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" It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are distinguished from animals by not having the power of movement. It should rather be said that plants acquire and display this power only when it is of some advantage to them... "
The Popular Science Monthly - Página 288
1890
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The New Monthly Belle Assemblée, Volúmenes72-73

1870
...to the weather, would have resisted a strain of ten pounds!" Mr. Darwin thus concludes his paper : " It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...animals by not having the power of movement. It should rather.be said that plants acquire and display this power only when it is of some advantage to them...
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Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Volumen25

1883
...kingdom of organic nature we contemplate, to live is to move. He blandly rebukes the vulgar notion that "plants are distinguished from animals by not having the power of movement," and still more modestly says that "plants acquire and display this power only when it is of some advantage...
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The Year-book of Facts in Science and Art

1866
...power only when it is of some advantage to them ; but this is of comparatively rare occurrence, aa they are affixed to the ground, and food is brought to them by the wind and rain. \Ve see how high in the scale of organization a plant may rise when we look at one of...
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The Journal of the Linnean Society: Botany

1867
...most climbers depend is inherent, though undeveloped, in almost every plant in the vegetable kingdom. It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are distinguished from animals bynot having the power of movement. It should rather be said that plants acquire and display this power...
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Report of the Rugby School Natural History Society

Rugby School. Natural History Society - 1868
...assertion that plants are distinguished from animals by their having no power of motion, is a fallacy. It should rather be said that plants acquire and display this power only when it is of advantage to them : but this is a comparatively rare occurrence, as they are affixed to the ground,...
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The Popular Science Review: A Quarterly Miscellany of Entertaining and ...

James Samuelson, Henry Lawson, William Sweetland Dallas - 1872
...We may conclude our account of climbing plants with the following remarks by Mr. Darwin : — •" It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...this power only when it is of some advantage to them, but that this is of comparatively rare occurrence, as they are affixed to the ground and food is brought...
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The Popular Science Monthly, Volumen2

1873
...trees. "We may conclude our account of climbing plants with the following remarks by Mr. Darwin : " It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...this power only when it is of some advantage to them, but that this is of comparatively rare occurrence, as they are affixed to the ground, and food is brought...
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The Movements and Habits of Climbing Plants

Charles Darwin - 1875 - 208 páginas
...most climbers depend, is inherent, though undeveloped, in almost every plant in the vegetable kingdom. It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...rare occurrence, as they are affixed to the ground, aud food is brought to them by the air and rain. We see how high in the scale of organization a plant...
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Nature, Volumen13

1876
...spontaneous " power of motion of some plants and that possessed by animals, which he sums up as follows : — "It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...and food is brought to them by the air and rain." In the present work Mr. Darwin makes'ample reference to the light that has been thrown on the habits...
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Charles Darwin's Works: The movements and habits of climbing plants

Charles Darwin - 1876
...climbers depend, is inherent, though undeveloped, in almost every plant .in the vegetable kingdom. It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are...ground, and food is brought to them by the air and rain. We see how high in the scale of organization a plant may rise, when we look at one of the more perfect...
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