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COLONIAL ADMINISTRATION, 1800-1900.

The purpose of this study is to present a picture of present governmental conditions in the colonies of the world. It is not intended as an historical study, except so far as is necessary to present in concrete form the fundamental causes which have led to the adoption of the existing systems of government, in the world's principal colonies, and which are the result of many years of experiment by many nations and among many classes of people. Careful studies of these subjects, by able and experienced men of all nations, have given to the public in concrete form a series of analyses of the causes of colonial failures and successes and the requirements for successfully and faithfully dealing with a people who are being governed in noncontiguous territory. These discussions, the result of many years of study and practical experience in colonization, have been freely drawn upon in this study in the hope of thus presenting in a single view what may be termed the world's best judgment of to-day's requirements in the government of a people differing in race characteristics and climatic environment from that of the governing people, and occupying noncontiguous territory. The feature of these studies which, for obvious reasons, most interests the people of the United States at the present moment, is that relating to tropical and subtropical countries and peoples rather than that of well-developed communities, composed chiefly of former residents of the mother country or their descendants. For this reason conditions in such advanced colonies as Canada, Australia, and South Africa are not presented in the detail which would be appropriate to a work of more general character.

In all of the discussions which follow, it should be remembered that the facilities for properly administering a government in noncontiguous territory are vastly better to-day than a century or half century ago. Communication between the home government and that of the colony, which formerly required weeks, is now instantaneous, and exchanges of the productions of one section for those of another, which then required months of time and heavy expense of transportation, are now accomplished with but a fraction of the time and cost, while the increaseci facilities by which the people of the country and colony may visit and become acquainted with each other favor a closer and more harmonious relationship than was possible under the conditions formerly existing.

AREA AND POPULATION OF THE WORLD'S COLONIES.

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The colonies, so-called, of the world, including in this term all territory not contiguous to the country by whose Government it is controlled, occupy two-fifths of the land surface of the globe and contain one-third of the world's population, or about 500,000,000 people.

TWO GREAT CLASSES OF COLONIES.

Of this 500,000,000 of colonial population, only three small groups, numbering less than 15,000,000, or 3 per cent of the whole, are composed in any considerable degree of the people of the governing country or their descendants. The population of the “selfgoverning” English colonies of British North America, Australasia, and South Africa is less than 15,000,000, and when these have been considered we seek in vain for a colony of any importance among the remaining 485,000,000 people so classed whose population is in any considerable degree composed of the stock of the governing country. These 15,000,000 people of British stock who make up the self-governing colonies are located chiefly in the temperate zone, while most of the other 485,000,000, native to the so-called colonies, are located in a tropical or subtropical climate.

TROPICAL COLONIES.

The methods of government which have been found best adapted to the colonies located in the Tropics and composed chiefly of people differing in race and customs from those of the governing country are, for obvious reasons, those which chiefly interest the people, the lawmakers, and the executive officers of the United States at the present moment.

The colonies containing the 485,000,000 people of stock differing from that of the governing country and located in the Tropics may be roughly divided into three great groups: (a) East Indian; (6) West Indian; (c) African.

This classification, while not including everyone of the 140 tropical and subtropical colonies of the world, or professing to be strictly accurate in ethnological grouping, brings into three distinct groups the three great masses of people, in as many parts of the world, who have respectively many similar characteristics of race, habits of life, occupation, climatic conditions, and government. In the East Indian or Oriental group may be included the British colonies of India, Ceylon, the Malayan Peninsula, Fiji and Borneo; the Dutch colonies of Java and Sumatra, and the French colony of Indo-China, all located comparatively near to the Philippines and having a population, climate, and conditions somewhat similar to those of the Philippines. This is especially true of the Malayan Peninsula, Jaya, and part of Indo-China, whose population is largely of the Malayan stock, which forms the bulk of the population of the Philippines and the original population of the Hawaiian Islands. The second group, the West Indian, brings together for general consideration the British, French, Dutch, and Danish West India Islands, having a population, climate, production, and government similar to each other in many particulars, and in a study of which we are, for obvious reasons, also interested. The third group would include the numerous colonies, dependencies, and protectorates of Africa, in which conditions do not parallel so closely those of the islands now under the control of the United States as do those of the East and West Indian groups.

OBJECT LESSONS IN THE EAST INDIES AND WEST INDIES.

For these reasons attention is chiefly given in this study to the two great groups of colonies in the East and West Indies and the methods of government which have been found most successful in the centuries of experiment and study which the European nations have devoted to them. The East Indian or Oriental group contains about 350,000,000 people, the West Indian group about 5,000,000.

The seven great nations which have in modern times experimented with the government of noncontiguous people, or “colonies,” so called, are England, Netherlands, France, Belgium, Germany, Portugal, and Spain, and their relative success may be considered as in about the order in which they are here named. The population of those of Great Britain is in round numbers 350,000,000; Netherlands, 35,000,000; France, 56,000,000; Belgium (Kongo Free State), 30,000,000; Germany, 15,000,000; Portugal, 9,000,000; and Spain, 135,000. Of England's 350,000,000, nearly 300,000,000 are in the East Indian group, and less than 3,000,000 in the West Indies. Netherlands kas about 35,000,000 in the East Indian group and 50,000 in the West Indies, and France, 25,000,000 in the East Indian group and 300,000 in the West Indies,

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