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$4, 796, 99 4, 747.55

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year
July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.
July 1, 1892, balance available....
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

49. 44 10.46

38.98 8,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

8, 038.98

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ..... 18, 200.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix Z 4.) 5. Minnesota River, Minnesota.From 1867 to 1873 Congress appropriated $77,500 for improving the Minnesota River. The appropriations were applied to removing snags and bowlders, so as to afford a least depth at low-water stage of 2 to 3 feet. In 1874 a survey was made from the mouth of the river to South Bend, a distance of about 116 miles, to determine the practicability of improving the navigation by means of canals, locks, and dams. Based upon this survey, estimates were made for five locks and dams and removal of snags, etc., at a cost of $ 733,868.63, the cost of removing snags, etc., being therein placed at $34,585.10, including contingencies. Following this report, Congress made three appropriations, of $10,000 each by acts approved March 3, 1875, August 14, 1876, and June 18, 1878, which sums were applied to clearing the river of obstructions below South Bend.

Èxpended to June 30, 1879, $117,457.

Since 1879 no work for the improvement of the river has been undertaken. Under the appropriations above named the removal of obstructions cleared the way over long stretches of the river between Minnesota Falls and a point about 30 miles below Henderson (16.7 miles above Shakopee). Little or no use was made of the cleared channels, as there was not sufficient water in the channel to permit navigation during the low-water periods. The rapidly caving banks on the upper section of this stream cause snags and leaning trees to form, so that channels that were cleared of them 12 years ago are more or less encumbered with them to-day.

No expenditures have been made for the improvement of the lower part of the river, which affords much better facilities for river traffic than the upper part.

From Shakopee to the Mississippi the river is deep except on two bars. There are few snags on this reach.

The river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, appropriated $10,000 for improving the Minnesota River, including protection of the banks opposite the borough of Belle Plaine. It appearing from an examination made in September, 1888, that the sum was inadequate for the purposes named, its expenditure for work of improvement was deferred until the further wishes of Congress in the matter might be known.

Total expended on the improvement of the whole river to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $117,532. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$9, 967.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

9,967,00 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

9. 79 July 1, 1892, balance available....

9, 957. 21

( Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... $693, 868. 63 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix Z 5.)

6. Red River of the North, Minnesota and North Dakota.--The project for the improvement of this river from Breckenridge to the northern boundary line, adopted in 1877 and amended as to cost in 1883, consists in the removal of snags, leaning trees, and bowlders, and in dredging channels through the bars, at an estimated cost of $179,310. A revised estimate made, in 1887, placed the cost of completing the improvement at $79,598.37.

Before improvement the ruling depth upon bars between Moorhead and Goose Rapids at ordinary low water was but 14 feet and below Grand Forks 2 feet, while between Moorhead and Abercrombie the navigation was at all times difficult.

The work to June 30, 1891, has resulted in opening a channel 3 feet deep at ordinary low water and 60 feet wide froin Moorhead to a point 80 miles north, and a channel 4 feet deep at ordinary low water and about 70 feet wide from Grand Forks to a point 62 miles north by river; also in the removal of snags and trees between Moorhead and Abercrombie so as to afford safe passage for steamers between those points during high and medium stages of water.

Total amount expended, including outstanding liabilities, to June 30, 1891, $198,932.58.

Dredging operations in 1891 were continued to October 28 on the reach of river north of Grand Forks, and resulted in extending the dredged channels 22 miles. The excavated channels are 4 feet in depth at low water and aggregate 21,510 feet in length; 100,442 cubic yards of material was removed. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$19, 158. 83 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

17, 091. 78 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

2,067.05 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

1,300.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

767.05 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

25,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

25, 767. 05 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 9, 598. 37 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix 2 6.)

7. Gauging Mississippi River at or near St. Paul, Minnesota.- The Board of Engineers, to whom was referred the project for the application of $37,500 appropriated by the river and harbor act of August 5, 1886, for reservoirs at headwaters of Mississippi River, recommended in their report dated May 24, 1887, " that such gaugings be made at or near St. Paul during the annual operation of the reservoirs as shall determine accurately the discharge at that point at critical periods." (Page 1692, Annual Report, Chief of Engineers, 1887.)

The river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, authorized the gaugings, and provided for them as follows:

And the Secretary of War shall cause such gaugings to be made at or near St. Paul during the annual operation of said reservoirs as shall determine accurately the discharge at that point, the cost of the same to be paid out of the annual appropriation for gauging the waters of the Mississippi River and its tributaries.

Sec. 6. That for the purpose of securing the uninterrupted gauging of the waters of the Lower Mississippi River and its tributaries, as provided for in joint resolution of the twenty-first of February, eighteen hundred and seventy-one, upon the application of the Chief of Engineers, the Secretary of War is hereby authorized to draw his warrant or requisition from time to time upon the Secretary of the Treasury for such sums as may be necessary to do such work, not to exceed in the aggregate for each year the amount appropriated in this act for such purpose: Provided, however, That an itemized statement of said expenses shall accompany the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers.

Gaugings were not made until the fall of 1889, although an allotment of $900 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1889, had been made. On account of the lateness in the season and the condition of the river, it was not deemed advisable to expend any of the money that year.

The allotments of $600, $900, and $900, made for fiscal years 1889–90, 1890–91, and 1891–92, were applied to gauging the Mississippi River at St. Paul; and, when necessary, the Minnesota River at its mouth.

During the past fiscal year 135 gaugings have been made. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$1, 179. 07 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

1, 133. 85 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

4:, 22 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

45. 22

500.00

Amount allotted for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

(See Appendix Z 8.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890.

The required preliminary examination of Red River of the North and tributaries above Fergus Falls and Crookston, Minnesota, and of Big Stone Lake, Minnesota and South Dakota, with a view to improving navigation thereon by the erection of suitable dams, or by such other means as may be deemed best, was made by the local engineer in charge, Maj. Jones, and report thereon submitted through Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Northwest Division. It is the opinion of Maj. Jones, and of the division engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred by me, Maj. Jones was charged with and has completed its survey and submitted report thereon.

The plan of improvement presented contemplates the formation of two reservoir systems, at Red Lake and Lake Traverse, at the headwaters of tributaries to the Red River of the North, for the purpose of diminishing the effects of floods and of storing water for use at low stages in the Red River system.

The plan for the Red Lake reservoir system contemplates the construction of a reservoir dam, with a lock, in Red Lake River near the outlet of the lake. Navigation up Red Lake River to the lake is to be provided for by the construction of locks and dams at Crookston and Thief River.

The plan for the Lake Traverse reservoir system contemplates the diversion of Otter Tail River into Rabbit and Bois de Sioux rivers, by constructing a dam and canal near Breckenridge; construction of a dam and lock in Bois de Sioux River below the mouth of the Rabbit; and construction of a dam at the foot of Big Stone Lake, and excavation of a canal to connect Big Stone Lake with Lake Traverse.

The estimated cost of these works, not including flowage damages, is as follows: Red Lake system: Red Lake dam and lock....

$150,000 Dam and lock near Thief River.

150,000 Lake Traverse system:

$300,000 Dam and lock in Bois de Sioux River below Rabbit River .... 150,000 Canal between Otter Tail River and Rabbit River, near Breck. enridge....

60,000 Dam across Otter Tail River

20,000 Dam at foot of Big Stone Lake...

150,000 Canal between Big Stone Lake and Lake Traverse.

30, 000

410,000 Surveys and contingencies

* 150,000 Total...

860, 000 Maj. Jones also suggests that a canal 55 miles long could be con. structed from Red Lake to Rainy Lake River (which empties into the Lake of the Woods), extending navigation to that region, at a cost of about $15,000 per mile.

The amount of commerce on the Red River of the North does not justify undertaking a project of this magnitude, and in my opinion the river is not worthy of improvement to this extent by the General Gov. ernment.

The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 127, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix Z 9.)

IMPROVEMENT OF MISSOURI RIVER ABOVE SIOUX CITY, IOWA, AND

OF YELLOWSTONE RIVER, MONTANA AND NORTH DAKOTA. Officer in charge, Capt. Charles F. Powell, Corps of Engineers; Divi. sion Engineer, Col. o. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers.

1. Missouri River between the Great Falls, Montana, and Sioux City, Iowa.-The river above Fort Benton, the head of navigation, to the foot of the falls is seriously obstructed by numerous rapids and rocks. This part of the river is the tailing out of the Great Falls. No work has been done upon it and none is proposed.

From Fort Benton to Carroll, Mont., called the Rocky River, 168 miles long, the channel was originally obstructed by bowlders, short turns and sharp slopes, and insufficient low water depth on bars for 30-inch draft boats. The original project was to remove obstructive bowlders. To this was added the building of cut-off and wing dams for causing scour of the bottom, or lengthening of the slopes by raising the water at their lower ends, or for both these objects. Dredging was also added to the project.

To June 30, 1891, $329,580.32 had been expended thereon. To that date the most obstructive bowlders had been removed, some dams built, and dredging done, giving a 3-foot or deeper channel at the improved places, except at extreme low water, for part of the places.

During the year ending June 30, 1892, 5 dams were repaired or extended, 4 dams or sills built, bank protection was made at one place, channels dredged through three bars, and 251 bowlders, averaging about one-half cubic yard in size, were removed.

On the Sandy River, viz, below Carroll, the river becomes more and more unstable going downstream, and carries more and more sediment, until at Sioux City it is called the “Big Muddy,” the banks in

the bottoms cave, numerous shoals exist, floods and ice gorges occasionally cause cut-offs or radical shiftings of the channel, and snags and bowlders obstruct it. The project here is to remove snags, wrecks, and other obstructions, and to temporarily improve the worst crossings, on which project to June 30, 1891, $42,604.10 had been expended.

During the year ending June 30, 1891, 322 snags, 3 ponton-bridge stone sinkers, and 312 bank trees or stumps were removed; also a channel was opened by steamboat sluicing through a bad bar near Washburn, N. Dak., last October.

A detailed hydrographic and topographic survey of the river and banks to the highlands from Fort Bentoni, Mont., to Sioux City, Iowa, is in execution. The survey is based on a system of triangulation between river bluffs and a duplicated line of primary levels. A series of small-scale maps and one of large-scale detail charts are being made. To June 30, 1891, $81,534.59 had been expended on the river survey.

During the year ending June 30, 1892, bench marks were placed and primary levels run from Poplar Creek, Montana, to Fairbank, S. Dak., 574 miles; tertiary triangulation, hydrography, and topography were completed from Wolf Point, Mont., to next below Cannon Ball, N. Dak., 461 miles; the triangulation and back topography were run from end of the

completed work to Fairbank, S. Dak., 144 miles; 63 detail charts, from Fort Benton to Wolf Point were completed and 51 of them placed with the printer for publication; preliminary or small-scale chart No. 1 was completed, except title, and No. 2 one-half finished; the 8 preliminary maps from Wolf Point to Cannon Ball were penciled, and the 58 detail charts of the same series three-fourths finished.

The location for an ice harbor at Rock Haven, near Mandan, having been approved, was surveyed; it is expected to improve the locality this fall for the purpose stated.

The engineer in charge recommends the rectification and permanent channel improvement of the river at Pierre and Fort Pierre, s. Dak.; the Bismarck reach, North Dakota, 25 miles, and the Yankton-Sioux City reach, South Dakota and Nebraska, 130 miles, for reasons for which see appendix. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended .

$267, 896. 11 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

156.909.30 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

110, 986.81 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

17, 721. 47 July 1, 1892, balance available

93, 265.34 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

150,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

243, 265. 34 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project *. 175,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A A 1.)

2. Yellowstone River, Montana and North Dakota.—The project con. sists in rock removal and building closing dams and wing dams for confining the water to one channel, from Glendive, Mont., to the mouth of the river. The amount expended thereon to June 30, 1891, is $106,983.80.

The channel was originally obstructed by rocks, and also, and now in part, by swift rapids, sharp turns, and insufficient depths at bars.

* This amount includes estimate for bank protection authorized by river and har. bor act approved July 13, 1892.

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