Language as a Means of Mental Culture and International Communication: Or, Manual of the Teacher, and the Learner of Languages, Volumen2

Portada
Chapman and Hall, 1853
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 155 - I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently : for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness.
Página 395 - ... be also perfect in that, not omitting what he is already perfect in, but sometimes reviewing that, to. keep it in his memory. And when he comes to write, let these be set him for copies; which, with the exercise of his hand; will also advance him in Latin. This being a more imperfect way than by talking Latin unto him, the formation of the verbs first...
Página 269 - And a better and nearer example herein may be our most noble Queen Elizabeth, who never took yet Greek nor Latin grammar in her hand after the first declining of a noun and a verb, but only by this double translating of Demosthenes and Isocrates daily without missing every forenoon, and likewise some part of Tully every afternoon, for the space of a year or two, hath attained to such a perfect understanding in both the tongues and to such a ready utterance of the Latin, and that with such a judgment...
Página 153 - ... their speech is to be fashioned to a distinct and clear pronunciation, as near as may be to the Italian, especially in the vowels. For we Englishmen being far northerly, do not open our mouths in the cold air wide enough to grace a southern tongue; but are observed by all other nations to speak exceeding close and inward ; so that to smatter Latin with an English mouth, is as ill a hearing as law French.
Página 247 - Tu se' solo colui, da cui io tolsi Lo bello stile, che m
Página 395 - When, by this way of interlining Latin and English one with another, he has got a moderate knowledge of the Latin tongue, he may then be advanced a little farther to the reading of some other easy...
Página 202 - ... made easy to them, and as pleasant as possible. Therefore, wherever they are at a stand, and are willing to go forwards, help them presently over the difficulty, without any rebuke or chiding: remembering that, where harsher ways are taken, they are the effect only of pride and peevishness in the teacher, who . expects children should instantly be masters of as much as he knows : whereas he should rather consider, that his business is to settle in them habits, not angrily to inculcate rules...
Página 395 - ... the next best is to have him taught as near this way as may be, which is by taking some easy and pleasant book, such as ./Esop's fables, and writing the English translation (made as literal as it can be) in one line, and the Latin words, which answer each of them, just over it in another.
Página 367 - The schools of Oxford and Cambridge were founded in a dark age of false and barbarous science; and they are still tainted with the vices of their origin. Their primitive discipline was adapted to the education of priests and monks; and the government still remains in the hands of the clergy, an order of men whose manners are remote from the present world, and whose eyes are dazzled by the light of philosophy.
Página 367 - ... the spirit of monopolists is narrow, lazy, and oppressive : their work is more costly and less productive than that of independent artists ; and the new improvements so eagerly grasped by the competition of freedom are admitted with slow and sullen reluctance in those proud corporations, above the fear of a rival and below the confession of an error.

Información bibliográfica