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the depth was made 8 feet to anticipate probable shoaling from freshets, pending the construction of a dike proposed to be built under future appropriations. The bars thus improved were the most serious obstructions, and the work done has afforded material relief to navigation. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$8, 394.99 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

8, 188.98 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

206.01 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

8.00 July 1, 1892, balance available...

198.01 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

5, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 198.01 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project. 30, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 3.)

4. Aquia Creek, Virginia.-Aquia Creek is a tributary of the Potomac River, which it enters about 41 miles below Washington, D. C. The stream is about 7 miles long, and in 1872 its navigation was chiefly obstructed by shoals between the mouth and the “ Narrows" 4.5 miles above. Here the creek takes the character of a wide bay, from 1,000 to 6,000 feet wide, while the depths of water ranged from 2 to 4 feet over an almost continuous shoal of soft mud. Above the 6. Narrows" the creek is from 60 to 200 feet wide, with a depth of from 2 to 17 feet, the shoaler portions being near the head of navigation. The stream is crossed by a bridge of the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad about 3 miles above the mouth, the draw of the bridge being but 28 feet wide.

From 1872 to 1878 appropriations amounting to $10,000 were made by Congress, and the navigation improved by dredging a channel from 40 to 50 feet wide and from 4 to 5 feet deep through the shoaler parts of the creek, chiefly above the railroad bridge.

A new survey of the creek was provided for in the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, and was made in 1889. The channel dredged from 1872 to 1878 was found to have maintained its dimensions between the railroad bridge and the “Narrows,” but at other places it had filled in. The general depth of water in the creek remained substantially as in 1872. Estimates for improving the navigation were submitted January 18, 1890, and an appropriation of $10,000 made by the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890.

The project for the improvement, approved December 4, 1890, proposes a channel 80' feet wide and 6 feet deep, dredged through the shoals where less than 6 feet is found between the mouth of the creek and the “ Narrows."

At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $500 had been expended. A channel so feet wide and 6 feet deep had then been dredged from Thorny Point, at the lower end of the shoal, for a distance of about 2,670 feet toward the railroad bridge.

During the fiscal year endig June 30, 1892, the channel was completed up to the railroad bridge, a distance of 12,280 feet from the point of commencement, the full dimensions required by the project_80 feet in width and 6 feet in depth-having been secured. The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $8,889.05.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$9, 500.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

8, 889.05 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

610.95 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

115.00 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

495.95 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 495.95 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 25, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 4.)

5. Harbor at Breton Bay, Leonardtoun, Maryland.The navigation of the head of Breton Bay was obstructed in 1874 by a shoal extending from the 9-foot curve in the bay to Leonardtown, a distance of about 1 mile, the least depth on the shoal being 5 feet at low tide. The original project, adopted in 1878, contemplated dredging a channel 150 feet wide and 9 feet deep through the shoal with a suitable turning basin at the wharf. In 1885 the project was amended to provide for a channel 200 feet wide and 10 feet deep, with a turning basin 400 feet wide by 800 feet long. In 1890 the original project was resumed, as this appeared to be sufficient for the navigation of the bay. At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, $32,500 had been expended. The condition of the improvement at the close of the last preceding dredging operations (in March, 1889) was as follows: The basin at the Leonardtown wharf was 645 feet long by 370 feet wide. From the lower end of the basin the channel was 150 feet wide for a distance of 1,870 feet, and for a further distance of 1,380 feet around the turn at Buzzard Point the width varied from 185 to 280 feet. The depth varied from 8.5 to 14.6 feet. The channel between Buzzard Point and the 9-foot curve in Breton Bay had not been dredged. At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $33,017.79 had been expended, and the dredging needed to complete the project was in progress.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the channel was completed from the 9-foot curve in Breton Bay to the Leonardtown wharf, in accordance with the original project, which was resumed in 1890. The channel is 9 feet deep and 150 wide, except at the turn at Buzzard Point, where the width was increased to 320 feet to facilitate the turning of steamers. The turning basin at the Leonardtown wharf is 600 feet long and 370 feet wide. No further work is required by navigation at present, and no further appropriations are recommended. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$4,482.21 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

4, 417.21 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended .

65.00 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

65.00 (See Appendix J 5.)

6. Nomini Creek, Virginia.-This stream is an important tributary of the Potomac, which it enters about 82 miles below Washington, D. C.

Navigation was obstructed in 1872 by a bar of sand and oyster shells at its mouth, over which but 3 feet could be carried at low tide, and the dangers and difficulties of passing the bar were further increased by a rapid current and cross tides. After passing the bar 8 feet can be carried to Nomini Ferry, about 4 miles above the mouth.

The original project for the improvement, adopted in 1873, provided

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for dredging a channel 100 feet wide and 9 feet deep through the bar. The project was modified in 1879 by increasing the width to 150 feet, and again in 1885 by increasing the width to 200 feet. In 1890 a further modification was made, proposing the construction of two jetties parallel to the outer channel, retaining the width of dredging at 150 feet. The total cost of this modified project was placed at $72,500. At the close of work in 1883 a channel about 100 feet wide and 9 feet deep had been dredged through the bar. During the suspension of work from 1883 to 1889 the cat was redụced in depth and width by deposits of sand. In 1889 the outer channel was widened and redredged on the westerly side for a width of 94 feet and a length of 1,470 feet, the depths being from 8.9 to 13.8 feet.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the channel at and outside of White Point was dredged, the width attained being from 130 to 150 feet, and the depth 9 feet. A riprap dike was built inside White Point to check the cross tidal current. Up to June 30, 1891, $39,947.89 had been expended.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, no work was done, the funds on hand not being sufficient for the prosecution of active operations. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$2,552. 11 June 30,1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

2, 263, 87 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

288. 24 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

10, 288. 24 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ...... 20,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 6.)

7. Patuxent River, Maryland.The present head of navigation on the Patuxent River is Bristol, Md., about 46 miles above the mouth. Prior to the commencement of the improvement navigation below Bristol was obstructed by two mud bars (1) Swann Point Bar, about 43 miles above the mouth, having a least depth of 7.8 feet, and (2) Bristol Bar, at Bristol, having least depths in front of the two wharves of 7.6 and 4.2 feet. Two other bars below, viz, Pope Shoal (24 miles above the mouth) and Warren Reach Bar (34 miles above the mouth), were mentioned in the report of the preliminary examination as worthy of survey, but they offer no obstruction to the present standard of navigation.

The original project was adopted in 1888, and contemplated dredging a cut, 200 feet wide and from 12 to 13 feet deep, through Swann Point Bar and Bristol Bar, so as to secure a permanent channel about 100 feet wide and 12 feet deep at low tide. This project was modified in 1890 so as to provide for a channel 120 feet wide and 12 feet deep (then already dredged) at Bristol Bar and a channel about 100 feet wide and 9 feet deep at Swann Point Bar, these last-named dimensions being regarded as sufficient for the present and immediately prospective demands of commerce.

At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $9,816.66 bad been expended. A channel, 120 feet wide, 12 feet deep, and 794 feet long, had been dredged at Bristol Bar, and a channel, 9 feet deep, about 100 feet wide, and about 2,250 feet long, through Swann Point Bar.

This work completes the existing project, unless it should appear

from future examinations that works of contraction are needed to maintain the channel at Swann Point Bar. At the present time no further appropriations are recommended. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended ....

$1, 184. 84 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

263. 97 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

920. 87 (See Appendix J 7.)

8. Rappahannock River, Virginia.--The obstructions to navigation of the Rappahannock River before improvement were 9 bars between Tappahannock, 41 miles above the mouth, and Fredericksburg, 106 miles above the month, over which the ruling depths were from 4 to 10.5 feet. The chief obstructions were in the 12.5 miles of river below Fredericksburg, where 7 of the bars are found. Of these bars, Fredericksburg Bar, with a least depth of 4 feet, and Spottswood Bar, 4 miles below Fredericksburg, with a least depth of 6 feet, caused the most delay to steamboats and vessels.

The original project, adopted in 1871, proposed a channel, 10 feet deep and 100 feet wide, through all the bars. This was modified in 1879 by increasing the dimensions of the channel between Port Royal and Tappahannock to 15 feet in depth and 200 feet in width to accommodate the larger class of vessels.

Up to June 30, 1891, $111,786.24 had been expended, and depths of from 8 to 9.5 feet secured through the bars between Fredericksburg and Port Royal by dredging and the construction of dikes. Wrecks and snags obstructing navigation had also been removed. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $11,193.24 has been expended. A new plant for building and repairing dikes and for snagging on the Rappahannock, Mattaponi, and Pamunkey rivers has been completed.

Channels 10 feet deep and from 40 to 80 feet wide were dredged through portions of Fredericksburg bar for the relief of steamboat navigation. A sunken scow was also removed at this bar. As each recurring freshet brings additional deposits of sand and silt into the river, the officer in charge recommends an annual appropriation of $7,500 for the maintenance of the improvement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$14, 162.83 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

11, 193. 24 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

2,969. 59 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

119.00 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

2, 850. 59 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

20,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

22, 850.59 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ....... 144,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 8.)

9. Urbana Creek, Virginia.-Urbana Creek is a tributary of the Rappahannock River, which it enters 16 miles above the mouth. Before improvement navigation was obstructed by a bar outside the mouth, over which but 6.5 feet could be carried, and a shoal within the creek having a least depth of 7 feet.

The original project adopted in 1879 provided for dredging a channel 150 feet wide and 10 feet deep through the outer bar. This project was

extended in 1883 so as to include dredging to 10 feet through a shoal within the creek near the town of Urbana.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, $18,500 had been expended. The channel through the outer bar had been dredged to a depth of 10 feet and a width of 140 feet, but owing to the action of storms the width had decreased from sand filling to 90 feet. A channel had also been dredged through the shoal within the creek from 80. to 170 feet wide and 10 feet deep, and dikes and jetties had been built along the sand spit to check the movement of sand, which tends to close the natural channel at the end of the spit.

In the river and harbor act approved September 19, 1890, an appropriation of $3,000 was made for continuing the improvement. Under this appropriation the natural channel at the mouth of the creek was widened 70 feet by dredging off the end of the sand spit. The depth made was 10 feet at low tide.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, there had been expended of this appropriation $1,859.04. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$3,000.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

1,859.04 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

1, 140.96 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

175.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

965. 96 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

3, 965. 96 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 10,080.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 9.)

10. York River, Virginia.--The Paminkey and Mattaponi rivers unite at West Point, Va., to form the York River, which is 41 miles in length and empties into Chesapeake Bay about 16 miles above Old Point, Va. Prior to the commencement of the improvement navigation was obstructed by Potopotank Bar, 9 miles below West Point, on which the ruling depth was 18.5 feet; by West Point Bar, extending about 2 miles below West Point and having a ruling depth of 15.5 feet; and by shoal water in front of the West Point wharves, at the mouth of the Pamunkey.

The original project provided for a channel 22 feet deep and 200 feet wide through these bars, with an increased width at the wharves. In 1884 the proposed channel width was increased to 400 feet, and in 1887 the project was amended so as to include the construction of a dike along the fats on the right of the channel, to contract the water way, and maintain the depth dredged, which had decreased from continued silting.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $129,910.17 had been expended in the following work: A channel 105 feet wide and 22 feet deep was dredged in 1880–81 through Potopotank Bar, which had, however, shoaled in 1890 to from 20.8 to 21.7 feet. A channel 22 feet deep and from 101 to 257 feet wide, with a center cut 24 feet deep and 40 feet wide, had been dredged at West Point Bar below the wharves, but this channel had shoaled to such an extent that the ruling depth in June, 1891, was but 18 feet.

On June 30, 1891, dredging was in progress by contract at West

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