Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

Humourous, and Familiar Pieces,

Prose.

THE DISABLED SOLDIER.

CHARACTER OF A SOT.
TH ) CONTENTED PORTER,

by Richardson. AMBASSADOR OF BANTAM'S LETTER.

THE CARDS SPIRITUALIZED.
A SERMON ON THE WORD MALT.

ON QUACKS,

by Dr. Goldsmith. PARISH JOBBING. THE ART OF PUNNING,

&c.

Manchester, Frinted at the Office of G. Nicholson, 9, Spring gardens. Sold by T. Knott, No. 47,

Lombard-street; and Champante & Whitrow, Jewry-street, London.

Anno 1795.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

ng Wen sob Den

90 90

10 ST withou

BY DR. GOLDSMITH.

No observation is more common, and at the same time more true, than, That one half of the world are ignorant how the other half lives. · The misfortunes of the great are held up to engage our attention; are enlarged upon in tones of declamation; and the world is called upon to gaze at the noble sufferers: the great, under the pressure of calamity, are conscious of scveral others sympathizing with their distress; and have, at once, the comfort of admiration and pity:

There is nothing magnanimous in bearing misfore tunes with fortitude, when the whole world is lookng on: men in such circumstances will act bravely, en from motives of vanity; but he who, in the vale of obscurity, can brave adversity; who, without friends to encourage, acquaintances to pity, or even without hope to alleviate his misfortunes, can behave with tranquility and indifference, is truly great: whether peasant or courtier, he deserves admiration, and should be held up for our imitation and respect.

.While the slightest inconveniences of the great are magnified into calamities; while tragedy mouths out their sufferings in all the strains of eloquence; the miseries of the poor are entirely disregarded; and ycé. some of the lower ranks of people undergo more real hardships in one day than those of a more exalicd station suffer in their whole lives. It is inconceivable what difficulties the meanest of our common sailors md soldiers endure without murmuring or regret; without passionately declaiming against Providence, or calling their fellows to be gazers on their intrepidty. Every day is to them a day of misery, and yet they entertain their hard fate without repining.

son.

With what indignation do I hear an Ovid, a Cice. ro, or a Rabutin, complain of their misfortunes and hardships, whose greatest calamity was that of being unable to visit a certain spot of earth, to which they had foolishly attached an idea of happiness! Theit! distresses were pleasures, compared to what many o the adventuring poor every day endure without mur. muring. They ate, drank, and slept; they had slaves to attend them; and were sure of subsistence for life: while many of their fellow-creatures are obliged to wander without a friend to comfort or assist them, and cven without shelter from the severity of the sea.

I have been led into these reflections from accidentally meeting, some days ago, a poor fel. low, whom I knew when a boy, dressed in a sailor's jacket, and begging at one of the outlets of the town with a wooden leg. I knew him to have been hon est and industrious when in the country, and was cu. rious to learn what had reduced him to his present situation. Wherefore, after having given him what I thought proper, I desired to know the history of his life and misfortunes, and the manner in which he was reduced to his present distress. The disabled soldier, for such he was, though dressed in a sailor's habit, scratching his head, and leaning on his crutch, put himself into an attitude to comply with my request, and gave me his history as follows:

• As for my misfortunes, master, I can't pretend to have gone through any more than other folks; for, except the loss of my limb, and my being obliged to beg, I don't know any reason, thank Heaven, that I have to complain: there is Bill Tibbs, of our regi. ment, he has lost both his legs, and an eye to boot; but, thank Heaven, it is not so bad with me yet.

• I was born in Shropshire; my father was a labourer, and died when I was five years old; so tha I was put upon the parish. As he had been a wan. dering sort of a man, the parishioners were not able

« AnteriorContinuar »