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RUTH LEE.

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WRITTEN FOR THE AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION.

BY THE AUTHOR OF “WILD FLOWERS."

Rort Biopecia.

AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION.

PHILADELPHIA:
No. 146 CHESNUT STREET.

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ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.
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1914 L EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the nineteenth day of December, in the fifty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America, A. D. 1828, PAUL BECK, Junior, Treasurer in trust for the American Sunday School Union, of the said District, has deposited in this office

the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

“Ruth Lee. Written for the American Sunday School Union By the Author of “ Wild Flowers." "

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, "An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the cimes: therein mentioned;" And also to the act, ehtitled, "An act supplementary to an act, entitled, “An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Draps, :Ohafts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending *une berfefits thereof

to the Arts of designing, engraving, andetching historical and other prints."

D: CALDWELL,
Clerk of lfcoEastebro District of Pennsyloania.

RUTH LEE.

CHAPTER 1.

On a piece of woodland, which had been cleared at the foot of a mountain, eight log houses had been recently built; in one of these, lived Richard and Jane Lee. Richard was an active young man; he felled more trees, and removed more stumps, than any of the new settlerss-and therefore they told him, that he had the best right to give a name to their town. He said that he always looked twice at a large chesrut-tree,, before he could put his axe irto it, and that if they would consent to let four or five of the largest remain near the settlement, he would name it “Chesnut-town." . All agreed that the chesnut-trees should be left. The trees which grew

between them were cut down, except a few saplings, and one tall cedar,

over which a grape-vine had twined its branches. The underwood was cleared out, and the grassy spot beneath the chesnut-trees, became the play-ground of the merry little children of the new settlement.

The girls gathered acorn cups, and fixed them with pieces of broken plates, to form what they called baby-houses; and the boys got slips of wood and pieces of shingles, which the carpenters had left, and tried to make houses like their own homes. When they were tired of that employment, they swung upon the branches of the old grape-vine. Some of the children were : too small to reach thèo vinė branghes, but the larger ones lifted them, and they.elung with their little hands with a fear of falling, and so could not have much pleasửre; but they wanted to do what the older.boys did, and when they could no longer hold the rough stems, they rubbed their hurt fingers, and tried to look pleased, though they were ready to cry How much wiser it would have been for them to have been satisfied with the kind of play suited to their age: but children, and

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