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Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... $11,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B B 4.)

5. Cumberland River, Tennessee and Kentucky.--. Below Nashville (191 miles).-An examination was made of this section in 1871, upon which the original project of improvement was based. The project was modified in 1888 by the recommendation of a Board of Engineers to improve navigation at the mouth of the river by the construction of a pile and stone dike, for which Congress made provision in river and harbor act of September 19, 1890. A survey was made of the Cumberland River below Nashville in 1889 5 to ascertain if necessary to establish locks and dams."

In 1871 the obstructions were found to be of the same general character throughout, consisting of rock reefs, sand and gravel bars, bowlders, snags, and overhanging trees, and other surface obstructions. The project comprises the deepening of the channel by excavation and the use of wing dams; the removing of snags and surface obstructions, and the modifying of the channel at the mouth of the Cumberland, from Smithland to the deep waters of the Ohio, by the construction of a pile dike with crib superstructure.

The total amount expended to June 30, 1891, including outstanding indebtedness, was $267,257.10, and this expenditure has resulted in obtaining an increased depth at low water at some of the worst obstructions, and thereby securing a lengthened season of navigation, and from year to year the channel was cleared of snags and other surface obstructions.

During the present fiscal year, from July until December, the snagboat Weitzel was employed in clearing the river below Nashville, removing a large number of snags, sunken logs, and overhanging trees, and also two old sunken hulls, reducing rock points, sand and gravel bars in channel, and placing buoys on dams to mark their location at high-water stages.

From August to December the work of dike construction was continued under contract at mouth of the river; 1,081 piles were driven, and 10,045.45 cubic yards of stone, and 1,636.89 cords of brush, were placed in dike and as shore protection.

The amount expended during the fiscal year, including outstanding indebtedness, was $21,435.69, as follows: For general improvement," $7,413.80, and for “at mouth of river," $14,021.89. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$38,710.99 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year. July 1, 1892, balance inexpended.

17, 462. 16 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$156, 86 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleteil contracts. 5, 370.91

5,527. 77

21, 278.83

July 1, 1892, balance available

11,934. 39 Amount appropria by act approved July 13, 1892

40,000.00 Aniount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

51, 934. 39 Amount (estimated) reqnired for completion of existing project...... 153, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. b. Above Nashville.-From Nashrille to head of Smith Shoals (337 miles).-The present project is based on an instrumental survey of this

section made in 1883, and provides for the complete canalization of the river from Nashville to head of Smith Shoals, by the construction of 23 locks and dams below Burnside, and 7 locks and 2 dams at Smith Shoals, at an estimated cost of $7,500,000; of this amount $775,000 has been appropriated and the amount expended to June 30, 1891, including outstanding indebtedness, was as follows: For channel work $12,212.52, for canal work $64,927.93; total, $77,140.45, which sum was applied to purchases of sites of locks, dams, and lock-keepers' houses at Locks Nos. i and 2; construction of lock-keeper's house, building coffer dam and excavating pit of Lock 1, and payments on stone for masonry of lock and abutment, and contingencies pertaining to entire work under contract; and to rebuilding and refitting snag-boat Weitzel, clearing the channel of snags, reducing rock and gravel bars, and extending and repairing riprap dams to maintain the improvements already secured.

During the present fiscal year the channel was cleared of snags, etc., below the mouth of Caney Fork River by the snag boat Weitzel and the snagging party moving down the Cumberland River having completed the season's operations on the Caney Fork River; the cost of this work, $1,547.56, was paid for from the appropriation of August 2, 1882, for improving Cumberland River above mouth of the Jellico, Kentucky, and made available for this purpose by act of September 19, 1890. At the close of the year a steam-derrick boat and quarter boat were fitted up for snagging and repairing dams of the upper Cumberland; work was begun at Orchard Landing, 250 miles above Nashville on June 18, and on June 30 reached Neely Shoals, having worked over a reach of 24 miles of river. Operations in channel will be continued down stream. Examinations were made in June of the obstructions at Salt Lick Island, Holliman Island, and Bartlett Shoals, the channel being badly obstructed at those points.

Four contracts were in force during the fiscal year, and operations were continued upon Locks Nos. 1 and 2 and abutment of Dam 1 during the first half of the year, and the following work was done at Lock 1: One thousand four hundred and twenty-seven cubic yards of earth and 2,030 cubic yards of rock were excavated, and 4,447 cubic yards of masonry laid; at abutment, Dam 1, 5,093 cubic yards of earth and 10 cubic yards of rock excavated and 407 cubic yards of masonry laid; at Lock 2, 11,949 cubic yards of earth and 616 cubic.yards of rock exca. vated. Continued high water caused a total suspension of operations from December until the middle of June, when the work of excavation was renewed at abutment of Dam 1.

The total amount expended during the present fiscal year, including outstanding indebtedness, was $66,357.86.

Actual operations having established the fact that solid rock can not be found for the foundation of Lock No. 2 at anything like the depths specified in the contract, and that the character of the site at the depths so specified is altogether too insecure for the masonry of the lock, the contract of February 24, 1891, with Messrs. Rich and Holmes, for building Lock No. 2, will be terminated, in accordance with its provis. ions for such termination. At the close of the fiscal year this matter was in process of adjustment.

The intent of the proposed system of locks and dams being to reach the coal fields and to develop the coal trade of the Upper Cumberland, and to provide a safe and uninterrupted channel for the same, the engineer officer in charge recommended that operations be begun at Smith Shoals, in accordance with the legislation of the act of Congress of September 19, 1890, appropriating money for work at that obstruction,

thereby to connect the coal region with the Cumberland at the present head of navigation at Burnside, Ky., as soon as practicable. This recommendation was approved, and the preliminary arrangements are now in progress for organizing the necessary survey party to examine the shoals, and take observations to determine the volume and velocity of the currents, and steps will be taken as soon as practicable to select sites and acquire title to the necessary lands, etc. In order to maintain an open river the lowerdams of the series will not be constructed until they are required as aids to navigation, which will not be until a large number of the lower locks are built, provision being made for clearing the river of surface obstructions from year to year and maintaining the improvements already secured at several localities. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$148, 318.60 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

61, 901.49 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

383, 417.11 July 1, 1892, outside liabilities..

1, 456. 37 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 220, 882.53

222, 338, 90 July 1, 1892, balance available....

161, 078. 21 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

250,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

411, 078.21 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 6,725,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. c. Above mouth of the Jellico, Kentucky.Under the provisions of the act of September 19, 1890, $4,922.02 of the $5,000 appropriated by act of August 2, 1882, has been expended in the removal of snags and sand bars in the Cumberland River above Nashville, of which sum $1,547.56 was expended during the present fiscal year. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1, 625.54 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

1,547.56 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

77.98 (See Appendix B B 5.) 6. Caney Fork River, Tennessee.—This stream, after a course of about 200 miles wholly in the State of Tennessee, empties into the Cumberland River at Carthage, Tenn., about 116 miles above Nashville, Tenn. It is the largest and one of the important tributaries of the Cumberland River.

An examination was made in 1879 as high up as Sligo Ford, about 72 miles, and in 1886 it was extended 20 miles farther to Frank Ferry, the head of navigation. The principal difficulties were found to be rock reefs, gravel, and sand bars, a crooked, shallow channel, greatly impeded by surface obstructions.

The present project is to improve the river below Frank Ferry, 92 miles, by removing drift and other surface obstructions, and in building the wing dams and training walls necessary to insure safe navigation for small steamboats and flatboats during the boating season, usually about five months in duration, from February to July.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, including outstanding indebtedness, was $23,353.49, which was used in removing surface obstructions, in reducing sand and gravel bars, and in repairing and building dams, and has resulted in a greatly improved channel at the 3-foot stage above low water from Frank Ferry to Mine Lick Shoals, about 32 miles.

Work in the channel was in progress at the close of the last fiscal year and was continued until August 15, 1891, when active operations were suspended, the appropriation being nearly exhausted. The work consisted of clearing the channel of surface obstructions from Mine Lick Island to mouth of the river, about 60 miles. Thirty cubic yards of rock and 227 snags were taken out and 5,969 overhanging trees were removed or deadened. Amount expended during the fiscal year, including outstanding indebtedness, was $-,501.86. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$2, 535.24 June 30, 1892, amount expended during tiscal year

2, 481.86 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

53. 38 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

20.00 July 1, 1892, balance available ....

33. 38 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 20, 228,00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B B 6.)

7. South Fork of Cumberland River, Kentucky.—This stream is a tributary of the Cumberland River, which it enters at Burnside, Ky., and about 325 miles above Nashville.

An examination was made in 1880. Its upper waters were found to be so greatly obstructed by immense sandstone bowlders as to render improvement impracticable. The lower river from Devils Jumps to mouth, a distance of about 44 miles, was considered worthy of improvement, and the project adopted sought to obtain a safe channel for flatboats and rafts at a 3-foot stage above low water by clearing the channel of surface obstructions and by the construction of wing dams, to deepen the water on the sand and gravel bars below the Devils Jumps.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, including outstanding indebtedness, was $11,968.94, the expenditure of which resulted in obtaining safe navigation for rafts and flatboats for a distance of about 16 miles from its mouth. Work in channel was suspended in September, 1887. There were no disbursements made during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$11.03 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

41.03 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

9.97 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

31.06 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ..... 50, 803. 00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B B 7.)

IMPROVEMENT OF TENNESSEE RIVER BETWEEN CHATTANOOGA, TEN

NESSEE, AND FOOT OF BEE TREE SHOALS, ALABAMA. Officer in charge, Capt. George W. Goethals, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. C. B. Comstock, Corps of Engineers.

1. Tennessee River between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and foot of Bee Tree Shoals, Alabama.—The original condition of the river from Chattanooga to Browns Ferry, when examined in 1867 and subsequently, was found to be obstructed by rock reefs, bars, bowlders, and pro

ENG 92-18

jecting rocky points, permitting navigation from six to nine months in the year. From Browns Ferry to Florence it was not navigable except at unusually high-water stages because of the Muscle Shoals obstructions. From Florence to Riverton, Colbert and Bee Tree Shoals limited navigation to about six months in the year.

The present project consists in:

a. Removing obstructions by blasting and dredging in “The Suck” and at Bridgeport and Guntersville, Ala.

b. Building a canal 14.5 miles long, 70 to 120 feet wide, and 6 feet deep around the Big Muscle Shoals, having 9 locks, each 60 by 300 feet, and an aqueduct over Shoal Creek 900 feet long and 60 feet wide; constructing a canal 1.5 miles long with 2 locks around Elk River Shoals.

c. Blasting a channel through bed rock and building wing dams at Little Muscle Shoals; as modified in 1890, the project contemplates the building of a canal along the south bank, 3 miles long, with two locks.

d. Constructing a canal 7.8 miles long, 150 feet wide and 7 feet deep, around Colbert and Bee Tree Shoals, with 2 locks with lifts of 12 and 13 feet, respectively, near lower end and guard lock at the head; size of locks, 80 by 350 feet.

The total amount expended to June 30, 1891, including outstanding liabilities, was $3,357,539.34, and resulted in the improvement of the river as follows:

Navigation was made easier through the "Suck" and "Pan" by removal of bowlders, detached rock, overhanging trees, and projecting rocky points. Survey of "Suck" begun. At Elk River Shoals and Big Muscle Shoals the locks, gates, valves, and machinery for properly operating them were completed, the aqueduct and permanent stone dams finished, and the canal opened to navigation. At Little Muscle Shoals the channel was excavated and the wing dams built as originally projected. At Colbert and Bee Tree Shoals, channel excavation and building stone dams to contract water way have resulted in increased depth; survey for location of proposed lateral canal begun.

The amount expended during the fiscal year, including outstanding liabilities, was $194,562.93, for which the following work was done:

At the "Suck.”—The survey, covering a distance of 32 miles, was completed. The necessary plant was procured, the channel below Tumbling Shoals straightened, and the cross section of the river from head of Tumbling Shoals to the head of the “Suck" was increased by removal of bowlders and trees along the banks up to high-water mark. A contract was made for excavating a channel through Guntersville Reef.

At Elk River Shoals.—The completion of the drift sluice in the longi. tudinal dam, operated by the Parker automatic gate. Six hundred and fifty feet of the longitudinal damn that remained incomplete was finished up to grade. Below Lock B the channel was deepened and widened by dredging and blasting. The excavation through Nance Reef was completed. Lock-keepers' houses were built at Locks A and B.

At Big Muscle Shoals.-Lock-keepers' houses were built at Locks 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 9, and assistant lock-keepers' houses were erected at Locks 3, 6, and 9. A house for the storage of property was built at Lock 6. About 5 miles of the railway along the tow path was rebuilt, completing the reconstruction of the track; all the bridges along the line were strengthened by lateral bracing, Blue Water bridge remodeled, and a new bridge put up across Shoal Creek. Stone was quarried and crushed at Lock 4 quarry, and the product used for ballasting railway and paying inner slope of embankment; 4.3 miles was thus paved. Eleven thousand five hundred and forty-nine linear feet of

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