The Works of George Herbert in Prose and Verse: Edited from the Latest Editions, with Memoir, Explanatory Notes, Etc

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J.W.Lovell, 1881 - 594 páginas

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Página 288 - EACH me, my God and King, In all things Thee to see, And what I do in anything, To do it as for Thee.
Página 89 - HOU, whose sweet youth and early hopes enhance Thy rate and price, and mark thee for a treasure, Hearken unto a verser, who may chance Rhyme thee to good, and make a bait of pleasure : A verse may find him who a sermon flies, And turn delight into a sacrifice.
Página 259 - Let us (said he) pour on him all we can : Let the world's riches, which dispersed lie, Contract into a span. So strength first made a way ; Then beauty flow'd, then wisdom, honour, pleasure : When almost all was out, God made a stay, Perceiving that alone, of all his treasure, Rest in the bottom lay. For if I should...
Página 293 - A guest, I answer'd, worthy to be here : Love said, You shall be he. I the unkind, ungrateful ? Ah, my dear, I cannot look on thee.
Página 125 - With thee O let me rise As larks, harmoniously, And sing this day thy victories : Then shall the fall further the flight in me.
Página 105 - Sum up at night what thou hast done by day ; And in the morning, what thou hast to do. Dress and undress thy soul ; mark the decay And growth of it. If, with thy watch, that too Be down, then wind up both. Since we shall be Most surely judged, make thy accounts agree.
Página 181 - Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure. The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. The stars have us to bed ; ' Night draws the curtain, which the sun withdraws : ° Music and light attend our head. All things unto our flesh are kind, In their descent and being; to our mind, In their ascent and cause.
Página 180 - Man is all symmetry, Full of proportions, one limb to another, And all to all the world besides: Each part may call the farthest, brother : For head with foot hath private amity, And both with moons and tides.
Página 128 - Lord, with what care hast thou begirt us round, Parents first season us ; then schoolmasters Deliver us to laws ; they send us bound To rules of reason, holy messengers, Pulpits and Sundays, sorrow dogging sin, Afflictions sorted, anguish of all sizes...
Página 157 - Whose honesty is not So loose or easy, that a ruffling wind Can blow away, or glittering look it blind ; Who rides his sure and even trot, While the world now rides by, now lags behind...

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