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In 1873 and 1881 a channel was dredged with appropriations aggregating $15,500, from outside the bar to the wharves; the depth made was 6 feet at mean low water. Certain portions of the channel filled in again, reducing the former depth to 4 feet.

The present project for improvement, adopted in 1890, provides for a channel 6 feet deep at low water, 75 feet wide across the bar, and 60 feet wide to Davis's Wharf at North East. The estimated cost is $5,140.

At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $17,806:15 had been expended in the improvement of this river, of which sum $2,306.15 was expended under the present project. On that date a channel existed across the bar 5,700 feet long, 40 feet wide, and 6 feet deep, ending in deep water at the junction of Stony Run. It was too early then to give any statements what effect the opening of this channel had upon shipping, which has ever been very limited. Nothing was done during the past fiscal year. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended......

$2, 393. 85 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

2, 332. 22 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

61. 63 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

2, 610.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

2, 701.63 (See Appendix H 9.)

10. Elk River, Maryland.-This river is a tributary of Chesapeake Bay and is navigable for 17 miles as far as the town of Elkton, in Cecil County, where the tide rises on an average 24 feet.

Improvements were begun in 1873, when a project was made for a 6-foot low-water channel from 50 to 70 feet wide in the river proper, from the county bridge at Elkton to Cedar Point and in Little Elk River from the junction to Bennett's Wharf, and for 3,300 feet of diking as a partial protection. The project was completed in 1884. The result was a channel 80 feet wide over the bar near Cedar Point and 70 feet wide up to the bridge, with a general depth of 7 feet below mean low water. Before improvements were begun the least depth in the channel was 14 feet.

The present project for improvement, proposed in a report on a survey made in 1889, and adopted under an appropriation of $10,000, made September 19, 1890, provides for an 8-foot low-water channel, 100 feet • wide, from the county bridge at Scott's Wharf to the clubhouse opposite Cedar Point, a distance of nearly 3 miles. The estimated cost is $24,000.

During the past fiscal year the channel was improved as proposed for a length of 3,800 feet below the county bridge, and a shoal below the mouth of Little Elk River was removed to the required width and depth. The harbor space was thereby greatly increased. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$9, 942. 18 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

8, 816.41

1, 095. 77 5,000.00

6, 095.77

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892
Åmount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...
Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project......
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix II 10.)

9,000.00

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11. Fairlee Creek, Maryland. The original depth at the mouth before improvements were begun was 2 feet at low tide; within the creek it was about 5 feet. Navigation was, and still is, carried on by a few flatbottomed, so called, lime boats and by one small schooner.

The existing project is for a 7 foot low-water channel, 100 feet wide, from deep water in Chesapeake Bay to a point about 3 miles above the mouth of the creek, the estimated cost being $15,558.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $10,000 had been expended and the channel, as proposed, from deep water in the bay to the mouth had been completed, and a portion of the channel inside the creek had been dredged to the required depth for a distance of 4,738 feet, but only for a width of 50 feet.

Although the availability of the creek for the purposes of navigation and commerce was measurably increased by the improvement lately made, there are as yet no signs that indicate any increase in the very limited commerce as it now exists.

There were no operations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$115. 35 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

92. 88 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

22. 47 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 5, 558.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H 11.)

12. Chester River, Maryland, from Crumpton to Jones Landing. This river is a tidal stream, 40 miles long, forming the boundary line between Kent and Queen Anne counties, Eastern Shore of Maryland, and flows into Chesapeake Bay. It is navigable for 33 miles for vessels drawing 6 feet of water at low tide. The minimum depth of water within the last 7 miles of the river is 3 feet, but the tide rises on an average 2.1 feet at the lower end of this section. Portions of the river situated farther down have previously been improved by the United States.

The project for improvement proposed in a report on a survey made in 1889, and adopted under an appropriation made September 19, 1890, provides for dredging a channel 6 feet deep at mean low water, and 60 feet wide from Crumpton, in Queen Anne County, to a point 1 mile below Millington, in Kent County, at an estimated cost of $12,750. The length of the section to be improved is about 6 miles.

At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, preparations had been made for beginning the improvement under the first appropriation and the work had been let. Operations were begun on October 28, 1891, the contract being completed February 8, 1892. The result was that the 4 miles of river between Crumpton and Kirby Landing were cleared of all obstructions, a channel 6 feet deep at low water and 60 feet wide having been dredged through all the existing shoals and bars. The channel is still in good condition, and a number of grain boats have commenced to make regular trips from Kirby Landing. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$1,992. 35 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

3, 088.58 July 1, 1892, balance inexpended....

1, 903. 77 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year cuding June 30, 1893..

4, 903. 77

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project $4,750.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sectious 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix II 12.)

13. Choptank River, Maryland.-Before improvements were begun in 1879 the depth of water between Denton and Greensboro varied from 2 to 8 feet at low water. Navigation, carried on by small sailing vessels, extended only to 3 miles above Denton. Upon the remaining 5 miles to Greensboro all freight had to be transported in scows.

A project for improvement was made in 1880 for an 8-foot low-water channel 75 feet wide, the estimated cost being $79,000. The project was adopted the same year, an appropriation of $5,000 having been made on June 14. During the three following years the channel was dredged to a depth of only 6 and 7 feet, on account of the small appropriations made for the work and the prevailing high prices for dredging. Since 1885 the channel has been dredged to the approved depth of 8 feet, its width being still restricted to 40 feet.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the sum of $37,513.63 had been expended in dredging, and a continuous channel 40 feet wide now exists between Denton and Greensboro with a depth of 8 feet, except for a certain portion 13 miles in length, in which the minimum depth is from 5 to 7 feet. The improvements so far have been of great benefit to the country at Greensboro and below, and during the past five years a regular steamboat line has been in operation between this town and Baltimore.

There were no operations during the past fiscal year. Contract has been made to expend in dredging during the summer of 1892 the $7,500 appropriated September 19, 1890. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$7, 486.37 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

281. 65 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

7, 204, 72 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

6,500.00 July 1, 1892, balance available...

704.72 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

3, 704, 72 Amonnt (estimated) required for completion of existing project

20,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H 13.)

14. Cambridge Harbor, Maryland.-The entrance to this harbor was originally 44 feet deep at low tide. The average depth in the harbor was about 3 feet; in a few places it was 8 and 9 feet. The bar at the entrance was impassable during strong northwesterly winds for vessels drawing 3 feet of water. The local commerce was carried on by a limited number of sailing vessels of the smallest class and by one steamer of light draft.

Previous to 1871 the citizens of Cambridge had made an effort to increase the availability of the harbor by expending $7,500 in dredging. In that year the improvement of the harbor was begin by the General Government under a project completed in 1879, resulting in a channel 100 feet wide across the bar which was dredged, together with certain portions of the inner harbor, to a depth of 8 feet below mean low water. During the year 1884 this channel was slightly widened. At the close

of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1888, 832,500 had been expended by the General Governinent.

A new project based upon a survey made in 1887 was adopted in 1888, providing for a channel 12 feet deep at low water and 150 feet wide from the Choptank River to the railroad wharf and for dredging the inner harbor below the drawbridge to a depth of 10 feet and above the bridge to a depth of 8 feet below low water, at an estimate cost of $17,736.60. At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the sum of $4,918.72 had been expended in the execution of this project, resulting in a channel 12 feet deep at low water and 88 feet wide across the bar as far as the Maryland Steamboat Company's Wharf, and thence 22 feet wide to the railroad whart. Vessels drawing 113 feet of water that formerly could not enter the harbor at all can now come up to this wharf without much difficulty.

There were no operations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, as the expenditure of the appropriation of $5,000 made September 19, 1890, is being delayed by the contemplated construction of a wider draw in the county bridge across the harbor. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$5, 081.28 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

8. 72 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

5, 072. 56 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

7, 737.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

12, 809.56 (See Appendix II 14.)

15. Wicomico River, Maryland.-Wicomico River flows in a southwesterly direction through Wicomico County, Eastern Shore of Maryland, into Tangier Sound, Chesapeake Bay. Its tidal portion is 23 miles long. Salisbury, the county seat, is at the head of navigation, and the tide rises there about 3 feet. The original depth in the river near Salisbury was 18 inches before the improvement of the river was begun in 1872. Under a project made in that year and completed in 1885, $50,000 was expended, resulting in a channel 7 feet deep at mean low water and from 75 to 100 feet wide at and below Salisbury.

The present project for improvement, necessitated by the increased business of the port, was submitted in a report upon a survey made in 1889 and was adopted in 1890. It provides for a channel 9 feet deep at mean low water, 100 feet in width from near Fruitland wharf to the drawbridge in Salisbury, at an estimated cost of $23,000. The length of the proposed channel is about 3 miles.

The first work under the new project was done during the past fiscal year. A channel about 30 feet wide and of the approved depth, 9 feet, was dredged from Goose Island wharf to the drawbridge in Salisbury, for a distance of 9,250 feet. The increased lepth afforded at once great relief to deep-draft vessels during low tides. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$10, 911.63 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

10, 145.67 July 1, 1892, balance wexpended

768.96 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

6,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

7, 268,96 Amount (estimatel) reqnired for completion of existing project

6,700.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 :uci 1867. (See Appendix II 15.)

16. Manokin River, Maryland.-Manokin River is a small tidal tributary of Tangier Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and flows in a southwesterly direction through Somerset County on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Its length is about 18 miles, the lower 10 miles forming a wide estuary. The main channel is interrupted at the head of the estuary for nearly 3 miles by shallow mud flats, which rendered the upper river almost useless for the purposes of navigation. The average rise and fall of the tide near the obstruction is 2.6 feet.

The project for improvement proposed in a report on a survey made in 1889 and adopted under an appropriation of $7,500 made by act approved September 19, 1890, provides for dredging a channel 6 feet deep at mean low water, and 100 feet wide, from Locust Point to Sharp Point, embracing the section called the “Mud Flats," at an estimated cost of $30,000.

With the appropriation above referred to, a cut was made during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, at the section indicated, 13,515 feet long, 30 feet wide, and 5 feet deep at low tide, at an expense of $7,360.12.

There were no operations during the past fiscal year. The dredged cut, which, after being completed, enabled the steamboat plying between Princess Anne and Deal Island to make regular trips, is reported to be in fair condition. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$139. 88 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

10.80 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

129.08 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

7,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

7, 629.08 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 15,000.00 Subinitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H 16.)

17. Onancock Harbor, Virginia.Onancock Harbor or Onancock River, is about 5 miles long and flows through the western portion of Accomac County, Va., into Chesapeake Bay. At the town of Onaicock, which is situated at the head of the river, the depth of water was originally 4 feet at low tide. At the mouth of the river, where a bar forms the most serious obstruction, the original depth was 5 feet. The average rise and fall of the tide is about 2 feet.

During the years 1880 and 1881, $8,000 was expended in dredging a channel 100 feet wide across the bar to a depth of 8 feet below mean low water, and in dredging the shoals at Onancock and above Wise Point to a depth of 7 feet. The improvements were of great benefit to the shipping in the river, but the channel at the bar slowly filled up again to nearly its original depth.

The present project for improvement proposed in a report on a survey made in 1889, and adopted under an appropriation of $6,000, made September 19, 1890, provides for dredging a channel 300 feet wide at the outer bar and 200 feet wide at the inner bar, called the “middle ground,” both to a depth of 8 feet below mean low water, at an estimated cost of $12,511. The first work under the new project was done during the past fiscal year. A channel was dredged across the outer bar for a width of 150 feet and across the inner bar for a width of 100 feet, both to the required depth of 8 feet. Since then no delays have

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