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With this amount a channel had been dredged 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water, connecting the east end of the bay with Dead Horse Inlet, and the interior channel dredged 60 feet wide and 54 feet deep at mean low water, for a distance of 3,400 feet, from the town of Sheepshead toward Dead Horse Inlet. The first-mentioned channel, from a survey in 1887, was observed to have not maintained itself, having contracted to a width of 60 feet with an average depth of 51 feet, mean low water; the condition of the more recently dredged interior channel, however, has been found by an examination, made in 1891, to be highly satisfactory. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$215. 74 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

43. 17 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended......

172.57 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 8, 200.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 3.)

4. Arthur Kill, Nero York and New Jersey.- A history of this improvement, which originated by special resolution of the Committee of Commerce in the Senate, is given in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers, 1859, Part I, page 819.

The improvement consists in the removal of a point of land near and to the south of the Staten Island Bridge, for the purpose of straightening the channel, in order that the currents may be directed more truly in a direction perpendicular to the draw span of the bridge, thus facilitating the passage of long tows.

A statement of condemnation proceedings for acquiring to the United States the land needed for this improvement will be found in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1890, Part I, page 843.

The total amount expended on this improvement to June 30, 1891, was $10,340.59; with this amount payments had been made in the condemnation proceedings alluded to above, in the part purchase of the Government tug at present on the Raritan River, and in dredging off about one-half an acre of the obstruction known as Steep Point," with a resulting increase of 150 feet in the channel width and with a uniform depth of 13 feet at mean low water where the land was originally 6 feet above that plane.

The available funds appropriated by the act of September 19, 1890, were covered by a contract made with the Atlantic Dredging Company on March 21, 1891, which was completed June 25, 1891, as stated in my last annual report. This work resulted in an additional channel width of 60 feet, with the same mean low-water depth as stated in the preceding paragraph, and another half acre of land was removed, making a total of about one acre removed under the project and giving a total channel width at this point of 710 feet. No work has been done during the fiscal year.

The commerce was reported for the calendar year 1890 to be 6,945,604 tous, against 6,917,635 tons for 1891. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended ...

$6, 659. 41 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5, 905.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

751.41 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

5,751.41

66

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project. $1,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 4.)

5. Channel between Staten Island and New Jersey. Before this improvement was undertaken by the United States there was a navigable channel having a minimum depth of 9.2 feet from the deep water in Newark Bay to Elizabethport.

The first project for the improvement of this channel was made in 1873. This provided for dredging it to a depth of 16 feet for a width of 150 feet at its shallowest part, and protecting the cut by parallel dikes. The estimated cost of this was $143,210.

This project was changed in 1880 so as to dredge a channel 400 feet wide and 13 feet deep over the middle 200 feet of its width, leaving it but 12 feet deep over the remaining widths of 100 feet on each side. The estimated cost of this work was $125,705. In addition to this it was proposed, should it be found necessary, to build four detached dikes along the line of the channel, two on the north and two on the south side, the estimated cost of which was $60,000, bringing the total estimated cost of the proposed improvement up to $185,705. Subsequently it was decided to give the channel 13 feet depth for its full width of 400 feet, increasing the estimate to 8210,000.

A modification of this project, having in view the abandonment of the dikes, was submitted May 9, 1889, and was approved by Department letter dated May 15, and a further moditication, calling for a uniform channel depth of 14 feet at mean low water over the entire width of 400 feet, was approved October 20, 1890.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $190,611.06.

With this amount 2,237 feet of dike was built, the channel dredged throughout its entire projected length to a mean low-water depth of 13 feet, with widths varying from 300 to 350 feet, and in the vicinity of the bend at the Corner Stake Light, for a distance of 3,000 feet, the width had been increased to 400 feet, with mean low-water depths of from 13 to 14 feet. This latter work was done under contract with Thomas H. Benton, dated March 23, 1891, and has resulted in considerable improvement of the channel in regard to width, which, because of the sharp turn at the Corner Stake Light, should be as great as is consistent with the maintaining power of the current.

The expenditures during the past fiscal year amount to $6,665.32, $5,891.32 of which was an outstanding liability under the above-mentioned contract, which was completed June 29, 1891, the remaining $774 having been for office expenses.

No work has been done during the past fiscal year other than office work on the maps and records.

The amount of commerce reported for the calendar year 1891 is 9,219,481 tons against 9,170,514 tons for 1890. July 1, 1891, balance wexpended...

$8, 388.94 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

6, 665. 32 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

1, 723. 62 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

15, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

16, 723. 62 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 46,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sertions 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 5.)

6. Passaic Rirer, Neve Jersey.--This river is being improved under two separate projects, the first applying to the river below Center Street Bridge, Newark, to and beyond the shoals in Newark Bay, a distance of 78 miles, and the second to the upper course of the river from Center Street Bridge as far as Passaic, a distance of 8 miles.

a. Below Newark.The lower portion of the river from Center Street Bridge to Newark Bay was first surveyed by the Engineer Department in 1879. The greatest depth in the channel at a point above the Elbow Beacon was only 7.1 feet, and in many places the greatest depth was 7.5 feet at mean low water.

A project was adopted, based on this survey, providing for obtaining by diking and dredging a channel 200 feet wide and 10 feet deep at mean low water from the Center Street Bridge to Newark Bay, at a cost of $232,875.

This project was modified in 1881, pursuant to the river and harbor act of that year, providing for extending the dike at the mouth of the river into the bay, a distance of 12,000 feet, and for dredging a channel across the shoal in Newark Bay 200 feet wide and 10 feet deep at mean low water, increasing the original estimate to $353,875.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $200,186.85.

With this amount 6,205 feet of dike had been built and the channel through the shoal in the bay, and the channel up the river to and 1,423 feet beyond the Newark and New York Railroad Bridge, dredged to the full dimensions as required by the adopted project. Thence for a • distance of 1,150 feet upstream the channel had been redredged and given a width of 180 feet, and from this point to Lister Dock regulated to a width of 100 feet, with a uniform depth of 10 feet at mean low water throughout.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amount to $33,505.33. With this amount the channel between the Toll Bridge and Center Street Bridge, Newark, from Point-no-Point to Lister Dock was widened 100 feet, with a mean low-water depth of 10 to 11 feet for a distance of 4,000 feet, giving a total width of 200 feet throughout this distance, and, for an additional 3,000 feet, the existing 100-foot channel was increased in width by 125 to 150 feet, with the same depth, giving a total width of 225 to 250 feet; a bar below the Zinc Works Dock removed to the same mean low-water depth, with a width of 120 feet for a distance of 1,600 feet, and urgent necessary repairs made to the dike in Newark Bay.

The commerce of this river is reported for the year ending December 31, 1891, to be 1,528,565 tons against 1,431,045 tons for 1890, an increase of 44,520 tons. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$39, 313. 15 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

33, 505. 33 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

5, 807.82 b. Above Newark.-Before its improvement was undertaken the upper part of the river had a navigable 6-foot channel, except at Middle, Belleville, Rutherford Park, and Holzman bars, where the depths were 4.5 feet, 3,9 feet, 3 feet, and 3.5 feet, respectively.

The project of improvement was adopted in 1872 and provided for a channel across and above the shoals from 74 to 6 feet deep, mean low water, and from 200 to 50 feet wide, to be obtained by dredging and diking, at a cost of $123,921. It was modified in 1885 by extending the channel below Middle Bar 1,500 feet to the Erie Railroad Bridge, increasing the estimate to $129,000, which was further increased in

1886 to $133,762. A further moclification, to include the removal of Third River Bar, the redredging of bars formed by freshets, and removal of bowlders at various points in the river, increasing the estimate to $193,822, was approved October 6, 1890. At the same time that portion of the project which contemplated dredging between Middle Bar and the Erie Railroad Bridge was annulled.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $130,134.67 and channels of the requisite depth had been dredged from 60 to 75 feet wide, excepting through Third River Bar, which is of recent formation.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amount to $5,542.39, with which a channel has been dredged through Third River Bar 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water for a distance of 800 feet; below the bar the channel was increased in width by 40 feet, with the same depth for a distance of 700 feet, and by 20 feet for a further distance of 245 feet, giving a continuous channel through this reach having a width of 100 feet and depth of 6 feet, mean low water.

The last complete return of the commerce of this river was for the calendar year 1889, 315,437 tons; for the calendar year 1891 it is reported at 322,211 tons. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$8,715. 33 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

5, 512. 39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

3, 172.94 As the river and harbor act approved July 13, 1892, makes the appropriation for the two reaches of the river under one heading, the following consolidated money statement for Passaic River is presented: July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$48, 028. 48 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

39,047.72 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

8, 980. 76 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

45,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

53, 980.76 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 124, 347.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 6.)

7. Elizabeth River, New Jersey.--This stream, which is 25 miles in length from its mouth to the head of navigation at Broad street, Elizabeth, has a width of from 50 to 90 feet, and before its improvement the wharves in the city could only be reached at high water by vessels drawing less than 4 feet; its commerce was estimated at 45,000 tons annually. The range of the tide was about 4.7 feet at its mouth and 3.4 feet at Bridge street.

The project for the improvement was adopted in 1878 and provides for obtaining, by dredging, a channel 60 feet wide and 7 feet deep at high water from the mouth of the river to the head of navigation, at an estimated cost of $25,530; this was increased in 1882 to $43,160, the increase being due to advanced prices.

The amount expended under this project to June 30, 1891, was $27,265.

With this amount the channel had been dredged to the required depth to within 1,000 feet of Broad Street Bridge. The condition of the river has deteriorated since work was suspended in 1883.

Work under contract, dated March 23, 1891, was begun July 1, 1891, and completed October 3, 1891, the amount of material removed being 6,917 cubic yards. Under this contract shoals were removed from the river at the bend above South street, at South Street Bridge, at John street, at the bend in the river below John street, and at the New York and Long Branch Railroad Bridge, to a depth of 7 feet at mean high water, with widths of 30 to 50 feet, giving a 7-foot mean bigh-water channel with widths varying from 30 to 50 feet, from the mouth of the river to within 900 feet of Bridge Street Bridge, in the town of Elizabeth.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amount to $4,621.20 for dredging under contract and administration. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$1, 735.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4, 621. 20 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

113. 80 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 113. 80 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 6, 160.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 7.)

8. Rahiay River, Neue Jersey.-In its original condition the Rahway River had a depth of 8 feet and more at mean high water from its mouth to Bricktown, 37 miles; 7 feet to Edgar Dock, 43 miles; 4.4 feet to Milton Avenue Bridge, 13 miles; and 4 feet to Main Street Bridge, 5 miles, in the town of Ral way. Its commerce was estimated at 120,000 tons, and three attempts had been made to establish a line of steamboats on the river, but had faileil on account of the bad condition of the stream,

The original project for its improvement was adopted in 1878 and provided for dredging a channel 125 feet wide and 8 feet deep at high water from Bricktown to Milton Avenue Bridge and 100 feet wide from that point to Main Street Bridge. The tide rises about 5 feet at the mouth and 4 feet at the head of navigation.

The amount expended on this improvement to June 30, 1891, was $37,000.

With the above amount the chamel had been given a depth of 7 feet at mean high water and width of from 100 to 50 feet to within 550 feet of the head of navigation. It has, however, not proved permanent. The commerce of the river had not increased, though freight rates to Rahway had been materially reduced as a result of the improvement of the stream.

There has been no appropriation for this work since 1882 and there have been no funds for expenditure since the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890.

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... $29, 250.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 8.)

9. Raritan River, New Jersey.—Before its improvement by the United States the Raritan River had a depth of 8.5 feet at " The Stakes,” 3 miles; of 6.5 feet at the “Middle Grounds,” 44 miles; of 7.5 feet at Whitehead Sand Dock, 8.4 miles, and between this point and New Brunswick, 124 miles above the mouth, the channel was obstructed by a nunber of rocky shoals, with depths of from 8.4 to 6,9 feet at mean low water. The

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