Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

Point Bar, under the appropriation of $30,000 made September 19, 1890. At the first-mentioned date a cut 80 feet wide and 22 feet deep had been made in front of the West Point wharves, the length of the cut being about 2,700 feet. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, these dredging operations were continued, and the channel in front of the wharves widened to 160 feet. The lower end of the channel, where shoaling to 18-foot depth had occurred, was then redredged for a length of about 3,300 feet to a depth of 22 feet and a width of 160 feet, thereby affording material relief to navigation.

Great difficulty was experienced in finding suitable dumping grounds on the York River. The flats on either side of the channel are largely occupied by oyster beds whose owners object to the dumping of material or the construction of dikes. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$28, 879.83 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

16, 054. 01 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

12, 825. 82 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

35,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

47, 825. 82 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 115, 050.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 10.)

11. Mattaponi River, Virginia.-The Mattaponi River is navigable for small steamers from its mouth at West Point, Va., to Ayletts, Va., a distance of about 52 miles, and can be made navigable for barges for about 26 miles above Ayletts to Munday Bridge. The obstructions to 5.5-foot navigation are five bars below Ayletts, having ruling depths of from 2.5 to 3.6 feet, and wrecks, snags, logs, and overhanging trees. There were eight bars reported above Ayletts, but no improvement of them is proposed.

The approved project adopted in 1880 provides for a channel 40 feet wide and 5.5 feet deep through the bars below Ayletts and the removal of logs, snags, overhanging trees, wrecks, etc., as far up as Munday Bridge.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $16,296.89 had been expended in removing snags, wrecks, logs, and other obstructions between Robinson Bar and Munday Bridge, a distance of 34 miles, and in building 2,226 linear feet of dike at Robinson Bar. priation of $3,000 made September 19, 1890, was too small to be applied to dredging operations, and was applied to removing snags, leaning trees, etc., which obstructeď navigation. The plant formerly used for this purpose on the Rappahannock, Pamunkey, and Mattaponi rivers having become worn out, the construction of a new plant became necessary. At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, this plant was nearly completed.

The new plant was delivered on July 15, 1891, and after being employed on the Pamunkey River was brought to the Mattaponi, where snagging operations were commenced October 1, 1891. The work covered that part of the river between West Point and Dunkirk, the last-named place being about 6 miles above Ayletts; 165 snags, 27 logs, and 210 overhanging trees were removed. The season's work was concluded November 21, 1891, and the plant was then taken to the Rappahaunock River for use on that improvement.

ENG 92-10

The appro

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$3,003. 11 June 30, 1892, ainount exponded during fiscal year.

2, 870.50 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

132. 61 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

4,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

4, 132.61 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 16,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 11.)

12. Pamunkey River, Virginia.—The Pamunkey River has a navi. gable length of 59 miles and empties in the York River at West Point, Va. Navigation was originally obstructed by five bars in the upper part of the river and by snags, logs, and overhanging trees.

The project was adopted in 1880 and amended in 1885, and provides for channels 100 feet wide and 7 feet deep through Spring Bar and Skidmore Bar, or to a distance of 47 miles above West Point, and channels 40 feet wide and from 3 to 5 feet deep through the bars above, together with the removal of logs, wrecks, snags, and overhanging trees. On June 30, 1890, logs, snags, etc., had been removed from 22.5 miles of the river between Garlick Ferry and Hanovertown, dikes had been built at Spring Bar and Skidmore Bar, and a channel 95 feet wide and from 6 to 7 feet deep dredged through the last-named bar. The amount expended to June 30, 1890, was $18,483.64. An appropriation of $3,000 was made September 19, 1890, which was applied to the removal of snags, trees, and similar obstructions, which are annually renewed by freshets. The plant formerly used for this work having become worn out and useless, it became necessary to construct a new one. This was completed and snagging operations were commenced in July, 1891.

The entire river between West Point and Hanovertown was exam. amined, and 103 snags, 37 logs, and 103 overhanging trees were removed. Work was closed on September 26, 1891, and the plant then transferred to the Mattaponi River. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended......

$3, 016. 36 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

2,963. 02 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

53. 31 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

3, 053. 34 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project .... 7,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix J 12.)

EXAMINATIONS AND SURVEYS, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS

OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890. The required preliminary examinations of the following localities were made by the local engineer in charge, Lieut. Col. Hains, and reports thereon submitted. It is his opinion, based upon the facts and reasons given, that these localities are worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Lieut. Col. Hains was charged with and has completed their survey and submitted reports thereon. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as executive documents, Fifty-second Congress, first session.

1. Eastern Branch of the Potomac River (Anacostia River), including

that portion in District of Columbia.-The improvement recommended contemplates dredging a channel 24 feet deep and 200 feet wide from the mouth up to the Navy-Yard Bridge, with a basin in front of the navy. yard 400 feet wide and 24 feet deep; this channel to be widened, at a reduced depth, to 1,000 feet, as the demands of commerce may require in the future. The material dredged is to be deposited on the flats or marshes on either side of the river. For the present, it will be sufficient to dredge a channel 20 feet deep up to the navy-yard. The total cost of this work is estimated at $656,000.

Lieut. Col. Hains states: Before the project is regularly entered upon, steps should be taken to secure the title of the United States to all the land to be reclaimed. This will require the action of Congress.

Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 30. (See also Appendix J 13.)

2. Potomac River, Virginia and Maryland, up to the city of Washington, with the view of removing obstructions and deepening the channel.—The improvement recommended contemplates the formation of a channel 200 feet wide and 24 fect deep at low tide through the five obstructions to 24-foot navigation in the river up to Georgetown, at an estimated cost of about $300,000, as follows: Kettle Bottom Shoals

$1, 320 Maryland Point Shoal

30, 195 Smiths Point Shoals

33, 000 Mattawoman Shoals

93, 885 At Washington

141, 504 Total.

299, 904 Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 33. (See also Appendix J 14.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVI

SIONS OF ACT APPROVED MARCH 3, 1891.

The required examination and survey for a breakwater to form a harbor of safety and refuge in Lynnhaven Bay, near Cape Henry, at the foot of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, were made by Lieut. Col. Hains, and his report thereon submitted. The cost of a breakwater 4,500 feet long, constructed of concrete blocks laid close and bonded together, upon a riprap base, with the approximate location selected, is estimated at $1,555,538. The report was transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 27, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix J 15.)

IMPROVEMENT OF CERTAIN RIVERS AND HARBORS IN SOUTHEASTERN

VIRGINIA AND NORTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA.

Officers in charge, Capt. G. J. Fiebeger, Corps of Engineers, to November 30, 1891, and Lieut. Edward Burr, Corps of Engineers, since that date; Division Engineer, Col. Wm. P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers.

1. Harbor of Norfolk and its approaches, Virginia.—In 1877, previous to commencing the present improvement, the harbor of Norfolk was obstructed by shoals at the mouths of the Eastern and Southern branches, the shoal in the Eastern Branch being about one-third of a mile long, with a low-water depth of 15 to 16 feet, and the shoal in the Southern Branch being short and with a depth of from 22 to 23 feet. The approaches to the harbor were obstructed by shoals at Sewall Point, 3 miles long, with a low-water depth of 20 feet, and at the mouth

[ocr errors]

of the Western Branch, 1 mile long, with a depth of 19 feet. The depths on all these shoals and the width of the channels, particularly on the inner harbor where encroached upon by the Portsmouth and Berkley flats, were insufficient for the requirements of the port.

The plan of improvement adopted in 1878 was to deepen and widen the channels at the mouth of the Southern Branch and along the Portsmouth and Berkley flats in the harbor proper, and to improve the approaches to the harbor by dredging a channel 500 feet wide and 25 feet deep at ordinary low water through the shoals at Sewall Point and at the mouth of the Western Branch.

The revised project of 1885 is as follows: (1) To dredge a channel not less than 500 feet wide and 25 feet deep at ordinary low water from the deep water in Hampton Roads to Norfolk and the United States navy-yard on the Southern Branch, and also to dredge a channel in the Eastern Branch not less than 22 feet deep at ordinary low water, with a width of 700 feet at its mouth and not less than 300 feet at the Norfolk and Western Railroad Bridge; (2) to ultimately dredge the entire area bounded by lines parallel to and 75 feet from the port-warden lines to a depth not less than 25 feet from Fort Norfolk to the United States navy-yard, and not less than 22 feet from the mouth of the Eastern Branch to Campostella Bridge, and to build a bulkhead at Berkley Flats.

To the project of 1885 there was added in 1890 the dredging of an anchorage at the mouth of the Western Branch, with a depth of not less than 25 feet, at an estimated cost of $150,000, which amount was added to the original estimate.

With slight modifications all operations have been conducted in accordance with the adopted projects.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $498,716.09, from which resulted a channel not less than 350 feet wide and 25 feet deep from Hampton Roads to Norfolk Harbor, a channel of the same depth and from 125 feet to 500 feet wide in the Southern Branch to the United States navy-yard, and a channel not less than 22 feet deep and 200 feet wide in the Eastern Branch to the Norfolk and Western Railroad Bridge.

The channels thus dredged were in good condition, except the bar at the mouth of the Eastern Branch, which by 1889 had shoaled to 20 feet, and the bar at the mouth of the Southern Branch, which had shoaled to 22 feet.

Under the appropriation of September 19, 1890, a contract was made with the National Dredging Company, of Wilmington, Del., to remove about 1,260,000 cubic yards of material before May 30, 1892. Under this contract there were removed, previous to July 1, 1891, from Sewall Point Bar, 273,022 cubic yards of material. During the present fiscal year the contractors have removed the following amounts of material: Sewall Point Bar, 233,756 cubic yards; Eastern Branch, 279,114 cubic yards; anchorage and channel at Western Branch, 478,834 cubic yards. The total for the year was 991,704 cubic yards and the total for the contract, which was completed May 14, 1892, was 1,264,726 cubic yards.

The channel through Sewall Point Bar was increased in width from 350 feet to 500 feet, with a depth not less than 25 feet. The bar at the mouth of the Eastern Branch was redredged to 22 feet depth and a portion of Berkley Flats, 240 feet wide and 1,400 feet long, was dredged to 16 feet. The dredging at the Western Branch produced 32 acres of the proposed anchorage, with a depth not less than 25 feet, and made more available 17 acres requiring no dredging.

During this fiscal year there was expended $130,526.90, which was applied to payments on contract, office expenses, surveys, care of prop erty, etc.

Upon the completion of the contract examinations were made of the dredged channels, showing them all to be in good condition, except at the mouth of the Southern Branch, which has the same depth as in 1889. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$136, 315, 20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

130, 526.90 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

5, 788.30 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

45. 75 July 1, 1892, balance available

5, 742. 55 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

150,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

155, 742.55 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 307, 744.56 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix K 1.) 2. Approach to Norfolk Harbor and the United States (Norfolk) NavyYard, between Lambert Point and Fort Norfolk. -In its original condition the channel in this portion of the approach to Norfolk Harbor was obstructed by a shoal at the mouth of the Western Branch, about 1 mile long, on which there was 19 feet at ordinary low water.

The project of 1878 was to dredge through this shoal a channel 500 feet wide with a depth of not less than 25 feet at ordinary low water.

The revised project of 1886 is (1) to secure a channel not less than 500 feet wide and 25 feet deep at ordinary low water from Lambert Point to Fort Norfolk by the construction of a dike and by dredging, and (2) to ultimately widen this channel to within 75 feet of a straight line drawn from Fort Norfolk to the deep water off Lambert Point, 6,800 feet of which is the proposed port-warden line, making the channel at least 700 feet wide.

The amount expended on this improvement between July 5, 1884, and June 30, 1891, was $196,638.43, from which resulted a channel between Lambert Point and Fort Norfolk 700 feet wide and 25 feet deep at ordinary low water and a channel of the same depth and 600 feet wide from deep water off Lambert Point to the port-warden line.

During the year ending June 30, 1892, there was expended on this improvement $861.57, which was applied to surveys, office expenses, and care of property.

The project of 1886 has been completed with the exception of the dike. The survey of 1889 and examinations of April, 1890, and May, 1891, did not show any shoaling of the dredged channel. A survey made in May, 1892, shows a shoaling on the eastern side of the channel thought not to be due to natural causes. This can only be determined by later surveys, but it is thought that the dike will not be necessary for the maintenance of the channel. No further appropriations will be required for this project at present. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$861.57 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

861.57 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ....... 108,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix K 2.)

« AnteriorContinuar »