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ENGRAVING: 'BURNETT HOUSE,' CINCINNATI: ED.'s TAB., p. 823.
Art. I. SKETCHES FROM THE COUNTRY. BY W. L. TIFFANY,. ...

II. STANZAS: 'DAWNING,'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
III. THE LOVERS' LEAP: A SENECA LEGEND, . . . . . . . . . . . 298
IV. THE PRIDE OF OUR VILLAGE: A TALE, ........

. 234 V. NIGHT-PIECE' TO JULIA,. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 239 VI. A MOTHER'S LAMENT. BY THE 'PEASANT BARD,' .......... 240 VII. THE PORTRAIT. BY L. A. RANDALL, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 VIIITHE FIFTH ODE OF HORACE, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 IX. STANZAS: “MUSIC,' ....

x. THE HISTORY OF CAPTAIN SAMPSON STRONGBOW,......... 255 XI. LINES: “THE DYING GIRL, .

. 261 XII. PLEASANT MEMORIES OF THE OL

D. . . . .

..262 XIII. STANZAS: “THE LITTLE GARDEN, ............... 268 XIV. THE HUDSON RIVER,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269

XV. STANZAS. BY H. W. ROCKWELL, Esq., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 XVI. BURIED TREASURE. BY CHARLES M. DENNIE, . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 XVII. MY CAMPAIGN REMINISCENCES. PAPER NINTH, ..... XVIII. LINES TO MYRA. BY LAWRENCE LABREE, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 XIX. TIP-TOP BALLADS, IN THE MODERN STYLE. BY MEISTER KARL, . ..288

LITERARY NOTICES :

1. POEMS BY ERASTUS W. ELLSWORTH, .............. 289 2. CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE: A NOVEL. BY CHARLES READE, ..... .. 295 3. A VISIT TO THE CAMP BEFORE SEVASTOPOL,. . . . . . . . . . . 299 4. SMITH'S SPELLER AND DEFINER'S MANUAL,' . 5. LAYS FROM THE GLEN: 'MUSINGS OF LEISURE HOURS,'..... 301 6. ARIEL, AND OTHER POEMS. By W. W. FoSDICK, .......... 308

EDITOR'S TABLE:

1. A DAY'S ANGLING AMONG THE MOUNTAINS, ........... 304 2. A NECESSARY WORD TO NEW CORRESPONDENTS, ..... ... 310 3. INTERMINGLED LEAVES OF GOSSIP AND TRAVEL,. ........ 311

1. A TRIP ON THE NEW-YORK AND ERIE RAIL-ROAD FROM NEW-YORK TO DUNKIRK.

2. NEW WORKS IN PRESS : BITS OF BLARNEY:' BY DR. R. SHELTON MACKEN-
ZIE: GRATTAN, O'CONNELL, AND CURRAN. 3. THE FIRST MOSQUITO OF THE SEA-
SON: LINES TO A 'SKEETIR.' 4. THE LAKE SHORE RAIL-ROAD'FROM DUNKIRK :
APPROACH TO CLEVELAND: LAKE ERIE. 5. ANECDOTE OF DR.

H

O F NORTHERN NEW-YORK. 6. FROM CLEVELAND TO SHELBY, Ohio, ‘BY RAIL:' THE E. CLAMSIS VITAS' ORDER OF CINCINNATI: INTERVIEW WITH TIB GREAT GYASTACUTAS.' 7. AN ORIGINAL LETTER FROM S. T. COLERIDGE, 8. TEMPTATIONS OF GENUS:' OVERTURES OF Miss TUTE TO MR. K. N. PEPPER, Esq. : ALLIANCE DECLINED. 8. JOURNEY TOWARD THE Ohio RIVER, THROUGH EASTERN OHIO. 9. A PLBASURE EXCURSION TO MADISON, WISCONSIN. 10. SOMERSET, PERRY COUNTY, Ohio, AND ITS ENVIRONS: THE SCARLET WOMAN' AT LARGE: VISIT TO THE COAL AND IRON MINES OF EASTERN Ouio: A PIG-IRON FURNACE IN FULL BLast.' 11. A SICCATIVE MARVELLEAUX,' FOR THE AMERICAN MARKET. 12. APPROACH TO PORTSMOUTH, OHIO: FIRST VIEW OF THE OH10 RIVER. 13. RENOVATION OF THE REVOLUTIONARY CLASSICALITIES OF OLD TAPPAAN-TOWN.' 14. FIRST IMPRESSIONS' UPON THE SOIL or "OLD KENTUCKY. 15. THE OLIVE LEAFLETS' PUBLICATIONS. 16. THE OHIO RIVER, FROM PORTSMOUTH TO CINCINNATI, 17, ARRIVAL OF THE SWINETTE A PIST'ON,' or PiG-TAIL WHISTLE, 18. CINCINNATI AND ITS ENVIRONS : THE BURNETT HOUSE:' WITH AN ENGRAVINO. 19. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION AND COLLEGE Review.' 20. FROM CINCINNATI TO LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 21, A WAIL FOR Poor LONE HANNAH' 22. VISIT TO MR. NICHOLAS LONGWORTH'S WINE ESTABLISHMENT, ETC. 23. GOSBIP FROM WASHINGTON CITY: GENBRAL CUSHING : CARPENTER, THE PORTRAIT-PAINTER, ETC. 24. A TURNEDROUND' ABOLITION "ARGUMENT.' 25. ORIGINAL PAPERS' FOR OCTOBER. 26. THE CITY OF LOUISVILLE, 27. THE COMET IS COMING!-LOOK-OUT! 28. THE HOTELS OF LOUISVILLE. 29. FIBS OF SPECULATORS IN BREAD-STUFFS, 30. NEW EDITION OF THE FEDERALIST. 31. A NEGRO FAIR IN LOUISVILLE, 32. BARNUM'S GALLERY OF BEAUTY.' 33. HOME AGAIN!' 34. HEINE'S ‘PicTURES OF TRAVEL. 35. GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 36. GENIN'S HATISSUE. 37. DEFERRED ARTICLES,

ENTERED ACOORDING TO AOT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1655, 37

SAMUEL EUESTON,
IN TIE OLERK'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OP NEW-YORK.

JOHN A. GRAY,

PRINTER, 95 & 97 Cliff Street, New-York.

clats Golra afedés

of bambrane THE KNICKERBOCKER.

Grups of 1865

VOL. XLVI.

SEPTEMBER, 1855.

No. 3.

SK ET C-H ES FROM THE COUNTRY.

BY WL. TIFFANY.

GATHERING BIRD'S EGGS ON THE SEA-BEACE,

JUNE 4. — The coast line of New-Jersey consists of a continuous chain of long narrow islands, known as “beaches, which are separated from the main-land by wide creeks and sounds, running parallel with the sea, and connecting with the same by various inlets and channels.

The beach islands comprised within the limits of this county (Cape May) vary from two to ten miles in length, and from one to four miles in width. The most noteworthy among them are called respectively Peck's Beach, Seven-Mile Beach, and Five-Mile Beach. (The wellknown watering-place, Cape May, is situated upon a small island, which, being almost entirely bare of trees or other vegetation, is chiefly known to our country people as Poverty Beach.)

Next the sea, the beaches are generally composed of a dreary range of white sand-hills, which are reared and destroyed by the waves with a steady alternation. Behind these hills, and sheltered from the salt spray, a strip of forest, comprised of oak, gum, red cedar, and holly trees, is usually met with, beneath the shade of which flourishes an almost impenetrable under-growth of alders, briers, bay-berry shrubs, prickly pear, grass and weeds. This strip of timber stretches landward from the hills, until repelled by the extreme saltness of the soil adjacent to the sounds, when a growth of salt-grass, interspersed with elderbushes, prevails. Such are the ordinary features of the beaches; but owing to the work of the winds and waters, of whose peculiar domain they are the planted boundary, their aspect greatly changes from year to year. The shifting sand-hills constantly engulf portions of the adjacent woods, leaving barely the brown and withered branches perceptible above the earth. The swift currents of the sounds and inlets steadily carve out fresh courses, thus either changing tracts of the marshes into sand-flats, permitting their fresh formation, or obliterating

VOL XLVI.

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