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pliance with the suggestions of the international sanitary regulations;

(c) A book showing the stock of drugs, wherein shall be inscribed the quantity and kind of the drugs or medicines on board at the moment of sailing from the port of departure, as well as the supplementary acquisitions received at the port of relay;

(d) A record book of medical prescriptions;

(e) A clinic book in which shall be most minutely described all the cases of disease occurring on board and their respective treatment;

(f) A list of passengers giving their name, age, sex, nationality, profession, and place of residence;

(9) A list of the crew; and
(h) A manifest of the cargo.

2. The books referred to in the preceding paragraph shall be opened and signed by the consul of some one of the contracting countries at the port of sailing; and the leaves having reference to each voyage shall be closed by the sanitary authority at the port of destination.

Commanders of vessels will pay no fee whatever for the supply of these books.

3. All the papers on board shall be submitted for inspection to the sanitary authority at the port of destination and to the consular authority at the port of departure, it being the duty of the latter to indicate on the bills of health, when viséd or certified to, the existence or total or partial absence of the books, and the list and roll alluded to in the first paragraph of this article.

4. Vessels of the second class are those which do not possess the requirements stated in the first paragraph of this article.

ARTICLE 9.

The vessels engaged in the transportation of passengers, belonging to any of the contracting countries, are obliged to comply with the conditions of vessels of the first class, and likewise such foreign vessels as may be engaged in the same traffic upon the coasts of the contracting countries.

ARTICLE 10.

All vessels bound to any of the ports of the contracting countries must be provided with a clean bill of health from the port of sailing, certified to by the consuls of the countries to which they are bound and of those at which they may touch. When the vessels sail from ports belonging to any of the contracting countries, the bill of health shall be granted by the sanitary authority of the port of departure and must always be certified to as above specified.

This bill of health shall be presented to the sanitary authority of the ports of the contracting countries at which the vessel may touch, for his certification, and shall be delivered to that of the last port of destination.

1. Consuls shall charge the proper fees for the certification of bills of health.

2. The consular visé or certification shall be entered on the back of the bill of health and authenticated with the seal of the consulate.

$ 3. When, by reason of acquired information and a thorough knowledge of the facts, the consul shall have no remarks to make as to the asseverations of the bill of health, its certification will be simple; when otherwise, the consul himself shall write down after the visé what he may deem proper to rectify the asseverations of the bill of health.

The bills of health which may be rectified, after being certified to at the first port of any of the contracting countries at which the vessel may touch, shall be accompanied by a sanitary bill, signed by the authority of the same port, in which shall be stated the treatment to which the vessel may have been subjected. The remittance of the bill shall be stated after the visé.

4. The consuls of the contracting countries at the ports of departure shall endeavor to ascertain through the local sanitary authorities, or as best they may, the sanitary condition of those ports, and in case of rectifying a bill of health, shall inform at once the sanitary authority of their country, who will forward to that of the other contracting countries the reason for the rectification.

5. If the rectifications mentioned in paragraph 3 should be made by the consuls of more than one of the contracting parties, the bill of health shall be forwarded by the sanitary authority of the first port reached by the vessel to that of the first port of the next nation, and by the corresponding authority of the latter to that of the following ports, always accompanied by the sanitary bill.

6. Vessels bound to ports of more than one of the contracting countries shall successively, at each of these, provide themselves with bills of health, and the captain must deliver all these bills to the authority of the last port of arrival.

7. The contracting countries recognize two kinds of bills of health, clean and unclean; that being clean which does not state any case of exotic pestilential disease at the port of departure or at those of relay, and unclean, that which should mention epidemies or isolated cases of the diseases referred to.

8. Men of war of friendly nations shall be granted bills of health without paying fees.

ARTICLE 11. The contracting countries agree to appoint a corps of vessel inspectors composed of physicians paid by the respective Governments. It will be their special mission on board the vessels assigned to them to see to the compliance with the measures prescribed in behalf of the health of passengers and crews; they will also notice what may occur during the voyage and report thereon to the sanitary authority at the port of destination.

1. Vessel inspectors shall be officials of the sections of marine sanitary of their respective countries and be subordinate to their respective chiefs, whose orders and instructions they shall obey implicitly.

2. Vessel inspectors shall compete for their appointment by the Government, and it shall be the duty the chiefs of the respective sanitary services to designate the inspectors to be placed on board.

3. The programme and purpose of the competition shall be determined by the international sanitary regulations as well as the duties and powers assigned to vessel inspectors.

ARTICLE 12.

It is agreed by the contracting countries that two kinds of quarantine shall be established at their respective ports:

(a) A strict quarantine; and
(b) A quarantine of observation.

1. The strict quarantine shall consist of the absolute isolation of the vessel during the time required for the sanity and disinfection of the articles infested with cholera, yellow fever, or eastern plague, and for the lapse of the maximum period of incubation of the pestilent;al disease.

2. The quarantine of observation shall consist of the absolute isolation of the vessel during the time required to make on board a visit of sanitary inspection, and for the lapse of the maximum period of incubation of the pestilential exotic disease, in case that the vessel has been at sea less than eight days for cholera, less than ten for yellow fever, and less than twenty for the eastern plague.

3. The strict quarantine shall be applied 1. To infected vessels;

2. To vessels on board of which cases of diseases not specified may have occurred which the sanitary visit has not made known; and

3. To vessels hailing from ports where one of the pestilential diseases exists, if they have not complied with the sanitary regulations required at the port of departure, and during the voyage, even should they not have had on board a case of pestilential disease, either real or suspicious.

4. The duration of the strict quarantine shall be determined by the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease guarded against, eight days being assigned for Asiatic cholera, ten days for yellow fever, and twenty days for the eastern plague.

This duration may be computed in two ways:

1. Counting from the date of the termination by death or cure of the last case which has occurred on board during the voyage; and

2. Counting from the date of the landing of the passengers at the quarantine hospital.

5. The strict quarantine shall begin from the date by death or cure of the last case occurring on board during the voyage, when:

(a) The vessel belongs to the first class.

(6) A vessel sanitary inspector coming on board should certify to the precise date of the last case, to the compliance with all the measures for disinfection prescribed in t:re instructions which the same inspector may have received from the chief of the sanitary service, and to the present perfect state of health on board.

In either case that which is prescribed in this paragraph can not take place unless the sanitary authority shall verify the correctness of the information furnished.

6. If, after the termination of the last case occurring on board, the duration of the voyage should be equal to or greater than the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease, the vessel shall be subjected to a quarantine of observation of 48 hours.

7. If the time elapsed since the last case of pestilential disease should be less than that assigned to the maximum incubation and the vessel should belong to the first class the latter shall not be admitted to free intercourse until after a quarantine of observation, which shall last as many days as may be required to complete the aforesaid term of maximum incubation. If the voyage, after the termination of the last case, should have lasted until the day before the last of the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease which it is desired to guard against, the vessel shall not be allowed free intercourse until 48 hours shall have elapsed after the expiration of the said maximum incubation. This quarantine shall be kept by the passengers at the quarantine hospital, unless there should be no accommodation in the latter, in which case it may be allowed on board.

8. If, at the time of its arrival, there should be in the vessel cases of pestilential disease, they shall be transferred to the floating hospital and the passengers subjected to a quarantine at the quarantine hospital. In this case the quarantine will commence the day of the admission of the passengers to the quarantine hospital.

The vessel and the cargo shall be ventilated and disinfected in conformity with the rules to be prescribed by the international sanitary regulations.

9. Vessels of the second class shall be subjected to the requirements of the preceding paragraph when they shall have had cases of pestilential diseases, even when they do not exist at the time of their arrival.

10. Suspicious vessels, the voyage of which may have lasted a period of time shorter than that of the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease to be guarded against, shall not be admitted to free intercourse until they shall have passed a quarantine of observation, which must last as many days as may be required to complete the term of maximum incubation. If the voyage should have lasted until the day before the last of the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease, they shall not be admitted to free intercourse until after 48 hours after having completed the aforesaid term in case they should hail from an infected port, and after 24 hours in other cases.

11. Suspicious vessels which may perform their voyage in a period of time longer than the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease to be guarded against shall be admitted to free intercourse after a quarantine of observation of 48 hours, if they proceed from infected ports, and of 24 hours in other cases.

During this quarantine the investigations prescribed by the international sanitary regulations shall be carried out.

ARTICLE 13.

The declaration of infected, as applied to a port, shall cause the sanitary interdiction of vessels hailing therefrom which may have sailed during the period immediately preceding the date of said declaration ; being twenty days for the eastern plague, ten for the yellow fever, and eight for the Asiatic cholera.

ARTICLE 14. The declaration of the termination of the epidemic at a port shall not cause the sanitary interdiction of the vessels hailing from it to be dispensed with until twenty days shall have elapsed for the eastern plague, ten for the yellow fever, and eight for Asiatic cholera.

ARTICLE 15.

The rules prescribed for maritime ports shall apply to river ports har.boring sea-going vessels.

ARTICLE 16. The sanitary measures which the contracting countries may adopt within their own territory do not come within the scope of the present convention.

ARTICLE 17. Should the contracting countries decide to establish international sanitary cordons, they bind themselves not to detain passengers for any longer period than that of the maximum incubation of the pestilential disease to be guarded against, and to establish the quarantine hospitals which may be required, in order that the quarantines may be kept therein, the latter being governed by the same regulations prescribed for maritime quarantines so far as they may be applicable thereto.

JULIO RODRIGUEZ, Delegate from Bolivia.
ANDRES S. MUÑOZ, Delegate from Bolivia.
FEDERICO PUGA BORNE, Delegate from Chile.
CELSO BAMBARÉN, Delegate from Ecuador.
FRANCISCO Rosas, Delegate from Peru.
J. LINO ALARCO, Delegate from Peru.

JOSÉ MARIANO MACEDO, Delegate from Peru.
LIMA, March 12, 1888.
Correct:

ANDRÉS S. MUÑOZ, Secretary to the Congress.

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