Platōnos Parmenidēs. The Parmenides of Plato, with intr., analysis and notes by T. Maguire

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Hodges, Figgis, 1882

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Página xxviii - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Página ix - Darwin himself. The general result is that to insects, and especially to bees, we owe the beauty of our gardens, the sweetness of our fields. To their beneficent, though unconscious action, flowers owe their scent and colour, their honey — nay, in many cases, even their form.
Página 74 - ... however, in line with his account of the untruth of objects, to have attempted to represent this inconsistency as a conflict between the concept and its exemplification: The relation of whole and parts is untrue to the extent that its concept and reality do not correspond to each other. The concept of the whole is to contain parts; but if the whole is posited as what it is by its concept, if it is divided, it ceases to be a whole (Enz.
Página ix - ... from a different plant ; and he proved that flowers fertilised with pollen from the other form yield more seed than if fertilised with pollen of the same form, even if taken from a different plant. Attention having been thus directed to the question, an astonishing variety of most beautiful contrivances have been observed and described by many botanists, especially Hooker, Axel, Delpino, Hildebrand, Bennett, Fritz Miiller, and above all Hermann Miiller and Darwin himself.
Página xii - All that afterwards becomes thought is implicit not in mere feeling, but in the primitive relations between feelings ; out of the combination of elementary feelings having at first simple relations to one another, all the complexity of actual consciousness arises. Thus the self-consciousness which the Hegelians say must always be present is implicit at first as some simple relation between feelings, while the
Página xi - we have rather that out of which science springs than science itself. Science can hardly be said to begin until we have by experiment acquired such a knowledge of the relation between events and their antecedents, between processes and their products, that in our own sphere we are able to forecast the operations of nature, even when they lie beyond the reach of direct observation.. I would accordingly claim for physiology a place in the sisterhood of the sciences, not because so large a number of...
Página ix - The general result is, that to insects, and especially to bees, we owe the beauty of our gardens, the sweetness of our fields. To their beneficent, though unconscious action, flowers owe their scent and colour, their honey — nay, in many cases, their form. Their present shape and varied arrangements, their brilliant colours, their honey, and their sweet scent are all due to the selection exercised by insects.
Página ix - Their present shape and varied "arrangements, their brilliant colours, their honey, and their sweet scent are all due to the selection exercised by insects. In these cases the relation between plants and insects is one of mutual advantage. In many species, however, plants present us with complex arrangements adapted to protect them from insects ; such, for instance, are in many cases the resinous glands which render leaves unpalatable ; the thickets of hairs and other precautions which prevent flowers...
Página xi - ... of salts, and to observe the differences of property which are produced in them by the replacement of one element by another. It enabled us to see...
Página 65 - Since Will is the centre of ourselves and of all things, we must give it the first rank.

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