and in such case the transit shall be resumed with all possible dispatch.
Página 59 - that it is an essential principle of the law of nations that no power can liberate itself from the engagements of a treaty, nor modify the stipulations thereof, unless with the consent of the contracting powers, by means of an amicable arrangement.
Página 27 - Convention with Respect to the Laws and Customs of War on Land.

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