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navigation was not obstructed, but thence 34 miles to Lisbon was badly obstructed by snags, logs, stumps, and overhanging trees.

Excepting the appropriation by act of July 13, 1892, the $3,000 appropriated August 5, 1886, is the only appropriation made for this improvement, and no work has been done upon the river since September, 1889. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$5.93 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5.93 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

10,000.00 (See Appendix L 17:) 18. Cape Fear River, North Carolina, above Wilmington.- When the United States began to improve it in 1882 the depth of water was always ample and navigation unimpeded by shoals from Wilmington 49 miles up to Hungry Neck; thence 66 miles to Fayetteville there were many shoals on which the water was not more than 12 to 14 inches deep during the low stage; from Indian Wells Landing, 37 miles above Wilmington, 78 miles to Fayetteville the river was badly obstructed by snags, logs, and overhanging trees.

The project of 1881, as matured in 1885 and 1886, is to secure at all times of the year a depth of 4 feet from Wilmington 73 miles to Elizabethtown, and of 3 feet thence 42 miles to Fayetteville, by removing snags and rock from the bed and overhanging trees from the banks, by contracting the channel by jetties on the shoals, and by a little dredging at a bar of clay, at an estimated cost of $472,700.

To June 30, 1891, $94,350.43 had been expended upon this work.

At that date a channel 100 feet wide was fairly cleared from Wilmington 73 miles to Elizabethtown, and 80 feet wide 42 miles farther to Fayetteville. The least channel depth during the entire year was 4 feet from Wilmington 46 miles to Kellys Cove, 3 feet thence 27 miles to Elizabethtown, and 2 feet 42 miles farther to Fayetteville.

With the amount, $5,520.93, applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the worst snags were taken from the channel in the 22 miles next below and 26 miles next above Elizabethtown; 793 linear feet of brush and stone jetties were built in the 123 miles next below Fayetteville; the shoal at Elizabethtown was surveyed and the construction of jetties upon it commenced. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended......

$10, 070.92 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5,520.93 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

4,549.99 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

530. 30 July 1, 1892, balance available

4, 019. 69 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

15, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

19, 019. 69 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 158, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river aud

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 18.)

19. Cape Fear River, North Carolina, at and below Wilmington.— The United States began to improve the river between the bar and Wilmington in 1829 and the channel on the bar in 1853. In 1829 the river was so obstructed that vessels drawing more than 10 feet were obliged

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to anchor 14 miles below Wilmington and discharge a part of their cargoes into lighters. In 1853, at low water on the bar, the least midchannel depth was 7 feet in the western channel, 71 feet in the eastern channel, and 8 feet at New Inlet, 7 miles above the mouth.

The original project of 1827 was to deepen the channel through the shoals in the 8 miles next below Wilmington by contracting it by jetties and by diverting into it water from Brunswick River and from Fishing and Rodmans creek.

The project of 1853 was to straighten and deepen the channel on the bar by building jetties and a wing dam, by dredging, by diverting water through it from New Inlet, by building a jetty at Federal Point, and by closing two small breaches in Zekes Island.

The project of 1870 was to deepen the bar channel by closing the breaches between Smiths and Zekes islands, with the ultimate closure of New Inlet in view.

The project of 1873, to deepen the channel through the bar, added to that of 1870, to dredge in the Baldhead (eastern) Channel, to extend across Zekes Island and beyond it into the river, the dam then being built to close the breaches between Smiths and Zekes islands, and to close New Inlet, commencing with the building of a jetty from Federal Point.

The project of 1874 was “to get 12 feet at low water as high as the city of Wilmington” by dredging a channel 100 feet wide through Horseshoe Shoal below New Inlet and through three other shoals near Wilmington.

The project of 1881 was to dredge a channel 23 miles in length through Horseshoe Shoal, and through eight other shoals above it, 270 feet wide and 16 feet deep at mean low water from deep water at Smithville (Southport) to Wilmington.

The project of 1891 was to secure a channel 20 feet deep from Wilmington to the bar, by dredging a cut 270 feet wide and 20 feet deep at mean low water an aggregate length of 17.2 miles through ten shoals, and to increase the depth in the channel on the bar to 20 feet at mean low water, and secure it by the possible construction of stone jetties at an estimated aggregate cost of $1,800,000.

The present project, of June 9, 1892, is to obtain with the United States suction dredge Woodbury as great a depth as practicable, not to exceed 18 feet at mean low water, in the channel on the bar, and to dredge a channel 18 feet deep at mean low water through the shoals, thence to Wilmington, and as wide as the funds available in the next two year will permit, it being left to the experience of the next few years to decide whether it be necessary or expedient to work for a greater depth.

To June 30, 1891, $2,519,035,46 had been expended upon this work.

At that date New Inlet had been closed and a continuous stone dam 3.3 miles in length had been completed, extending across the inlet, Zekes Island, and the breaches between Zekes and Smiths islands; crossing the bar, there was a tortuous channel having a minimum depth of 17 feet at mean low water; thence there was a channel 16 feet deep at mean low water and 233 to 270 feet wide through all the shoals to Wilmington; at the shoal at Wilmington a cut 2,100 feet in length had been dredged to the width of 270 feet and depth of 20 feet at mean low water.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, a channel has been completed 20 feet deep at mean low water, 270 feet wide and 3,200 in length, through Wilmington Shoal; to the same depth,

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148 feet wide and 9,800 feet long, through Alligator Creek Shoal, and 37 to 74 feet wide and 7,700 feet long through Brunswick River Shoal; and a channel 40 to 80 feet wide and 18 feet deep at mean low water has been dredged, where shoaling bad occurred, 1,649 feet long at New Snows Marsh Channel. The United States suction dredge Woodbury has also dredged 87,915 cubic yards of material from the channel on the bar and redredged 62,730 cubic yards from New Snows Marsh Channel.

June 30, 1892, the channel across the bar is somewhat straighter than one year ago and has a minimum depth of 17 feet at mean low water; thence to Wilmington the channel is 16 feet deep at mean low water through all the shoals excepting Lilliput Shoal, where for a distance of 300 feet the minimum depth is 15 feet. The 16-foot channel is 270 feet wide, excepting at Snows Marsh, where it is diminished by shoaling to a width of about 40 feet. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$128, 112.-62 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

91, 762. 39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

36, 350. 23 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$19,950.52 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 764. 64

20, 715. 16 July 1, 1892, balance available

15, 635.07 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

200,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

215, 635.07 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....

101, 392.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 19.)

20. Lockwoods Folly River, North Carolina.-When the United States began this improvement, in 1892, the depth at low water was 51 feet in the shifting channel on its ocean bar, within which the depth was 5 to 12 feet for 14 miles to an expanse of mud flats and beds of oyster rock, over which for 14 miles the river flowed with a width of one-fourth to three-fourths of a mile, and a depth of less than 1 foot at mean low water. A little above these flats was a shoal 300 feet long, upon which at mean low water the depth was 34 feet; thence to Lockwoods Folly Bridge, 25 miles above the mouth, it was nowhere less than 5 feet and the width 70 to 200 feet.

The project of 1887 is to dredge a channel 100 feet wide and 7 feet deep at low water through the mud flats and beds of oyster rock and the shoal above, at a cost estimated in 1892 at $60,000.

To June 30, 1891, $19.81 had been expended.

At that date the bar had been surveyed, but dredging had not been commenced.

With the amount, $4,944.51, applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, a cut 40 feet wide and 5 feet deep at mean low water was dredged 2,530 feet in length, about one-third of the distance through the mud flats and beds of oyster rock. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1,980, 19 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

4,944.51 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

35. 68 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

3, 035.68

Amount (estimated in 1887) required for completion of existing project. $32,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 20.)

21. Yadkin River, North Carolina.-Its improvement is restricted to a section 33 miles in length, below and between which and its lower part, called the Great Pedee, which is navigable from tide water to near the southern boundary of the State, there intervenes a section of the river 111 miles in length containing many shoals, rapids, and falls which entirely preclude any attempt to make it navigable.

When the United States commenced to improve the section 641 miles long from the railroad bridge near Salisbury to the foot of Bean Shoal, its navigation was completely obstructed by rock ledges, fishing and milldams, and numerous shoals, with a greatest depth of 1 foot at ordinary low water on some of its shoals and ledges. The estimated cost of the improvement was $400,000.

The project of 1879 was to secure a minimum depth of 21 feet at ordinary stages nine months annually throughout the 644 miles.

The present project, of 1887, is to secure this depth for a distance of 334 miles only, next above the railroad bridge at Salisbury, at an estimated cost of $107,000.

To June 30, 1891, $98,971.45 had been expended upon this work. At that date it had a channel 40 to 70 feet wide, 24 feet deep, about eight months annually, navigated only by flat and pole boats.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, 392 linear feet of dams has been built and 216 cubic yards of stone raised from the channel. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$3, 460. 20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

3, 004. 38 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

455, 82 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

57. 25 July 1, 1892, balance available

398. 57 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5,398.57 (See Appendix L 21.) 22. Harbor at Georgetown, South Carolina.—This harbor is that part of the Sampit River immediately within the bar at its mouth head of Winyaw Bay.

When the United States began to improve it in 1884, there was in the channel on the ocean bar at the mouth of the bay at low water, about 8f feet and about 12 feet at high water, thence up the bay there was a depth of 13 feet to the bar at the mouth of the Sampit, upon which there was only 9 feet at ordinary low water.

The project of 1881 is to dredge a channel 200 feet wide to the depth of 12 feet at ordinary low water through this shoal or bar to permit . vessels to reach the wharves at Georgetown.

To June 30, 1891, $23,935.73 had been expended upon this work.

At that date a channel 12 feet deep had been dredged entirely through the shoal with a minimum width of 80 feet, and for a part of its length of 100 feet.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the minimum width of the 12-foot channel has been increased to 130 feet.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$8,564,27 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year .

8, 189.39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

374.88 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

16.00 July 1, 1892, balance available...

358.88 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

12,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30,1893....

12, 358. 88 (See Appendix L 22.)

23. Winyaw Bay, South Carolina.-When the United States began to improve it in 1890, there was at mean low water in the main (southerly) channel on its ocean bar, 7 to 9 feet, and in the Bottle (easterly) Channel 6 to 8 feet of water, both channels being changeable; thence 12 miles to the head of the bay vessels could draw 12 feet at lowest tides.

Tbe project of 1885, as approved by the Board of Engineer officers in 1888, and by the Chief of Engineers in 1889, is to increase the depth of water in Bottle Channel to about 15 feet at mean low water by building to the height of 6 feet above that plane a jetty from North Island 10,700 feet long, and a jetty from South Island 17,500 feet long across the main channel to the 15-foot curve, at a total estimated cost of $2,500,000.

To prevent the overflow to the depth of about 1 foot at mean high water of a wide expanse of marsh on the southerly side of the entrance to the bay, ensuing from the degradation of about 3 miles of beach, and hurtful changes of the tidal regimen of the bay, a dike 12,000 feet in length is to be built, at an estimated cost of $35,280, by authority from the Chief of Engineers of May 10, 1892.

To June 30, 1891, $32,836.88 had been expended upon this work.

At that date the necessary plant had been installed, and the north jetty and its two branches built to the mean water line.

With the amount applied during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the north jetty has been built to a distance of 2,090 feet from the mean water line to a height of about 18 inches above mean low water, but mot far enough to have any perceptible effect upon the channel on the bar; and 871 tons of stone have been placed on the jetty and its branches on shore. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$191, 758.81 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

125, 633. 42 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

66, 125. 39 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$34, 351.18 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 16, 242. 20

50, 593. 38 July 1, 1892, balance available

15, 532. 01 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

100,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .....

115, 532. 01 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 2, 181, 250.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix L 23.)

24. Removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation.—The wreck of an old schooner opposite Swan Point in Pamlico

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