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point bad for its object the retention of the channel at Little Rock, the landing for Ste. Genevieve. To do this a series of three hurdles was built on the opposite side of the river, and they have been successful in obtaining the desired results. Work was in progress on these hurdles at the close of the last fiscal year and they were completed July 17. To induce a further fill, the wattling on the hurdles was raised to the 20foot stage during the month of March. The amount expended during the fiscal year was $31,422.71.

Surveys.-A resurvey of the river, from the head of Carrolls Island to the foot of the Rush Tower work and at Ste. Genevieve, was made for the purpose of determining changes in the banks and channel of the river.

The original estimated cost of this work, as revised in 1883, was $16,997,100, of which amount $4,529,600 has been appropriated. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$400, 365. 81 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

276, 168.99 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

124, 196.85 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

3, 827.58 July 1, 1892, balance available

120, 369. 27 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 *

525, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

645, 369.27 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 11, 942,500.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1894 t...

758, 333. 33 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river

and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix X 2.) 3. Harbor at St. Louis, Missouri.—The St. Louis Harbor may be divided into two parts, the upper and the lower, the line of division being the Eads Bridge. The upper portion, included between the bridge and the northern limits of the city, is about 10 miles in length, of which the only part to be considered as at present included in the practical harbor is the reach between the Eads Bridge and the Merchants Bridge, 3 miles in extent. This reach was obstructed by middle bars and by shoals near the Illinois shore, which interfered with landings on that side and rendered navigation difficult. The lower portion, included between the bridge and River des Peres, is 8 miles long, and the channel is good at all stages of water, the landings being easily accessible at all points.

The project adopted for the improvement of the harbor consisted in contracting the width of the river between the Merchants and Eads bridges to an average width of about 2,000 feet by constructing a series of hurdles extending out from the Illinois shore, which would cause a new bank to be built up between them.

The amount expended in building these hurdles, up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $109,303.77, and at that time the effect of the work was quite appreciable, a considerable fill having taken place between the hurdles.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $41,226.44 was expended in building hurdle No. 5 of this system, which had previously been omitted on account of a ferry landing; in the extension of No. 8 to the

* This appropriation was made for improving Mississippi River between mouths of the Ohio and Missouri rivers.

# For continuing work between mouths of the Ohio and Missouri rivers.

river line; in the repair of Nos. 6 and 7; in wattling Nos. 2 to 11, and in the sinking drift above the hurdles.

The effect of this work, as far as obtaining increased depths in the channel, can not be determined until the low-water season of next fall. Soundings have shown that a large fill has taken place between the hurdles and it is confidently expected that the work will do all that is required, especially after the unusual and prolonged high-water season of this spring

The full amount of the estimate has been appropriated for this work. With the balance remaining on hand it is proposed to repair the damage caused to hurdles by ice and drift and extend them wherever found necessary. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$72, 696.23 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

41, 226.44 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

31, 469. 79 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

230.04 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

31, 239. 75 (See Appendix X 3.)

4. Gasconade River, Missouri.—The navigation on this river was seri. ously interfered with by snags, logs, and leaning timber, and at times almost suspended by reason of shoal crossings. Its improvement was commenced in 1880 and the project adopted consisted in the removal of snags and logs from the bed of the river, in the cutting of leaning timber from the banks, and in the construction of wing dams and training walls at the shoals, to concentrate the water and thereby increase the depth.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $42,615.96, and resulted in improved facilities for navigation as well as in a prolongation of the boating season.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $2,073.55 was expended in repairing and raising dam at Pryor's Mill, which resulted in an increased flow of water around the left chute at that point and an increase in depth of 4 inches. The following obstructions were also removed froin the bed and banks of the river between Arlington and the foot of Pryors Bend, thereby affording better facilities for navigation: 419 snags, logs, etc.; 8 rack heaps; 1 bowlder, and 2,153 trees. July 1, 1891, balance unexpendel

$3,884.04 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

2, 073.55 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 810.49 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities. July 1, 1892, balance available

1, 748. 37 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

4,000.00 Amount available for riscal year ending June 30, 1893

5, 748.37 (See Appendix X 4.)

5. Osage River, Missouri.—Before any improvements were made the navigation on this river was rendered difficult by reason of numerous snags and other obstructions, and at times suspended, owing to insufficient depth of water over shoal crossings.

The first improvement of this river was undertaken by the State of Missouri, about thirty to thirty-five years ago, and consisted in an attempt to concentrate the water in a narrow channel over the shoals by means of wing dams built out from one or both banks, and thus deepen it.

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The General Government assumed charge of the improvement in 1871, and the first efforts were expended in an attempt to deepen the water over the shoals by dredging; after this the method pursued consisted in training walls so as to regulate the width of water way suitable to the low-water discharge of the river. This method is still pursued. Snags and other obstructions found in the channel were also removed and leaning timber was cut from the banks. The construction of a lock and dam near the mouth of the river was also authorized by the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $205,929.47, the result of which was that the navigation was materially improved, the channel having been cleared of the worst obstructions and the water deepened at several of the shoalest crossings.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $5,772.25 was expended in preparing plans for lock and dam, in gauging the river, in repairing plant, and in the removal of 66 snags, 342 trees, 42 drift piles from the bed and banks of the river. This latter work has cleared the river of obstructions from the mouth to a point 80 miles above, and it is now in good navigable condition for most of the year. New obstructions may be expected from time to time, with each rise and fall in the river, and will require removal. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...,

$54, 070.53 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

5, 772. 25 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

48, 298. 28 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

481. 13 July 1, 1892, balance available......

47, 817. 15 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892 .

50,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ......

97, 817. 15 Amount (estimated) required for completion of lock and dam ... 110,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix X 5.)

6. Kaskaskia River, Illinois.—The original condition of this river was such that navigation at low water was almost, if not entirely, suspended by reason of snags, shoals, and bars, and depended to a great extent on the stage of water in the Mississippi River as to its duration. The least depth found, when the St. Louis gaugeread 6.5 feet, was9 inches, over what is called the “Nine-mile Shoal,” 6 miles above its mouth, which virtually “blocked” the river at low water. At high water navigation was possible as far up as New Athens.

The first appropriation for improving the river was made in 1890, and the project adopted for its improvement consisted in excavating a channel through the shoals of such a depth as would insure a lowwater navigation of 36 inches, and in the removal of snags and obstructions from the channel.

No money was expended on this work up to close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the river not having been at a suitable stage since the appropriation was made to warrant starting work, consequently no change had occurred in the conditions of the river at that date.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $5,760.48 was expended in blasting a channel 75 feet in width in the clear, and of an average depth of 36 inches at low water, through the “Nine-Mile Shoal,” also at channel through the “Evansville Shoal” 60 feet wide and 34 inches deep at low water, and in removing the snags found in the channel of

the river between those shoals. The result of this work was to enable boats to enter the river at lower stages of water than formerly and also to prolong the low-water boating season as far up as Evansville. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$6,000.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

5, 760.48 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

239.52 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

4,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

4, 739.52 (See Appendix X 6.)

IMPROVEMENT OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN MOUTH OF ILLINOIS

RIVER AND MINNEAPOLIS, AND OPERATING AND CARE OF DES MOINES RAPIDS CANAL AND DRY DOCK.

Officer in charge, Maj. A. Mackenzie, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers.

1. Operating snag boats and dredge boats on Upper Mississippi River.-At the beginning of the fiscal year there was available, under act of August 11, 1888, the sum of $25,000.

From July 1 to October 31, 1891, and from May 12 to 31, 1892, the snag boat General Barnard was employed removing snags and other obstructions and assisting interests of navigation between Minneapolis and the mouth of the Missouri River.

The snag boat J. G. Parke, dredge Phænix, launch Elsie, and a number of dump boats were employed as a dredging and wrecking plant from July 1 to October 31, 1891, between St. Paul and Keokuk.

The total amount expended for snag-boat service on the Upper Mississippi River between Minneapolis and the mouth of the Missouri River to June 30, 1891, is $599,010.

By the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, provision was made for operating snag boats and dredge boats on the Upper Mississippi River under a permanent appropriation, the sum so expended not to exceed the amount appropriated in said act for such purpose. The clause of the act regulating the annual expenditure for snag boats and dredge boats on the Upper Mississippi River is as follows:

Fer operating snag boats and dredge boats on Upper Mississippi River, twenty-five thousand dollars.

The total amount of freight transported on the Upper Mississippi River during the calendar year 1891 was, approximately, 4,200,000 tons. June 30, 1892, amount drawn from Treasury under permanent appropria

$25,000.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

25,000.00 July 1, 1892, amount available under permanent appropriation of Angust 11, 1888, for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

25,000.00 (See Appendix Y 1.)

2. Mississippi River between Des Moines Rapids and mouth of Illinois River.-Operations in this district were in charge of Maj. E. H. Ruffner, Corps of Engineers, to January 16, 1892, when charge of this district was transferred to Maj. A. Mackenzie, Corps of Engineers.

Maj. Mackenzie presents a report, compiled from office records, on the work of the first half of the fiscal year. In 1892 very little work has been done, on account of high water.

Under this appropriation the improvement of through navigation is

tion

chiefly carried on, although allotments have from time to time been made for special work. Work has been in progress under approved projects since 1878, and very favorable results have been secured, showing that with a continuance of the work under liberal appropriations, the low-water channel of the Mississippi River between Des Moines Rapids and mouth of Illinois River can be made easily naviga ble at all stages for the class of boats using the river.

The interests for which the improvement is being made are very large and important. The general project for the improvement proposes the contraction of the channel or water way by means of wing dams and dams closing side chutes to such an extent as, by means of the scour thereby caused, to afford a channel of sufficient width and of a depth of 4.5 feet at low water to be eventually increased to 6 feet. There was expended under this head of appropriation to June 30, 1891, the sum of $1,208,594.91.

During the past year work has been carried on by days' labor and use of Government plant in vicinity of Clarksville at Cottonwood Island Reach, at foot of Hickory Chute, above Hannibal, and between Canton and Lagrange, aud by contract in Quincy Bay.

The river and harbor act approved July 13, 1892, appropriated $600,000 for improving Mississippi River between mouth of Missouri River and Minneapolis, and authorized the Secretary of War to carry on the work continuously by entering into additional contracts, or otherwise, to be paid for as appropriations may be made therefor. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$121, 310.91 June 30, 1892, miscellaneous receipts.

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121, 405. 11 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

60,541.35 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

60, 863. 76 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

$153. 82 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 28, 783. 72

28, 937.54 July 1, 1892, balance available...

31, 926. 22 (See Appendix Y 2.)

3. Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi Rirer.—This work was commenced in 1867. The adopted plan provided for the building of a closed canal 8 miles long and for cutting an open channel in the rock bed of the river over the remaining 4 miles of rapids. The canal was opened in August, 1877, though not fully completed, and has been in operation since that time.

During the past year the work of protecting the outside slope of the canal embankment was continued and the raising of the middle lock walls was completed. The work remaining to be done under approved project is the removal of a small amount of rock above grade, the completion of the sluice at Prices Creek, and the completion of the protection of canal embankment.

There has been appropriated and allotted for this work the sum of $4,574,950. The net cost to the United States has been, to June 30, 1891, $4,550,130.83. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$10, 230.99 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4, 388.56 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

5,812. 43 (See Appendix Y 3.)

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