The Wonders of Plant Life Under the Microscope

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G.P. Putnam's sons, 1883 - 248 páginas

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Página 70 - The universality of the appearance of these simple forms of fungi upon all spots favourable to their development, has given rise to the belief that they are spontaneously produced by decaying substances, but there is no occasion for this mode of accounting for it, since the extraordinary means adopted by nature for the production and diffusion of the germs of these plants adequately suffices to explain the facts of the case. "The number of sporules which any one fungus may develope is almost incalculable...
Página 27 - I see no reason whatever that justice may not be done to the few fragments of soul and tatters of understanding which they may really possess. I have sometimes perhaps felt a little uneasy at Exeter Change from contrasting the monkeys with the...
Página 27 - I feel myself so much at my ease about the superiority of mankind — I have such a marked and decided contempt for the understanding of every baboon I have yet seen— I feel so sure that the blue ape without a tail will never rival us in poetry, painting, and music, that I see no reason whatever why justice may not be done to the few fragments of soul and tatters of understanding which they may really possess.
Página 203 - ... the flower ; and that the object of the flap and its sugar is also to attract insects, but with a very different result, cannot be doubted. It is hence conceivable that this marvellous plant lures insects to its flowers for one object, and feeds them while it uses them to fertilize itself, and that, this accomplished, some of its benefactors are thereafter lured to its pitchers for the sake of feeding itself...

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