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21. INTERNATIONAL LAW:

A. PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW ... ... ... 876
B. CLAIMS AND DIPLOMATIC INTERVENTION.. 933
C. NAVIGATION OF RIVERS...

939 22. ARBITRATION:

A. PLAN OF ARBITRATION .................. 954
B. RECOMMENDATION TO EUROPEAN POWERS. 1084

C. THE RIGHT OF CONQUEST .............. 1122 23. MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS OF THE CONFERENCE.

A. MEMORIAL TABLET......
B. LATIN-AMERICAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY.... 1156
C. COMPLIMENTARY RESOLUTIONS........... 1161
D. COLOMBIAN EXPOSITION .....

· 1165 E. FAREWELL ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT. 1166

............ 1153

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON THE

PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS.

(Adopted March 7, 1890.)

The Executive Committee having had under consideration a proposition of the honorable Delegate from Uruguay, submitted on the 31st of January ultimo, concerning the printing of the proceedings of this Conference, beg leave to submit the following as their report, and ask its adoption :

Resolved, That twenty-five copies of the daily minutes, as approved by the Conference, be printed and bound for the use of each delegation."

" Resolved, That the proceedings of the Conference to be printed shall be the resolutions offered by the Delegates; the reports of committees, the discussions thereon, in extenso, and the action of the Conference upon the same. Each Delegate may, with the consent of the Conference, withdraw any remarks made by him during a debate. The Executive Committee shall see that the translations correspond accurately with their respective originals and supervise the printing of said proceedings in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, as soon as practicable."

INTERNATIONAL AMERICAN CONFERENCE*

THE INVITATION AND ACCEPTANCES. The Fiftieth Congress of the United States enacted, and the President of the United States approved, on the twenty-fourth of May, 1888, the following law:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, requested and authorized to invite the several Governments of the Republics of Mexico, Central and South America, Hayti, San Domingo, and the Empire of Brazil to join the United States in a Conference, to be held at Washington, in the United States, at such time as he may deem proper, in the year eighteen hundred and eightynine, for the purpose of discussing and recommending for adoption to their respective Governments some plan of arbitration for the settlement of disagreements and disputes that may hereafter arise between them, and for considering questions relating to the improvement of business intercourse and means of direct communication between said countries, and to encourage such reciprocal commercial relations as will be beneficial to all and secure more extensive markets for the products of each of said countries.

SEC. 2. That in forwarding the invitations to the said Governments the President of the United States shall set forth that the Conference is called to consider

First. Measures that shall tend to preserve the peace and promote the prosperity of the several American States.

* A history of the several attempts to hold an International American Conference, from 1825 to 1888, will be found in the appendix, with important State papers relating thereto.

Tais.

Second. Measures toward the formation of an American customs union, under which the trade of the American nations with each other shall, so far as possible and profitable, be promoted.

Third. The establishment of regular and frequent communication between the ports of the several American States and the ports of each other.

Fourth. The establishment of a uniform system of customs regulations in each of the independent American States to govern the mode of importation and exportation of inerchandise and port dues and charges, a uniform method of determining the classification and valuation of such merchandise in the ports of each country, and a uniform system of invoices, and the subject of the sanitation of ships and quarantine.

Fifth. The adoption of a uniform system of weights and measures, and laws to protect the patent-rights, copyrights, and trade-marks of citizens of either country in the other, and for the extradition of criminals.

Sixth. The adoption of a common silver coin, to be issued by each Government, the same to be legal tender in all commercial transactions between the citizens of all the American States.

Seventh. An agreement upon and recommendation for adoption to their respective Governments of a definite plan of arbitration of all questions, disputes, and differences that may now or hereafter exist between them, to the end that all difficulties and disputes between such nations may be peaceably settled and wars prevented.

Eighth. And to consider such other subjects relating to the welfare of the several States represented as may be presented by any of said States which are hereby invited to participate in said Conference.

SEC. 3. That the sum of seventy-five thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the same to be disbursed under the direction and in the discretion of the Secretary of State, for expenses incidental to the Conference.

SEC. 4. That the President of the United States shall

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