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Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... $50,200.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 1.)

2. Roanoke River, North Carolina.-When the United States commenced its improvement, in 1872, its navigation by vessels of 10 feet draft (as great as can be carried through Albemarle Sound), was embarrassed by the wreck of a gunboat 6 miles and by war obstructions at two points 9 and 13 miles above its mouth; also somewhat obstructed for that draft by snags in the channel and by leaning trees 67 miles to Indian Highland Bar; thence, 62 miles up to Weldon, its channel depth on the bars was about 5 feet during eight months annually, but reduced to 2 feet during the annual season of extreme low water, and its channel was badly obstructed by snags, logs, stumps, leaning and overhanging trees.

The original project of 1872 is to secure, at all seasons of the year, an unobstructed channel, with a least width of 50 feet, from the mouth 129 miles to Weldon, with a depth of at least 10 feet 67 miles to Indian Highland Bar, and of at least 5 feet 62 miles farther, to Weldon, by removing the war obstructions, snags, fallen and overhanging trees, sand bars, and ledges, by dredging, the construction of training dikes, and blasting, at an estimated cost of $269,000.

To June 30, 1891, $119,040.37 had been expended upon the improvement.

At that date the channel, for a width of 100 feet, from the mouth 103 miles to Looking Glass Bar, and the river to its full width thence 26 miles to Weldon, were well cleared of snags, logs, and stumps to the depth of 10 feet up 62 miles to Hamilton, of 5 feet thence 41 miles to Looking Glass Bar, and of 3 feet 26 miles farther to Weldon; but the river was badly obstructed by leaning and overhanging trees at all the bends from Jainesville 85 miles to Looking Glass Bar.

The natural depth at extreme low water to the river bottom was not less than 10 feet 67 miles to Indian Highland Bar, and 5 feet 51 miles farther to Halifax, excepting at Spring Gut Bar, 35 miles below Halifax, where it was only 24 feet, while at Looking Glass Bar, 15 miles below Halifax, the 5-foot channel was narrowed to from 30 to 70 feet in width.

At Halifax there was a bar, 2,450 feet in length, of rock and sand, with a depth of only 3.7 feet at extreme low water, and at the old railroad pier, 14 miles below Weldon, there was a sand bar 800 feet across with a depth of about 2 feet, while from the old Weldon Ferry there was a continuous ledge of rock 2,850 feet up to the old Weldon Landing, with only 1 foot of water upon it at extreme low stage; elsewhere from Halifax to Weldon the channel was 5 feet deep at extreme low water.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the full width of the river, from Edwards Ferry down 41 miles to Hamilton, has been entirely cleared of snags to the depth of 7 feet 24 miles down to Palmyra and of 9 feet the remaining 17 miles to Hamilton. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$19,983. 99 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

12, 845.57 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

7, 138. 42 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

259.07 July 1, 1892, balance available

6, 879. 35 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

50,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

56, 879.35

Amomt (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... $81, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 2.)

3. Pasquotank River, North Carolina.-When the United States be. gan its improvement in 1891 it had a good chaunel, nowhere less than 7 feet deep from its mouth at Albemarle Sound, 36 miles, to the Moccasin Track, with little or no obstruction 31 miles to Turners Cut; but its channel thence, 5 miles to the Moccasin Track, and the channel of the Moccasin Track, which has a natural depth of not less than 5 feet for 1,100 feet to the original entrance to the Dismal Swamp Canal were badly choked with snags, logs, and stumps, and obstructed by overhanging trees. And Turners Cut, an extension of the canal dug to a point on the river just below the obstructions to turn them, had shoaled by the caving of its sandy banks.

The river above the Moccasin Track was obstructed like the 5 miles next below it.

The present project, adopted in 1889, is, first, to clear the 5 miles of channel up to and in the Moccasin Track to the canal for navigation by all vessels that can pass through the canal and enable them to avoid Turners Cut, especially at periods of extreme low water; second, to thoroughly clear out the river 6 miles farther to Lebanon Bridge for navigation by flatboats, at an estimated cost of $9,000.

The amount expended under the project to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $2,340.28.

At that date the Moccasin Track and a channel 60 feet wide, thence down 2.4 miles to Richardson's Mills were thoroughly cleared, and a channel of the same width fairly cleared through the other 24 miles of obstructions to the lower end of Turners Cut, permitting the passage of all vessels which can pass through the canal.

Since April 16, 1891, work has been suspended for want of funds. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended......

$722, 30 June 30, 1892, amount exponded during fiscal year

132. 15 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

589.85 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

6.00 July 1, 1892, balance available...

583. 85 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

3,000,00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

3, 583. 85 (See Appendix L 3.)

4. Mackeys Creek, North Carolina.-When the United States began to improve it in February, 1892, its navigation was impeded by a bar at its mouth in Albemarle Soud. The depth upon the crest in a somewhat circuituous channel was 7 feet.

The project of 1889 is to dredge through the bar a straight channel about 2,100 feet long, 100 feet wide, and 9 feet deep at low water, modified in May, 1892, by increasing the width to 140 feet. The estimated cost was $15,000.

To June 30, 1891, $359.48 had been expended upon this work.

At that date the bar had been surveyed but dredging had not been commenced.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, a straight channel 9 feet deep has been dredged through the bar 140 feet wide for a length of 1,524 feet and 120 feet for the remaining 576 feet.

$14, 650.52

7, 658. 46

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..
July 1, 1892, balance unexpended
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities
July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

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July 1, 1892, balance available...

692. 31 (See Appendix L 4.)

5. Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina.-In 1828, when the United States began to improve the inlet, vessels drawing 9 feet could cross the ocean bar at low water, but the channel thence into Pamlico Sound was not practicable for vessels drawing more than 5 feet.

To 1837 the sum of $133,732.40 was expended, producing an increase of 31 feet in the depth in one of the channels to Pamlico Sound, and “a material increase in the number of vessels seeking this outlet from North Carolina ports to the sea,” but the shoaling of the dredged channel and destruction of a jetty constructed to prevent it led to the abandonment of the improvement.

In 1891, when the inlet was surveyed preparatory to resuming its improvement with the sum of 890,000 appropriated by the act of September 19, 1890, the depth in the channel on the bar was not less than 14 feet at mean low water and 4 to 6 feet in the channels thence to Pamlico Sound.

The project of 1889 is to dredge a channel 300 feet wide and about 6,000 feet across the inner bar, at an estimated cost, if 10 feet deep, of $100,000; if 13 feet deep, of $190,000, and if 15 feet deep, of $280,000, with the possible construction of necessary protecting dikes, at an additional cost of $320,000, aggregating 8600,000.

To June 30, 1891, $1,747.71 had been expended.

At that date the inlet had been surveyed, but the improvement had not been commenced.

To June 30, 1892, no work has been done.
July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

#88, 274. 29 June 30, 1892, amount expended «uring fiscal year.

404.57 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

87, 869. 72 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$5,56 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 75,000.00

75, 095.56 July 1, 1892, balance available

12, 774. 16 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

15,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

27,774.16 (See Appendix L 5.)

6. Fishing Creek, North Carolina.-When the first appropriation was made by Congress, September 19, 1890, for its improvement, its depth was about 4 feet at ordinary stages 38 miles to Bellamys Mills and its width 40 to 100, and occasionally 120 feet.

The project of 1889 is to clear it of snags, logs, and overhanging trees to Bellamys Mills.

To June 30, 1891, no money had been applied to the improvement, and no money has been applied to it during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, because the bridges over the creek have not been provided with draws as required by the law before any part of the money appropriated can be applied to the improvement.

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July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$10,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

10,000.00 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893....

15,000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 10,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 6.)

7. Pamlico and Tar River, North Carolina.-(One river, called the Pamlico below and the Tar above Washington.) When the United States began to improve it in 1877 its channel was obstructed in two places below Washington by piles; just below Sparta by scuttled lighters; 1 mile below Tarboro by the wreck of a steamer; immediately below Washington by a bar with a depth of 5 feet at low water on its crest in the channel; between Washington and Tarboro the available depth was 2 to 3 feet not more than eight months annually, and above Washingtion the entire river was more or less obstructed by snags, logs, and stumps in its channel and by trees overhanging from its banks.

The project of 1875 is to secure by dredging and removal of war obstructions a clear and safe channel 9 feet deep at low water up to Washington, and of 1879 to clear a channel 60 feet wide, 3 feet deep at low water, 22 miles to Greenville, and 20 inches deep at low water 66 miles farther to Rocky Mount, at a total final estimated cost-of $92,200.

To June 30, 1891, $68,793.13 had been expended upon this work.

At that date there was a channel up to Washington, crooked and difficult to run, with a minimum depth of about 7 feet, from which some stumps needed to be removed, and two troublesome shoals between Washington and Tarboro, with a depth upon one of only about 1 foot at low water. The river between Washington and Tarboro was at intervals considerably obstructed, and from Tarboro to Rocky Mount much obstructed by snags, logs, stumps, and overhanging trees.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the channel has been cleared of snags, logs, and stumps, and the banks of leaning and overhanging trees from the falls at Rocky Mount down 64 miles to within 2 miles of Greenville. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$9, 256. 21 June 30 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

6,148. 39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

3, 107. 82 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

832. 67 July 1, 1892, balance available.

2,275. 15 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 .

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .

12, 275, 15 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 42,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 7.)

8. Contentnia Creek, North Carolina.—When the United States began to improve it in 1881' it was badly choked with fallen timber, snags, logs, and stumps; also obstructed by sand bars, and navigation ren dered exceedingly difficult, in many places next to impossible, by the dense overhanging growth.

The project of 1881 is to clear it 63 miles to Stantonsburg of overhanging trees and its channel of snags and logs to a depth of not less than 3 feet at the flush-water stages of eight or nine months' annual duration, at an estimated cost of $77,500.

To June 30, 1891, $48,701.50 had been expended upon this work.

At that date the channel to the depth of 3 feet had been moderately cleared 31 miles up to Snow Hill, and roughly cleared 32 miles farther to Stantonsburg.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, no work has been done, awaiting a period of specially low water for clearing Spring Slough, near the mouth of the creek, of snags and stumps. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$3,588.90 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1, 341. 25 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

2, 247.65 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

37. 10 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

2, 210.55 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

7,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

9, 210.55 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 18,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 8.)

9. Trent River, North Carolina.-When the United States began to improve it in 1879 the river was comparatively free from obstructions from Newbern, 21 miles, to Pollocksville, between which points a draft of 6 feet could be carried at low water; above Pollocksville it was obstructed by bars of sand and rock, and especially by great numbers of snags in the 14 miles from Quaker Bridge up to Trenton. One steamer ran regularly to Pollocksville and one occasionally 9 miles farther to Quaker Bridge, above which point navigation was confined to flat boats and rafts.

The project of 1879 was to secure a channel 3 feet deep at low summer stage from Pollocksville to Trenton by removing all obstructions and dredging a cut 50 feet wide through the shoals, at a cost, estimated in 1887, at $59,000.

In 1889 the project was extended to remove obstructions to permit navigation by small steamboats 33 miles above Trenton and by pole boats 64 miles farther, to Upper Quaker Bridge, at an additional cost of $13,000, the two projects aggregating $72,000.

To June 30, 1891, $53,897.07 had been expended upon this work.

At that date the channel had been cleared of snags, etc., and the banks of overhanging trees from the mouth to Trenton, and fairly cleared 7 miles above that point; a channel 3 feet deep at low water and 50 to 75 feet wide had been dredged through the shoals between Pollocksyille and Trenton; a turning basin had been dredged and revetted at Trenton, and a channel dredged to the depth of 8 feet and width of 100 feet through Foys Shoal, 6 miles above Newbern. But steamers which the improvement had enabled to make regular trips to Trenton had again been prevented from ascending to it by shoals which had reformed in the 2 or 3 miles immediately below that place.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the river has been carefully surveyed from Trenton, 39} miles, to Upper Quaker Bridge, but the funds available have been insufficient for other work,

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