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home conditions, birth and health records, and information from the employment-certification office.

B. Social agencies of all types should be used by the junior placement office for the best possible adjustment of the boy or girl, including the use of the social-service exchange.

4. Adequate records should be kept by all junior employment bureaus.

A. The information secured should conform to certain minimum and uniform standards drawn up by public bureaus in cooperation with national organizations or State and Federal departments.

B. Every interview should be recorded on the individual record of the applicant and a report be kept of the data secured from each industrial investigation.

C. Report information should be collected, at monthly intervals, to include, as a minimum, record of applicants served, number of applications, positions available, persons placed, and total placements made.

D. Provision should be made for centralized comparable employment information in a community through such devices as uniform monthly reporting, the clearance of labor calls, an information service regarding employment facilities, and a central file of industrial investigations.

5. Junior placement should be done only by those specifically engaged for this work, and training requirements should include at least a high-school education, though a college education is more desirable, with special training in economics, sociology, and case work.

It is desirable that at least one member of the staff shall have had training in the fundamentals of statistics.

It is essential that the placement worker be familiar with labor and education laws and have a knowledge of industrial conditions and opportunities in various fields of work, through visits to industrial and business establishments.

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Other Vocational Guidance Agencies THE vocational-guidance program in a community should involve every effort to cooperate with existing nonpublic organizations interested in guidance.

In order to further this cooperation, private organizations working in the field of guidance should keep informed of modern developments and modify their program of vocational guidance as need arises.

INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES

D

Strikes and Lockouts in the United States in November, 1931

ATA regarding industrial disputes in the United States for

November, 1931, with comparable data for preceding months are presented below. Disputes involving fewer than six workers and lasting less than one day have been omitted.

Table 1 shows the number of disputes beginning in 1927, 1928, 1929, and 1930, the number of workers involved and man-days lost for these years and for each of the months, January, 1930, to November, 1931, inclusive, as well as the number of disputes in effect at the end of each month and the number of workers involved. The number of man-days lost, as given in the last column of the table, refers to the estimated number of working days lost by workers involved in disputes which were in progress during the month or year specified.

TABLE 1.-INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES BEGINNING IN AND IN EFFECT AT END OF EACH MONTH, JANUARY, 1930, TO NOVEMBER, 1931, AND TOTAL NUMBER OF DISPUTES, WORKERS, AND MAN-DAYS LOST IN THE YEARS 1927 TO 1930

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Occurrence of Industrial Disputes, by Industries TABLE 2 gives, by industry, the number of strikes beginning in September, October, and November, 1931, and the number of workers directly involved. TABLE 2-INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES BEGINNING IN SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER, AND

NOVEMBER, 1931

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Size and Duration of Industrial Disputes, by Industries Table 3 gives the number of industrial disputes beginning in November, 1931, classified by number of workers and by industries. TABLK 2, NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES BEGINNING IN NOVEMBER, 1931,

CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER OF WORKERS AND BY INDUSTRIAL GROUPS

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In Table 4 are shown the number of industrial disputes ending in November, 1931, by industries and classified duration. TABLE 4.-NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES ENDING IN NOVEMBER, 1931, BY

INDUSTRIAL GROUPS AND CLASSIFIED DURATION

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Conciliation Work of the Department of Labor in November, 1931

By Hugh L. KERWIN, DIRECTOR OF CONCILIATION THE Secretary of Labor, through the Conciliation Service, exer

cised his good offices in connection with 55 labor disputes during November, 1931. These disputes affected a known total of 34,679 employees. The table following shows the name and location of the establishment or industry in which the dispute occurred, the nature of the dispute (whether strike or lockout or controversy not having reached the strike or lockout stage), the craft or trade concerned, the cause of the dispute, its present status, the terms of settlement, the date of beginning and ending, and the number of workers directly and indirectly involved.

On December 1, 1931, there were 40 strikes before the department for settlement and in addition 33 controversies which had not reached the strike stage. The total number of cases pending was 73.

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11

LABOR DISPUTES HANDLED BY THE CONCILIATION SERVICE DURING THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 1031

1931 1931 Erie Electric Sales & Service Co., Strike. Laborers and elec- Alleged violation of working con- Adjusted. Agreed to employ all Oct. 28 Nov. 7 8 140 Erie, Pa.

ditions by contractor on pump- union men

ing station.
Boehm Bros. (Inc.), Buffalo, --...do. Building-

Unclassified. Nonunion workers Oct. 30 Nov. 5 20 20
N.Y.

employed.
E. & W. Upholstering Co., ...do.. Upholsterers Asked 25 per cent increase, 40-hour Adjusted. Strike called off, no Oct. 15 Dec. 5 20
Philadelphia, Pa.

week and union recognition. change in conditions.
Glass cutters, Arkansas, Okla- ...do.

Glass cutters. Wages and discussion of new agree-Adjusted. Wages cut 17 per cent. Nov. 1 Nov. 12 12,000 15,000
homa, and Ohio.

ment, including wage cut.

No other change.
Fulton Opera House, Lancaster, Lockout.. Operators
Nonunion workers employed.. Pending..

...do.

5
Pa.
Tide Water Oil Co., Bayonne, Threatened Oil workers Wages, hours, and discharge of Adjusted. No discharges; 44-hour Oct. 19 Nov. 2 1,350 1,650
N.J.
strike.

week.
French Leather and Felt Slippers Strike.. Slipper workers. Shop conditions and recognition of Pending.

Oct. 27

40
(Inc.), New York City.

Leather Workers International

Union.
All America Cables (Inc.), New -do------ Cable operators. Wages cut 10 per cent; refusal to Adjusted. Accepted cut and re- Nov. 2 Nov. 9 40
York City.

meet committee of operators. turned.
Post-office building, Millersburg, Controversy. Bricklayers and Discussion of prevailing wage.. Pending

...do.
Ohio.

masons,
Post-office building, Milford, ...do. Sheet-metal workers; Jurisdiction of metal work and pre- Adjusted. Prevailing wages paid; Oct. 28 Nov. 5

8 34 Conn.

roofers.
vailing wage discussion.

job finished; jurisdiction settled.
Brass Bros. & Feinroth Shoe Co., Strike. Shoe and leather Asked reemployment of discharged Adjusted. Reemployed workers Nov. 2 Nov. 6 13 67
New York City.

previously laid off; agreed on

piecework prices. Bleyco Paper Co., New York .do. Paper workers Asked reemployment of 2 girls and Adjusted. Recognition not allowed: Oct. 23 Nov. 4 14 8 City.

recognition of P. W. I. L.

all reemployed; $2 per week

increase; conditions improved.
Kingston Slipper Shop, New

Slipper workers. Asked guaranty against future Adjusted. A greed not to cut Oct. 27 Oct. 31 25 5
York City.

wages this season.
Restful Slipper Co. (Inc.), New do.

Adjusted. Allowed as asked.. Oct. 24 Oct. 26 30
York City.
Brilliant Silk Hosiery Co., ...do. Hosiery workers Working conditions; wages. Pending-

Nov. 5

400
Bloomfield, N.J.
March Field, Riverside, Calif. Controversy. Electrical workers. Prevailing wage discussion. Adjusted. Settled by Army officers Sept. 15 Oct. 30 6

of the field.
Happy Hollow and Block Ridge Strike. Miners

Wage scale and union recognition Adjusted. Union agreement con- Nov. 3 Nov. 22 28
mines, Des Moines, Iowa.

cluded fixing wages and con

ditions, 1 Not reported.

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