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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

THE PLAYS EDITED FROM THE FOLIO OF MDCXXIII, WITH VARIOUS

READINGS FROM ALL THE EDITIONS AND ALL THE COMMENTATORS,

NOTES, INTRODUCTORY REMARKS, A HISTORICAL SKETCH OF

THE TEXT, AN ACCOUNT OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF

THE ENGLISH DRAMA, A MEMOIR OF THE POET,

AND AN ESSAY UPON HIS GENIUS

BY RICHARD GRANT WHITE

VOL. VIII.

BOSTON

LITTLE BROWN AND COMPANY

18 63

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859, by

RICHARD GRANT WHITE,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New York

RIVERSIDE, CAMBRIDGE:

PRINTED BY H. 0. HOUGHTON AND COMPANY.

STEREOTYPED AT THE

BOSTON STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY.

THE THIRD PART OF

KING HENRY THE SIXTH,

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“ The True Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants. Printed at London by P. S. for Thomas Millington, and are to be sold at his shoppe vnder Saint Peters Church in Cornwal. 1595." 8vo. 40 leaves.

Reprinted in 1600 for the same bookseller ; and about 1619 for T.[homas] P.[avier], with the First Part of the Contention. See the reverse of the bastard title to the Second Part of Henry VI.

The third Part of Henry the Sixt, with the death of the Duke of Yorke, occupies twenty-six pages in the folio of 1623, viz., from p. 147 to p. 172, inclusive; in the division of Histories, pages 165 and 166 being misprinted 167 and 168, these numbers are twice inserted. It is there divided into Acts and Scenes; but is without a list of Dramatis Personæ, which Rowe supplied.

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KING

HENRY VI. PART III.

INTRODUCTION.

WHEN

HEN the authors of The First Part of the Contention be

twixt the two famous Houses of York and Lancaster completed, in the early version of the following play, their dramatic picture of Henry the Sixth's eventful reign, they did not call the third compartment of their work The Second, or The Last Part of the Contention, but The True Tragedy of Richard Duke of York The reason which has been sought for this disappointment of natural expectation may not improbably be found in the overshadowing importance to which, under the hand of Shakespeare, the character of Richard shot up in the writing of the third part of this “ dramatic trilogy," and in the hatred of the last Yorkist king, which had been grafted on the popular mind, and well nurtured during the reigns of his four successors. The play which was intended to present only a continuation of the struggle between two factions became a historic tragedy, from the dramatis personæ of which stepped forth a hero whose name and whose traditional character were known to every Englishman, and to the representation of which the public could be invited, to feed at once their hatred of a tyrant and their love of those bloody horrors upon the rising degrees of which tyrants of old mounted to their thrones. This, in my judgment, determined (as in a similar case with a shrewd manager it would now determine) the name first given to the Third Part of King Henry the Sixth.

The Essay upon the Authorship of these three plays renders other introductory remark upon this one superfluous, except that the period of its action is from the battle of St. Albans, 1461, to that of Tewksbury, 1471.

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