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File No. 893.00/701.

The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

[Telegram.--Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, November 28, 1911–10 a. m. I am requesting the Admiral to send 70 more marines for east side of quarter.

CALHOUN.

File No. 893.00/701.

The Secretary of State to the American Minister.

(Telegram.-Para pbra se.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 28, 1911, 5 p. m. The Department takes for granted that you have informed your colleagues of the action reported taken in your November 28, 10 a. m., and desires to be kept promptly and exactly informed of arrival of foreign troops in China. Yesterday the Japanese Chargé d'Affaires here stated that the Japanese forces in North China were to be increased to 1,243 men, their distribution between Peking and other points to be determined later; also that 200 Russian troops have recently arrived in Tientsin.

You may inform your colleagues that this Government recognizes the obligation imposed by the rights under the protocol of 1901 and will hold at Manila in constant readiness from 500 to 2500 men for despatch on short notice.

Kyox. File No. 893.00/726.

The American Minister to the Secretary of State,

(Telegram.-Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, November 29, 1911, midnight. The information contained in your November 28, 5 p. m., correct. Through the mediation of the British Consulate at Hankow and British Minister, a three days' armistice at Hankow has been agreed to.

CALHOUN.

File No. 893.00/881.

(Telegram.--Extract.-Paraphrase.)

Peking, January 3, 1912. If we send any troops to help guard railroad British Minister says they had better come at once, and advises a regiment. I would not recommend more at present.

CALHOUN.

File No. 893.00/881.

The Secretary of State to the American Minister.

(Telegram.--Extract.-Paraphrase.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 5, 1912. It is desired to maintain in every way the policy of complete unity of action among the powers. Therefore in regard to the advisability of sending more troops at this time and as to the number, the Department would like to have your recommendations based upon consultation and agreement with your other colleagues as well as the British.

KNOX.

File No. 893.00/903.

The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

(Telegram.-Extract.- Paraphrase.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, January 8, 1912. I did not base my telegram of January 3 merely on British Minister's request but on previous concurrence of colleagues concerned. It is generally understood that we would cooperate. Trouble occurred on section of road allotted to us, therefore British Minister asked about our troops. I have again conferred with colleagues and told them I had again recommended a regiment. All agreed it was proper. British are guarding our section until our troops arrive. 1 am not insistent on regiment; perhaps a smaller force would suffice. I have explained about troops to Yuan and to Liang Shih Yi, Director General, who both expressed assent, but said they expected to be able to protect the line.

CALHOUN.

Filc No. 893.00/903.

The Secretary of State to the American Minister.

(Telegram.-- Paraphrase.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 9, 1912. Communicate the following to the Chinese Government and to your colleagues :

The Government of the United States has been informed by the Legation that the representatives of the powers believed it expedient, in regard to keeping open the railroad to Peking, that the United States should send a regiment comprising some 1.200 men, and that this was acquiesced in by the Chinese Government. The Government of the United States was prepared to take this action in pursuance of the protocols, on the basis of this fresh accord. But it is now informed by the Legation that the situation on the railroad is less acute and that the Chinese Government expects to be able to keep the road open. Consequently the American Government understands that to send only 500 troops will be satisfactory for the present, and orders to this effect have been issued.

1 This was done on the 11th, by notes verbales, the text of which was sent to the Department on the 16th in dispatch 398. (File No. 893.00/1039.)

Knox.

File No. 893.00/1132.

The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

[Telegram.]

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, March 2, 1912—10 p. m. Paoting-fu looted and many houses burned, including some missions; several foreigners reported killed; telegraph broken. Looting troops started for Peking by train. Tong Shao-yi sent a note to British Minister representing situation as serious and requested the diplomatic representatives to save Peking and prevent bloodshed. Diplomatic representatives agreed that foreigners should not actively intervene, but that in view of prevailing anarchy decided to bring 1,000 troops from Tientsin for restraining effect. English, French, Germans, Japanese, and Russians will participate. I have applied to Arrasmith for 200 men. Tong expressed satisfaction. I have importunate calls for guards from missions here and can use additional troops with good effect.

CALHOUN.

File No. 893.00/1134.

(Telegram.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, March 3, 1912—10 a. m. The 200 American troops have arrived. Serious mutiny, with looting and burning, at Tientsin last night.

CALHOUX,

File No. 893.00/1135.
The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

[Telegram.—Extract.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, March 3, 1912—11 p. m. Riot started at palace of Yuan by regular troops, who next attacked building occupied by Nanking delegation.“ Police and old style troops joined looting. Considerable portion of city burned. Losses, amounting to millions, fall chiefly upon small tradesmen. Have asked apology for shell that fell in Legation. No attempt until yesterday to suppress disorders. Last night soldiers confined to barracks. The police, mostly Manchus, preserved order.

Chinese authorities have asked consul to take charge with foreign military. Some antiforeign feeling. Hostile force reported approaching Tientsin. All Americans there safe. Mutineers at FengTai last night fought with other Chinese troops and stopped two railway trains; robbed passengers. This morning they attempted to hold up American troop train but retired upon show of fight by Americans and British railway guard. Yuan appears to be without plans.

CALHOUN.

File No. 893.00/1145a.

The Acting Secretary of State to the American Minister.

(Telegram.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 4, 1912-1 p. m. Reverting to the Department's telegraphic instructions of January 9, 12 noon, arrangement has been made for the present with the War Department that in case you consider it advisable, after consúltation with your colleagues, you may, without awaiting further instructions, communicate with the Commanding General, Philippine Islands, informing him that you need additional troops. He has instructions from the War Department to send you from the Philippines, on receiving such notification from you, the remainder of the 1,200 men already provided for. Report to the Department any action you may take on this instruction. Inform your principal colleagues of this instruction.

HUNTINGTON WILSON.

File No. 893.00/1146.

The American Minixter to the Secretary of State.

(Telegram.-Extract.)

AMERICAN LEGATION,

Peking, March 6, 1912-4 p. m. With reference to your telegram of March 4, 1 p. m. After consulting colleagues I have telegraphed for the additional troops.

CALHOUN.

NOTE.—The disturbances having subsided, no further correspondence appears on this subject.

CLAIMS OF AMERICAN CITIZENS AGAINST CHINA. JOINT PRO

CEDURE OF THE POWERS FOR PRESENTATION OF CLAIMS.

File No. 893.00/1217.

The Acting Secretary of State to the American Minister.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 4, 1912. SIR: I have to enclose herewith for the information and guidance of the Legation copy of an instruction this day addressed to the Consul General at Hankow regarding the manner of treating claims of American citizens and firms growing out of the recent disturbances in China.

In replying to any requests on the part of the American consular officers in China for instructions as to what action, if any, they may properly take with reference to such claims, you should follow the instructions embodied in the inclosure to this communication. I am [etc.]

HUNTINGTON WILSON.

(Inclosure.]

The Acting Secretary of State to the Consul General at Hankow.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, No. 23.)

Washington, April 4, 1912. Sir: The Department is in receipt of your dispatch No. 23 of February 16, 1912, reporting in regard to the massacre of American missionaries in Shensi Province and inclosing copy of a letter from Mr. E. E. Beckman in which he suggests that a proper indemnity be demanded for these outrages.

In reply you are instructed that until the establishment of a stable, responsible government it is not probable that any claim for indemnification of lives lost and for reimbursement of property destroyed during the recent disturbances will be presented to China. All such claims as may be filed with the Consulate General should in the meantiine be carefully substantiated and the record in each case preserved in order that, when the Department deems the proper time to have arrived, all claims may be forwarded promptly to the Legation and to the Department for such formal action as the facts and circumstances of the particular claims may warrant. I am (etc.)

(For Mr. Huntington Wilson.)

WILBUR J. CARR.

File No. 493,00.)

The American Minister to the Secretary of State.

AMERICAN LEGATION, No. 513.)

Peking, April 11, 1912.. Sir: I have the honor to report that at a meeting of the diplomatic representatives held on April 9, 1912, the French Minister referred to the fact that the legations are receiving from their nationals many claims against the Chinese Government for indemnification for losses sustained by them during the recent revolution. In order to avoid diverse or conflicting action on the part of the several legations in the presentation and adjustment of claims M. de Margerie suggested that some common procedure should be adopted and followed in regard to them. After some discussion it was agreed to appoint a commission, of which the American Minister was requested to act as chairman, the remaining members to be selected from the secretaries of legation, which commission should examine the claims sent in and formulate certain general principles in accordance with which the legations concerned should take action.

It is not intended that this commission shall pass upon claims nor that it shall determine the amount to be asked. After the principles

* Not printed.

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