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When others wanted to stay at home the Princess would howdy to accompany the hoste s to garden parties or functions in the hannherad. She did not, like so many guests, expect that H. Wilis toimuse her. On the contrary, she did her part of the weitertwinings, and in the evening would sing a song, play the piano, or

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wanted with her little carriage, Richmond's gift to her whanh tre of age. She is a first-class whip, and although she due mod bune, understandy more about horses than many so-called

Of dancing she is fairly fond, but the late hours in the long drive home after London balls have to a great extent while lori liste for that amusement. Like her father, the Princess is

At White Lodge she looks after her own garden and

fernery. She understands more than a little about botany and knows all the flowers in her own garden. She often plays a game of bowls with her friends when they come over to pay a call. She is a fair player, and quite keen to win.

In dress the taste of the Princess is essentially feminine. No attempt is ever made to copy masculine ways, nor is such a fashion likely to receive any encouragement from her. Dainty and pretty things she delights in. She likes to have her clothes well made and properly fitted, but does not countenance any extravagance of fashion or design. Bonnets seem to please her more than hats. Like her Royal mother, the Princess takes the greatest care that her clothes are purchased from shops that pay fair wages and do not overwork their hands. While not discarding French silks and French artificial flowers, she will, if possible, purchase English silks and English artificial flowers. She inherits the late Duchess of Cambridge's taste for jewellery, and greatly values the jewels she has had presented to her from time to time. With her wedding gifts of this kind she is immensely pleased.

Her natural desire to learn has received careful fostering at the hands of Mdlle. Lricka. Soon after this lady came a course of reading was mapped out, which has been studiously adhered to for the last seven years, with the result that the Princess has an intimate knowledge of history, both p.st and present. French, German, and English are all alike to Princess May. She can converse fluently in either one or the other language. Novel-reading does not interest her very much--that is to say, novels of a frivolous kind. But with the works of the great novelists she is, of course, acquainted. On her book-shelves you will find no uncut and dusty books, but neatly cut edges and well turned pages. Her favourite authors are Tennyson, Carlyle, Emerson, and George Eliot. She is very fond of well-bound books, and values highly all presentation copies. The works of Macaulay, Froude, Lamb, John Morley, Motley, Molière, Goethe, Dante, occupy prominent positions on her book-shelves. Her method is to read something every day, even if it be only a page, and then to discuss what she has read. With her companion-governess she talks French and German, and, according to arrangement, the discussion takes place in either one language or the other. Mdlle. Bricka is a very broad-minded woman, and thinks that as princesses are women, they should know as much as possible about what appertains to women. She does not believe that a book and everything is in its place. These are qualities indispensable to people of great position, and it must be very gratifying to the public to know that Princess May possesses them. Method, too, is another of her qualities. With her there is no such thing as hurry; each duty has its own time apportioned to it, and these times are never allowed to overlap unless it be on the occasion of some public function or under the pressing necessity of a domestic call. One occupation, however, always commands the Princess's time, and that is amusing her brothers. No matter whether it be to play an accompaniment, to take a drive, go for a walk, or join in a game, Princess May is always ready to fall in with her brothers' plans, or take part in their conversation.

Not long ago I was staying in a country house with Princess May and was much struck with her wish to fall in with every plan of her hostess and her anxiety not to give any trouble. She was always one of the first down to breakfast, and never late for dinner. Of course these are small matters, but they go far to show how she carries her love of order and method into every-day life, and her constant consideration for others.

In the evening her conversation would generally turn upon some topic of the day, and the knowledge she displayed showed that she had carefully read her newspapers and was much interested in public affairs. She would frequently wander off with a daughter of the house to see some poor person in the neighbourhood. When others were idle Princess May was always busy. Time, which seemed to hang so heavily on the hands of many of the visitors, seemed to be all too short for her. She was never bored, but took an interest in everything. When others wanted to stay at home the Princess would always be ready to accompany the hostess to garden parties or functions in the neighbourhood. She did not like so many guests, expect that everyone was to amuse her. On the contrary, she did her part of the entertaining, and in the evening would sing a song, play the piano, or join in a game.

Driving is a favourite occupation, and the surrounding districts are well acquainted with her little carriage, Richmond's gift to her when she came of age. She is a first-class whip, and although she does not hunt, understands more about horses than many so-called hunting women. Of dancing she is fairly sond, but the late hours and the long drive home after London balls have to a great extent shaken her taste for that amusement. Like her father, the Princess is fond of flowers. At White Lodge she looks after her own garden and fernery. She understands more than a little about botany and knows all the flowers in her own garden. She often plays a game of bowls with her friends when they come over to pay a call. She is a fair player, and quite keen to win.

In dress the taste of the Princess is essentially feminine. No attempt is ever made to copy masculine ways, nor is such a fashion likely to receive any encouragement from her. Dainty and pretty things she delights in. She likes to have her clothes well made and properly fitted, but does not countenance any extravagance of fashion or design. Bonnets seem to please her more than hats. Like her Royal mother, the Princess takes the greatest care that her clothes are purchased from shops that pay fair wages and do not overwork their hands. While not discarding French silks and French artificial flowers, she will, if possible, purchase English silks and English artificial flowers. She inherits the late Duchess of Cambridge's taste for jewellery, and greatly values the jewels she has had presented to her from time to time. With her wedding gifts of this kind she is immensely pleased.

Her natural desire to learn has received careful fostering at the hands of Malle. Lricka. Soon after this lady came a course of reading was mapped out, which has been studiously adhered to for the last seven years, with the result that the Princess has an intimate knowledge of history, both p.st and present. French, German, and English are all alike to Princess May. She can converse fluently in either one or the other language. Novel-reading does not interest her very much-that is to say, novels of a frivolous kind. But with the works of the great novelists she is, of course, acquainted. On her book-shelves you will find no uncut and dusty books, but neatly cut edges and well turned pages. Her favourite authors are Tennyson, Carlyle, Emerson, and George Eliot. She is very fond of well-bound books, and values highly all presentation copies. The works of Macaulay, Froude, Lamb, John Morley, Motley, Molière, Goethe, Dante, occupy prominent positions on her book-shelves. Her method is to read something every day, even if it be only a page, and then to discuss what she has read. With her companion-governess she talks French and German, and, according to arrangement, the discussion takes place in either one language or the other. Mdlle. Bricka is a very broad-minded woman, and thinks that as princesses are women, they should know as much as possible about what appertains to women. She does not believe that a book

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