Theodore Roosevelt in Perspective

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Nova Publishers, 2005 - 158 páginas
President of the United States of America, is an official title sought by many and won by only a few individuals. The series entitled First Men, America's President, contains a book length biography of each 'President of the United States of America'. Every book contains information on the President's early education, professional career, military or political service prior to the presidency, interpretative discussion of both domestic and foreign policies during each presidency, and the conclusion of their political lives in public service. The two major themes of this series are the character traits marking success in the presidency, and the changes in the office of presidents throughout America's history. Character matters in all walks of life, but perhaps matters most within the character of the President of the United States.

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Contenido

Early Life
1
The Political Life
21
National Hero
41
The Presidency
63
Second Term
89
The Last Hurrah
111
The End of a Strenuous Life
127
Aftermath
143
Selected Bibliography
151
Index
155
Derechos de autor

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Página 71 - Chronic wrongdoing, or an impotence which results in a general loosening of the ties of civilized society, may in America, as elsewhere, ultimately require intervention by some civilized nation, and in the Western Hemisphere the adherence of the United States to the Monroe Doctrine may force the United States, however reluctantly, in flagrant cases of such wrongdoing or impotence, to the exercise of an international police power.
Página 54 - I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life, the life of toil and effort, of labor and strife; to preach that highest form of success which comes, not to the man who desires mere easy peace, but to the man who does not shrink from danger, from hardship, or from bitter toil, and who out of these wins the splendid ultimate triumph.
Página ix - Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into actual Service of the United States...
Página x - shall have the power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment." Every president has realized that each must administer through constitutional principles, as each was elected by the voting majority of the people to be their chief executive through the Electoral College. Each president of the United States "shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur."...
Página 55 - If we stand idly by, if we seek merely swollen, slothful ease and ignoble peace, if we shrink from the hard contests where men must win at the hazard of their lives and at the risk of all they hold dear...
Página x - As the president directs both the domestic and foreign activities of the government, he has the power to "nominate and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate.... appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the Supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law.
Página 2 - My father, Theodore Roosevelt, was the best man I ever knew. He combined strength and courage with gentleness, tenderness, and great unselfishness.
Página 71 - We would interfere with them only in the last resort, and then only if it became evident that their inability or unwillingness to do justice at home and abroad had violated the rights of the United States or had invited foreign aggression to the detriment of the entire body of American nations.

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