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and appliances in it is well under way. This building will furnish all the storage room needed for many years to come.

The small tug for planting torpedoes has been placed under contract and is to be completed by the end of September.

A quantity of lumber and other materials have been procured for the purpose of replacing the old and worn-out pontoon bridge equipage.

The buildings and machinery for trials of the Sims-Edison Torpedo have been provided and are now in use for the purpose intended.

A concrete tank for insulated torpedo cable has been built and is now in use for storing cable.

The depot property, such as torpedo, pontoon materials, and instruments, have been cared for, and the usual purchases, receipts, issues, and repairs have been made.

Experiments have been continued, including the trials of the SimsEdison Torpedo, tests of building materials, fuses, circuit closers, mooring rope, shackles, etc., details of which will be found in appendixes, or have been made the subject of special reports.

STATEMENT OF FUNDS.

Congress has at various times appropriated as follows: 1. For engineer depot at Willets Point, N. Y., for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the amount of..

$11,000.00 Expended and pledged...

10,996. 75 For engineer depot at Willets Point, N. Y., (no limit) for fireproof storehouse, the amount of

16, 000.00 Expended and pleelged..

12, 468.34 Outstanding liabilities,

558. 15 July 1, 1892, balance available.

2, 973.51 2. Torpedoes for harbor defense, act September 22, 1888: July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

17, 316. 75 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended and available

5, 088.33 3. Torpedoes for harbor defense, act March 2, 1889: July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

121, 713. 93 June 30, 1892, assigned during fiscal year.

5,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended and available.

21, 315.51 4. Torpedoes for harbor defense, act August 18, 1890: July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

46, 748. 54 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended and available.

24, 598. 85 5. Torpedoes for harbor defense, act February 24, 1891: July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

16, 7-12.08 July 1, 1892, balance mexpended and availalle ....

83. 70 6. Torpedoes for harbor defense, acts March 2, 1889, and August 18, 1890:

Reallotted during fiscal year for purchase of American Submarine
Cable, total amount....

74, 961. 12 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended and available.

74,961. 12 7. For engineer depot at Willets Point, N. Y., for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1893....

15, 000.00 There will be required for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894, for the engineer depot at Willets Point, N. Y., viz: 1. For incidental expenses of depot.

$5,000.00 2. For purchase of materials for instruction of battalion..

3,500.00 3. For purchase and repair of instruments...

3,000.00 4. For purchase and binding of professional works for library

500.00 Total ....

12,000.00 (See Appendix No. 5.)

RIVER AND HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS.

The funds with which the works for the improvement of rivers and harbors were prosecuted during the last fiscal year were derived from the appropriations by the river and harbor act approved September 19, 1890, appropriations in the sundry civil act approved March 3, 1891, for certain works on account of which contracts were to be made for completion as provided in the act of September 19, 1890, and such balances of former appropriations as were available.

A brief statement derived from the reports of the officers in charge of the several works hereinafter given sets forth the condition of each improvement, the extent of work performed during the last fiscal year, the amount expended, and estimate of amount required for its completion.

Section 2 of the river and harbor act approved March 2, 1867, requires that the Secretary of War shall annually submit to Congress a full estimate for the entire and permanent completion of each river and harbor work, and of the amount that can be profitably expended on each uncompleted work in the next fiscal year.

It is believed that sufficient funds are provided by the river and harbor act approved July 13, 1892, to carry the works through the fiscal year of 1894, except in the cases of works on account of which contracts are to be made for their completion as provided in the river and barbor acts of 1890 and 1892, and consequently estimates for this last class of works only are submitted. Each report, however, sets forth the amount necessary to complete the work in question, and provides a basis upon which items of appropriation can, if necessary, be formulated.

Reports are appended of the work accomplished in the removal of wrecks obstructing or endangering navigation, as provided for in section 4 of the river and harbor act approved June 14, 1880, and enlarged by provision in the river and harbor act of August 2, 1882.

Under the authority given to the Secretary of War in section 12 of the river and harbor act approved September 19, 1890, harbor lines have been established at the following localities:

Five Mile River Harbor, Connecticut; New York Harbor and adjacent waters; Anacostia River (Eastern Branch of the Potomac, Washington, D. C.); South Branch of Elizabeth River, at navy-yard, Norfolk, Virginia; San Pedro, Wilmington Harbor, California; San Diego Harbor and adjacent waters, California; Willamette River at Portland, Oregon; Vancouver Harbor (Columbia River), Olympia Harbor, and Bellingham Bay (at New Whatcom and Fair Haven, Washington).

Examinations were made whenever required by the committees of Congress of proposed bills authorizing the construction of bridges upon which the views of the War Department were desired.' Of the bills so examined 34 originated in the Senate, and 56 in the House of Representatives.

During the fiscal year examinations were made of such plans and locations as were submitted by parties interested, of bridges proposed to be built over navigable waters subject to the approval of the Secretary of War, as authorized by acts of Congress. A brief statement is given of the action had in such cases.

Under sections 4 and 5 of the river and harbor act approved September 19, 1890, persons, corporations, or associations owning or controlling bridges over navigable water ways of the United States, which are unreasonable obstructions to the free navigation of such waters, after being given a reasonable opportunity to be heard, have been notified to so alter the bridges as to render navigation through or under them

reasonably free, easy, and unobstructed. In each case the changes required to be made were specified in the notice, and reasonable time was prescribed in which to make them. A detailed statement of the cases is given further on in this report.

Reports made in compliance with the requirements of section 2 of the river and harbor act of July 5, 1884, and section 4 of that of August 5, 1886, of instances in which piers, breakwaters, or other works built by the United States in aid of commerce or navigation are used, occupied or injured by a corporation or an individual, will be found in Appendix Zz.

The engineering works in the charge of this office are arranged in five divisions, and officers of the corps assigned as division engineers to overlook the work, as follows:

West of the Rocky Mountains: Pacific Division, Col. George H. Mendell. East of the Rocky Mountains: Northeast Division, Col. Henry L. Abbot; Southeast Division, Col. Wm. P. Craighill; Southwest Division, Col. Cyrus B. Comstock; Northwest Division, Col. Orlando M. Poe.

South Pass of the Mississippi River.-During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the legal channel was maintained at the head of South Pass and through the Pass itself, but during a period of thirty-two days, from May 20 to June 20, both dates inclusive, such channel did not obtain through the jetties at the mouth of the Pass. During this period, however, there was a navigable depth of 28.1 feet.

Rules and regulations for the use of canals.-Section 7 of the river and harbor act approved July 5, 1884, authorized the Secretary of War to prescribe proper rules and regulations for the administration, and use by the public, of the Des Moines Rapids Canal, the St. Marys Falls Canal, and the Louisville and Portland Canal, and provided penalties for willful violations of such rules. Similar legislation was subsequently enacted by acts of August 11, 1888, and September 19, 1890, applying to the South Pass of the Mississippi River and the Des Moines Rapids Dry Dock.

It is desirable that similar authority should be granted to the Secretary of War with respect to all the canals owned and operated by the Government, and that the willful violation of such rules as may be prescribed should be declared a misdemeanor, and penalties therefor be provided. The need of rules to govern the use and navigation of these works, and of adequate provision for their enforcement, applies alike to all the canals. Express legislation in some cases indicates that Congressional action is necessary in all cases for the sufficient and proper enforcement of whatever rules the Secretary of War may promulgate, and difficulty has already arisen from the lack of authority to enforce rules and regulations prescribed for the use of canals not embraced in existing enactments.

The following draft of an act, which will, it is believed, accomplish the objects desired with respect to all United States canals and similar works of navigation, is proposed and recommended for passage by Congress: AN ACT providing for the establishment and enforcement of rules and regulations for the use and

navigation of United States canals and similar works of navigation, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War be, and is hereby, authorized to prescribe and publish such rules and regulations for the government, use, and navigation of any or all canals and similar works of navigation that now are or hereafter may be owned, operated, or maintained by the United States as may seem necessary, proper, or expedient for the purpose of regulating the use of such canals or similar works by vessels passing throngh them, ind of preventing any obstruc

tion to the channels through such canals or similar works and auy injury to the bed and banks thereof, aud to the works constructed for the improvement or in connection with them,

SEC. 2. That any willful violation of any rule or regulation made by the Secretary of War in pursuance of this act shall be deemed a misdemeanor, for which the owner or owners, agent or agents, master or pilot of the vessel offendivg shall be separately and collectively responsible, and on conviction thereof, in any district court in the United States within whose territorial jurisdiction such offense may have been committed, shall be liable to punishment by a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars or by imprisonment not exceeding six months, at the discretion of the court, for each offense.

Sec. 3. That it shall be the duty of all persons using or navigating such canals or similar works, their channels and approaches, or using any of the piers, breakwaters, docks, wharves, or other improvements belonging to the United States, to observe the regulations prescribed by the Secretary of War as aforesaid; and any person who shall willfully or negligently strand or sink any steam vessel, boat, or craft in such canals or similar works, or in the channels or approaches, or who shall willfully or negligently, or by failure or neglect to observe the regulations prescribed by the Secretary of War for the use thereof, obstruct or impair such canals or similar works, or cause any impediment, injury, filling up, or shoaling therein, or in the approaches thereto, tending to obstruct or impair the navigation thereof, or who shall willfully damage or injure the piers, breakwaters, wharves, docks, or other improvements of such canals or similar works belonging to the United States, or who shall fail to obey or observe any of said prescribed regulations, shall be liable to the penalty prescribed by section two of this act, and shall, in addition thereto, be liable to the United States, or to any person aggrieved by such obstructions, or injuries, or unlawful acts, or omissions, in a civil action for all damages occasioned thereby, or by any of said unlawful acts, to said United States or such aggrieved person.

ATLANTIC COAST AND GULF OF MEXICO.

IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS AND HARBORS IN MAINE AND NEW HAMP

SHIRE.

Officers in charge, Lieut. Col. Jared A. Smith, Corps of Engineers, to December 3, 1891, and Lieut. Col. Peter C. Hains, Corps of Engineers, since that date.

1. St. Croix River, Maine.-An examination and survey of the St. Croix River were made under the provisions of the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, and the reports on same were published in the An. nual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1890 (page 463). The available depth, at mean low water, over the shoals, was found to be from 6.5 to 9.5 feet, and in the upper part of the harbor at Calais but 1.5 feet. The channel was also narrow. In the report on the survey it was proposed to obtain a channel 12 feet deep at mean low water, with a general width of 200 feet, but narrowed to 150 and 100 feet at the upper end. Such an improvement would enable steamboats to reach landings at the upper end of the harbor, and would allow large lumber vessels to fully load at the wharves instead of having to drop down stream about 4 miles to complete their cargoes.

An appropriation of $35,000 was made by act approved September 19, 1890, coupled with the proviso “that the Government of the Dominion of Canada shall expend a like sum in the improvement of said river."

No work has yet been done, pending action by the Dominion Government, and none of the appropriation has been expended. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$35,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

35, 000,00 Amonnt (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 245, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 1.)

2. Lubec Channel, Maine.—This channel lies between the eastern extremity of the State of Maine and Campobello Island, Dominion of Canada.

Originally the channel was but 5 feet in depth at mean low water, and but 2 feet at low water of spring tides.

The project, adopted in 1879, and subsequently modified, was for a channel 275 feet wide, 300 feet wide in the bends, and 12 feet deep at mean low water.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, amounted to $168,929.42.
The expenditures during the past year were $25.

At the close of the fiscal year 1891 the project had been practically completed, and no work has been done since.

Under the provisions of the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, an examination of Lubec Channel was made, and the report was published in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1891 (page 616). July 1, 1891, ba nce unexpended

$70.58 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

25.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

45.58 (See Appendix A 2.)

3. Moosabec Bar, Maine.—Before the improvement was commenced the entrance at the eastern end of Moosabec Reach was difficult, the channel being crooked, with ledges on either hand. The direct entrance was obstructed by a bar on which the depth was only about 6 feet at mean low water.

The project, adopted in 1881, provided for a channel 14 feet deep at mean low water, and not less than 200 feet wide, through the bar at the eastern entrance to the reach. In 1888 the project was extended to provide for widening the 14-foot channel to 300 feet, for removal of ledges obstructing the channel, and for the construction of a small breakwater to divert cross currents.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $53,888.29. At the latter date the 300-foot channel had been completed to the full projected width and depth, the construction of the breakwater had been commenced, and a small quantity of ledge had been removed.

The expenditures during the past year amount to $6,530.48, which was applied to the completion of the small breakwater included in the project. The work remaining to be done consists of the removal of ledges obstructing the channel at its west end.

The benefits derived from the improvement are not local, the thoroughfare being extensively used by coastwise vessels, both as a harbor of refuge and as a sheltered route. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$16, 111. 71 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

6, 530. 48 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

9, 581.23 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

15, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

24, 581.23 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...

65,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 3.)

4. Pleasant River, Maine.-Originally the channel above Addison Point was obstructed by bowlders, while below navigation was rendered

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