The American Journal of Psychology, Volumen9

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Granville Stanley Hall, Edward Bradford Titchener, Karl M. Dallenbach, Madison Bentley, Edwin Garrigues Boring, Margaret Floy Washburn
University of Illinois Press, 1898
 

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Página 446 - We must, however, acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system — with all these exalted powers — Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
Página 501 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God.
Página 500 - Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods And mountains, and of all that we behold From this green earth...
Página 132 - Society is making a Collective Investigation of Infantile Scurvy as occurring in North America, and earnestly requests the cooperation of physicians, through their sending of reports of cases, whether these have already been published or not. No case will be used in such a way as to interfere with its subsequent publication by the observer. Blanks containing questions to be filled out will be furnished on application to any one of the committee. A final printed report of the investigation will be...
Página 500 - Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me. I was so distinctly made aware of the presence of something kindred to me, even in scenes which we are accustomed to call wild and dreary, and also that the nearest in blood to me and humanest was not a person nor a villager, that I thought no place could ever be strange to me again.
Página 500 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore. There is society where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not man the less, but nature more...
Página 533 - He has spread more widely than any other highly organized form, and all others have yielded before him. He manifestly owes this immense superiority to his intellectual faculties, to his social habits, which lead him to aid and defend his fellows, and to his corporeal structure. The supreme importance of these characters has been proved by the final arbitrament of the battle for life. Through his powers of intellect, articulate language has been evolved ; and on this his wonderful advancement has...
Página 551 - If no organic being excepting man had possessed any mental power, or if his powers had been of a wholly different nature from those of the lower animals, then we should never have been able to convince ourselves that our high faculties had been gradually developed. But it can be shown that there is no fundamental difference of this kind.
Página 543 - The free expression by outward signs of an emotion intensifies it. On the other hand, the repression, as far as this is possible, of all outward signs softens our emotions. He who gives way to violent gestures will increase his rage ; he who does not control the signs of fear will experience fear in a greater degree ; and he who remains passive when overwhelmed with, grief loses his best chance of recovering elasticity of mind.
Página 38 - the occasion of the ludicrous is the degradation of some person or interest possessing dignity in circumstances that excite no other strong emotion.

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