Natural Justice

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Oxford University Press, 2005 M03 17 - 224 páginas
This book lays out foundations for a "science of morals." Binmore uses game theory as a systematic tool for investigating ethical matters. He reinterprets classical social contract ideas within a game-theory framework and generates new insights into the fundamental questions of social philosophy. In contrast to the previous writing in moral philosophy that relied on vague notion such as " societal well-being" and "moral duty," Binmore begins with individuals; rational decision-makers with the ability to empathize with one another. Any social arrangement that prescribes them to act against their interests will become unstable and eventually will be replaced by another, until one is found that includes worthwhile actions for all individuals involved.
 

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Contenido

1 Moral Science
1
2 Bargaining
21
3 Battle of the Isms
37
4 Equilibrium
57
5 Reciprocity
77
6 Duty
93
7 Kinship
101
8 Empathy
113
9 The Golden Rule
129
10 Utilitarianism
147
11 Egalitarianism
165
12 Planned Decentralization
185
Bibliography
201
Index
205
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Acerca del autor (2005)

Ken Binmore is a mathematician-turned-economist who has devoted his life to the theory of games and its applications in economics, evolutionary biology, psychology, and moral philosophy. He is best known for his part in designing the telecom auction that raised $35 billion for the British taxpayer, but his major research contributions are to the theory of bargaining and its testing in the laboratory. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of 12 books and some 90 research papers. He is Emeritus Professor of Economics at University College London.

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