The Edinburgh Journal of Science, Volumen1

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Thomas Clark, 1829

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Página 34 - IV. In experimental philosophy, we are to look upon propositions collected by general induction from phenomena as accurately, or very nearly true, notwithstanding any contrary hypothesis that may be imagined, till such time as other phenomena occur, by which they may either be made more accurate, or liable to exceptions...
Página 308 - A number perished, who sunk with their boats in the river. A bursting of the earth just below the village of New Madrid, arrested this mighty stream in its course, and caused a reflux of its waves, by which in a little time a great number of boats were swept by the ascending current into the mouth of the Bayou, carried out and left upon the dry earth, when the accumulating waters of the river had again cleared their current. There...
Página 308 - And they remark that the shocks were clearly distinguishable into two classes ; those in which the motion was horizontal, and those in which it was perpendicular. The latter were attended with...
Página 311 - Molecules, appear to be spherical, or nearly so, and to be between l-20,000dth and l-30,000dth of an inch in diameter; and that other particles of considerably greater and various size, and either of similar or of very different figure, also present analogous motions in like circumstances.
Página 311 - ... extremely minute particles of solid matter, whether obtained from organic or inorganic substances, when suspended in pure water, or in some other aqueous fluids, exhibit motions for which I am unable to account, and which, from their irregularity and seeming independence, resemble in a remarkable degree the less rapid motions of some of the simplest animalcules of infusions.
Página 13 - Methodi naturalis fragmenta studiose inquirenda sunt. Primum et ultimum hoc in Botanicis desideratum est" (§ 77); „Methodus naturalis est ultimus finis Botanices
Página 322 - The centre of this aperture must be in the common axis of the lenses ; and the image of the perforation formed by the large lens must be brought, by proper adjustment of the distance of that lens, into the same plane as the object to be examined. With a microscope so constructed, the author has seen the finest striae and serratures upon the scales of the lepisma and podura, and the scales upon a gnat's wing, with a degree of delicate perspicuity not attainable with any other microscope he has tried....
Página 307 - Large lakes of twenty miles in extent were made in an hour. Other lakes were drained. The whole country, to the mouth of the Ohio in one direction, and to the St. Francis in the other, including a front of three hundred miles, was convulsed to such a degree as to create lakes and islands, the number of which is not...
Página 319 - In the illumination of microscopic objects, whatever light is collected and brought to the eye, beyond that which is fully commanded by the object-glasses, tends rather to impede than to assist distinct vision. " My endeavour has been, to collect as much of the admitted light as can be done by simple means, to a focus in the same plane as the object to be examined. For this purpose, I have used, with success, a plane mirror to direct the light, and a plano-convex lens to collect it, the plane side...
Página 345 - ... generally called gooseberry bottles. Having got them properly cleaned, and the fruit ready picked, (which should not be too ripe,) fill such of them as you intend doing at one time, as full as they will hold, so as to admit the cork going in, frequently shaking the fruit down whilst filling. When done, fit the corks to each bottle, and stick them lightly in, so as to be easily taken out when the fruit is sufficiently scalded, which may be done either in a copper, or large kettle...

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