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No money being available for this improvement during the last fiscal year no work has been done since June 30, 1891. Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

$2,000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 1,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix W 6.)

7. Little Red River, Arkansas.—The only improvements ever attempted upon this river were made in 1872. Prior to this work many overhanging trees and a large number of snags interfered with navigation in the lower reaches, and many bowlders obstructed flatboat and raft navigation in the reach above the present town of Judsonia. Most of the overhanging trees and snags were removed as high as Judsonia, and the bowlders remained untouched to the end of June 30, 1886.

By acts of August 5, 1886, and August 11, 1888, $8,400 was appropriated for removing the bowlders above Judsonia and dredging a channel through the shoals 3 miles below. After the work on the shoals had been nearly completed the dredge was sold, making $3,500 additional money available. Up to June 30, 1891, $9,294.25 had been expended removing the bowlders, building a dredge and barges, partial excavation of channel, cutting overhanging timber, removing a few logs and snags between Judsonia and Heber, Ark., and caring for the property. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $1,896.82 was expended on a special project, making the work between Judsonia and Heber more effective, after the work at Bess Shoals had been completed. The present appropriation will complete the project. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1,896.94 Received as per letter Chief of Engineers April 11, 1892.

300.00

2, 196.94 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

1, 896. 82 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

300.12 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

133.00 July 1, 1892, balance available....

167. 12 (See Appendix W 7.)

8. Black River, Arkansas and Missouri.—Before any improvements were made upon this river navigation was practically closed by snags, logs, and overhanging trees, the snags and logs in many places forming shoals, and in other places rock and gravel shoals interfered with navigation. The original plan for improvement contemplated the removal of the obstructions and the improvement of the shoals by wing dams. A few of the sloughs were to be closed up, so as to confine the water to the main channel. Up to June 30, 1891, $62,779,68 had been expended for this purpose, doing thorough work up to a few miles above the mouth of Current River and from Poplar Bluft, Mo., to Corning, Ark., and just taking up the worst obstructions to get the snag boat through the balance of the distance. Much work was left undone between Poplar Bluff, Mo., and the Arkansas State line.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $3,181.76 was expended in operations from Corning, Ark., to the mouth of Current River, thence back to the Arkansas and Missouri State line, removing a large number of obstructions and opening the river through for the first time, so that at high and medium stages boats may reach Poplar Bluff, Mo., with reasonable facility.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

$3, 462.72 3, 181. 76

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

280. 96 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 280.96 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project annually; 8,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix W 8.)

9. Black River, Missouri.-The first improvements attempted upon this reach of river were made in the years of 1881 and 1882. Prior to this work its channel was choked with snags and logs, and obstructed by overhanging trees, and in many places shoals interfered with its navigation at low water by any but very light-draft boats. The original plan for improvement contemplated the removal of the obstructions and the improvement of the shoals, the latter by wing dams. A few sloughs were to be closed up so as to confine the water to the main channel. Up to June 30, 1891, $16,914.21 had been expended in removing overhanging trees, trees that had fallen across the channel, dangerous snags and piles of drift, all of these items in formidable numbers, giving great relief to navigation, inadequate, however, to meet all its requirements.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $2,990.20 was expended, furthering the same work to a limited degree, however, due to the boat's being required upon the appropriation, “improving Black River, Arkansas and Missouri,” until nearly the close of the low-water season, so that less than two months' work was done before high water. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$3, 085. 79 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

2, 990. 20 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

95.59 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

75.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

20. 59 (See Appendix W 9.)

10. St. Francis River, Arkansas.-Appropriations have been made for this river in connection with those for the White River. The first appropriation was made March 2, 1833, prior to which this river was choked with drift, logs, snags, and its waters spread out through a great variety of sloughs, while overhanging trees added to the difficulty of navigation. The originally adopted project was principally for snagging operations, and attempts have been made to close up some of the many sloughs. On July 5, 1884, the first separate appropriation was made. From that time to June 30, 1891, $26,499.10 had been expended in carrying out the approved project.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, 91,457.76 was expended in continuance of the work, in the execution of some badly needed work between Madison, Ark., and a point 25 miles below, exhausting the appropriation. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1,500.90 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1, 457.76 July 1, 1892, balance inexpended

43. 14 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

8,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

8,013. 14

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project annually $8,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix W 10.)

11. St. Francis River, Missouri.—The first appropriation made for this reach of river was that of act of August 11, 1888, in amount $5,000. Prior to the work done with this sum, logs, snags, overhang. ing trees, and several shoals interfered with low-water navigation. The estimate, $7,300, proposed the removal of the shoals about 12 miles below Greenville and the removal of snags and other obstructions. The amount appropriated by act of Angust 11, 1888, was inadequate. Up to June 30, 1891, $7,642.68 had been expended in cutting a channel through the Big Drift and carrying out other provisions of the original project, combined with those of the project under the act approved September 19, 1890, which, added to the original project, provides for a hand-propelled snag boat for use between the Sunk Lands and Greenville, Mo., said snag boat being built in this period.

uring the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $4,687.09 was expended in operations in accord with the combined projects, the removing of a for midable array of obstructions from St. Francis, Ark., to the Big Drift, a distance of about 70 miles. Work was suspended by high water and cold weather. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$7,857.32 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

4,687.09 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.,

3, 170. 23 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

193. 35 July 1, 1892, balance available....

2,976. 88 (See Appendix W 11.)

12. Little River, Missouri.–Before improvement this river was obstructed by snags, logs, masses of driftwood, and shoals, and was divided into two chutes. The project for improvement contemplates prolonging medium-stage navigation by closing one of the chutes and removing the obstructions enumerated from the other.

The first appropriation ever made for this river was $5,000, act of Angust 11, 1888; $3,000 additional followed in the act of September 19, 1890. Up to June 30, 1891, $4,968.10 had been expended, carrying the work to within 20 miles of the lake, and building a dam 300 feet long across the right chute.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $3,011.38 was expended, removing snags, overhanging trees and drift piles over the portion not worked last season. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$3,031.90 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

3,011,38 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

20.52 (See Appendix W 12.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS

OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890.

The required preliminary examination at Clarendon and the lower White River, Arkansas, to determine the effect of backwater from the Mississippi River and its cause and the means and cost of preventing injury therefrom, was made by the local engineer in charge, Capt.

Taber, and report thereon submitted through Col. C. B. Comstock, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Southwest Division. It is the opinion of Capt. Taber, and of the division engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Capt. Taber was charged with and completed its survey and submitted report thereon, through the division engineer. Col. Comstock stated that the construction of levees along the Mississippi River below Helena, Ark., will prevent, as far as is practicable, injurious effects of the Mississippi River backwater on the White River. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No.118, Fifty-second Congress, first session.

Further information in regard to this matter being called for by resolution of the House of Representatives of March 4, 1892, a supplemental report by Col. Comstock, presenting an approximate estimate of $1,100,000 as cost of constructing sufficient levees along the Mississippi River from Helena to the White River, was, with the reports of the examination and survey, transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 163, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix W 13.)

REMOVING SNAGS AND WRECKS FROM MISSISSIPPI RIVER; IMPROVE

MENT OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN OHIO AND ILLINOIS RIVERS, OF HARBOR AT SAINT LOUIS, AND OF OSAGE AND GASCONADE RIVERS, MISSOURI, AND OF KASKASKIA RIVER, ILLINOIS.

Officer in charge, Maj. A. M. Miller, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. C. B. Comstock, Corps of Engineers.

1. Removing snags and wrecks from Mississippi River.—Before this work was inaugurated the navigation of the river was very much interfered with by numerous snags, logs, etc., which had lodged in the channel, and to which a new accession was brought down on each rise of the river, thus constantly adding new and unknown obstructions to those already there. A large number of wrecks also occupied the channel and were very dangerous to the safety of passing boats.

For the removal of these obstructions appropriations were made as early as 1824, and the project adopted consisted in building boats suitable for removing the snags, etc., and operating them whenever the stage of water was favorable for the work and funds were available.

The total amount expended for this purpose can not be definitely given, as previous to the appropriation made by act of March 3, 1879, a general amount was appropriated to be applied to several streams as their needs required. From March 3, 1879, when the first specific appropriation was made, up to June 30, 1891, $810,760.77 was expended for this purpose. The navigation of the river has been very materially improved by this method and the danger to boats lessened.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $98,250 was expended. Two snag boats were employed between the mouth of the Missouri River and Natchez, Miss., removing obstructions. The boats worked for a total of 14 months, removing 3,389 snags, cutting down 20,571 trees, removing 30 drift piles, and traveling a distance of 13,043 miles. This work greatly benefited navigation and commerce.

The boats were thoroughly overhauled and repaired and placed in good working order. The new boilers ordered for the Macomb during the previous fiscal year were received and placed on the boat; a new butting-beam was also placed on this boat.

An annual appropriation has been made for carrying on this work.

Amount drawn under section 7, act of August 11, 1888.

$98, 250 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

98, 250 July 1, 1892, amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

100,000 (See Appendix X 1.)

2. Mississippi River between the Ohio and Illinois rivers.-The orig. inal condition of the navigable channel of this portion of the Mississippi River, before the work of improvement was begun, was such that the natural depth at low water was in many places from 31 to 4 feet, and the water was scattered by islands, which formed sloughs behind them, thus wasting the water available for low-water navigation.

The project adopted for improvement consists in closing these sloughs, and, by contraction works, the concentration of the water between banks 2,500 feet apart, the object being thereby to obtain a depth of 8 feet in the channel between St. Louis and Cairo, and 6 feet between Grafton and St. Louis at standard low water, or at a stage corresponding to a reading of 4 feet on the St. Louis gauge.

The amountexpended up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $4,129,014.16 and the condition of the improvement at that time was such that but little trouble was experienced between St. Louis and Lucas Crossing, a distance of 30 miles, as far as the work of improvement had been carried on June 30, 1891, and then only at extreme low water. For stages of water above 4 feet on the St. Louis gauge there was generally a depth of at least 6 feet in the channel,

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $276,168.99, and was applied to repairing plant, and carrying on works at the following localities:

Alton.—This work consisted in building an extension of 2,400 feet to the stone dike erected in 1882 and 1884, also in raising the crest of old dike 3 feet for a distance of 800 feet at its lower end. The object of the work was to prevent the further formation of a bar in front of the Alton landing and to wash away what had already formed. The work was commenced on August 10, 1891, and completed May 3, 1892. The effect of this work can not be determined until the next low-water season, as during the time of construction and since then, the Missouri River was higher than the Mississippi River, and in consequence backwater from the former so deadened the current that the work had but little effect on the deposit in the harbor. At least one high water from the Mississippi, when the Missouri is at a lower stage, is required before any material change can be expected. The amount expended on this work during the fiscal year was $49,948.78.

Rush Tower.-Work at this locality consisted in an extension of the general plan of improvement, so as to include this section of the river. Work was commenced just prior to the close of the previous fiscal year and was continued during the present one. A series of four hurdles, of an aggregate length of 5,920 feet, was built on the east side of the river at James Landing; another series of three hurdles, having an aggregate length of 3,790 feet, was built on the west side near Wilcox Landing, and the bank at Calico Island was protected for a distance of 4,000 feet.

The object of this work was to concentrate the water into one channel at low water, it being scattered through three or four. At the close of the fiscal year a high stage of water still prevailed, and the full effect of the work will not be apparent until next low-water season. The amount expended at this locality during the fiscal year was $181,066.

Ste. Genevieve.—The project for the improvement of the river at this

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