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drainage ditches was opened to empty sloughs in the bottoms. A Bucyrus dredge was completed under contract and is in operation. A light-draft towboat was built. Land for lock-keepers' houses was purchased at Locks 5 and 9; and 20 acres damaged by overflow from the canal at the mouth of Second Creek were bought.

At Colbert and Bee Tree Shoals.—The survey for location of the proposed lateral canal completed and maps platted. Center line permanently marked by stone monuments. Negotiations were made for the purchase of 309 acres of land required for the improvement. The lower lock was staked off and test pits sunk to rock under the gate abutments.

The money statement for this work is consolidated with that for Tennessee River below Bee Tree Shoals, page 267, so as to embrace the entire reach of the river below Chattanooga, as follows:

Tennessee River below Chattanooga.

$349, 885. 56

196, 495.95

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.
July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..
July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts

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July 1, 1892, balance available....

130, 725. 29 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

500,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .

630, 725. 29 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 5,837, 939.81 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix C C 1.)

2. Operating and care of Muscle Shoals Canal, Tennessee River.—The canal, opened November 10, 1890, has been in constant use. The number of steamboats, barges, and miscellaneous craft, exclusive of Gov. ernment boats engaged on the work, that passed through during the fiscal year was 132.

Two serious breaks occurred during the year, one at the west abutment of Six-Mile Dam, and one at the northeast abutment of the aqueduct; both were promptly repaired. Two balanced valves were put in filling culverts of Lock 6, and a counterbalanced slide valve in Lock 7; these were to replace worn-out slide valves. Twenty-eight thousand one hundred and sixty cubic yards of sediment was removed from the canal.

The total expenses incurred during the year were $40,232.90. Estimated expenses for 1892–93, $60,000.

(See Appendix CC 2.)

IMPROVEMENT OF OHIO, MONONGAHELA, CHEAT, ALLEGHENY, AND

MUSKINGUM RIVERS.

Officers in charge, Lieut. Col. Wm. E. Merrill, Corps of Engineers, to December 14, 1891; Maj. D. W. Lockwood, Corps of Engineers, from December 15, 1891, to February 1, 1892, and Maj. Amos Stickney, Corps of Engineers, since February 1, 1892, with Lieut. Cassius E. Gillette, Corps of Engineers, under their immediate orders to April 20, 1892.

1. Ohio River. The original condition of the navigable channel of

the Ohio River was, that navigation was almost entirely suspended during low watër by snags, ripples, rocks, sand and gravel bars, and other obstructions.

The originally adopted project for improving the navigation of the Ohio River was the removal of snags, wrecks, and other obstructions, and the construction of low dams and dikes at islands and sand bars, to contine the current to a smaller cross section. A snag boat and two dredges, all of them having iron hulls, and owned by the United States, find constant employment in taking out snags and wrecks and in dredging away gravel and rock bars that can not otherwise be removed.

An additional project for the radical improvement of the river by movable dams has been begun by the construction of one movable dam at Davis Island, 5 miles below Pittsburg, Pa. The construction of another, which will be number six in the series, has been commenced near Beaver, Pa., 29 miles below Pittsburg.

Four million eight hundred and twenty-two thousand nine hundred and sixty-two dollars and thirty-six cents has been expended on the improvement of the Ohio River up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891.

The condition of the navigable channel of the Ohio River has been greatly improved, as is shown by increased traffic, greater length of time of uninterrupted navigation, etc., but so much depends on the stage of water that it is impossible to give the results in the way of increased depth and advantages derived from amount expended during the last

fiscal year.

The following is a summary of the work done during the fiscal year:

Dam between Davis and Neville islands.-Repairs to this dam were completed August 15, 1891.

Dam at head of Marietta Island.—Repairs to this dam were completed October 21, 1891.

Dike at foot of Marietta Island.—This dike was completed October 23, 1891.

Dam at head of Blennerhassett Island.This dam was completed December 28, 1891.

Dike at Eight-mile Island. This dike was completed November 19, 1891.

Dike at Cullum.—This dike was completed December 9, 1891.

Dike at lower bar at Rising Sun.- This dike was completed November 25, 1891.

Dike at Madison.—The dike is completed, except a small amount of paving, which could have been done in two weeks had the water permitted. It will probably be finished early in the season.

Dike at Flint Island. This dike was completed November 25, 1891.

Dike at middle of Grand Chain.-Work was continued whenever the water would permit. The dike is not yet finished.

Rock bar at mouth of Licking River.—The contractor having abandoned his contract, the work was undertaken by the United States. Operations commenced June 5, 1891, and all work projected for the season was completed by November 15, 1891.

Ice pier at Kerr Run.-Was not completed, owing to high water. Ice pier at Portsmouth.— This ice pier was completed December 4, 1891.

Ice pier at Ripley.--This ice pier was completed October 31, 1891.

Great Miami embankment.--Extension of this embankment to its junction with the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad has been completed so far as funds available would permit.

Embankment at Sharoneetown.—Riprapping and paving of levee, for its protection, was completed April 5, 1892.

Big Hocking River. The work of improving navigation on this stream is paid for out of the appropriation for the improvement of the Ohio River, and it therefore appears under that heading. The object to be attained is to permit the Ohio River steamboats to ascend to Coolville, 5 miles above the mouth, during high and medium stages of the Ohio, taking advantage of the back water. The work was completed September 1, 1891.

Operations of United States dredges.-The dredges, after undergoing the usual spring repairs at Pittsburg, started down the river July 2, working wherever it was necessary until December 20, when they were put in winter quarters. During the five months they removed from the river between Pittsburg and Louisville 6 wrecks of river craft, 171 piles, 24 snags, 23,232 cubic yards of loose rock and pudding stones, and 81,564.3 cubic yards of gravel.

Removal of rock and other obstructions.-In October a small party was put to work removing dangerous obstructions from the channel between Pittsburg, Pa., and Steubenville, Ohio. During the short time the water permitted them to work they removed 332 cubic yards of rock, the wreck of a coal boat, and some snags.

Encroachments.-Information has been received at various times that parties along the Ohio River were dumping material into the river or over its banks. Investigations have been made, and wherever the parties have persisted in violating the law the matter has been reported to the United States district attorney for his action. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$317, 057.10 Sale of property

243. 71

June 30, 1892. amount expended during fiscal year...

317, 300.81 259, 114.37

58, 186.44

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities
July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

$8, 159.99
16, 331. 13

24, 491. 12

July 1, 1892, balance available....

33, 695. 32 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

360, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

393, 695. 32 (See Appendix D D 1.)

2. Operating snag boats on Ohio River:-During 1891 extensive repairs and betterments were made on the snag boat E. A. Woodruff. She worked from September 8 to November 22, removing 473 snags, 11 rocks, 1 mass of pudding stones, 3 large pieces of iron (wreckage of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Bridge), and wrecks of 9 steamboats, 24 coal boats, flats, and barges, 1 brick boat, 1 model barge, and one ferry-boat hull. The total distance traveled was 1,396 miles.

(See Appendix D D 2.)

3. Operating and care of Davis Island Dam, Ohio River, near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.—This dam was built to test the adaptability of the system of movable dams to the peculiar condition of the Whio River and to the special character of the commerce that navigates it. It was intended to be the first step in the radical improvement of the Ohio River, designed to give a minimum depth of 6 feet at all times, except when ice was running. Incidentally this dam has been of great value

to the city of Pittsburg by securing an ample depth of water in its harbor throughout the low-water season. It has also been of immense benefit to the coal trade by enabling them to bring loaded boats out of the Monongahela River at any time. The natural harbor room of Pittsburg is very limited and before the Davis Island Dam was built the great bulk of coal barges were held in the Monongahela. In short rises the amount of coal that could be shipped south was absolutely limited by the number of barges that could be locked through the lowest dam in the Monongahela during the passage of the rise. Under present conditions this limit no longer exists, and all coal can now be shipped for which towboats are available.

During the fiscal year the lock and dam have been operated successfully without the least interference with navigation. The dam has been raised and lowered four times and has been up 115 days during the

fiscal year.

(See Appendix D D 3.)

4. Movable dam in Ohio River below mouth of Beaver River, Pennsylvania.-The first appropriation for this work was made September 19, 1890, $250,000.

The land necessary for the site of this dam, on both sides of the river, has been acquired, drawings have been prepared, a project for the season's work has been submitted and approved, and the preparatory work for construction of the lock begun.

The amount expended on this work up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $1,381.23. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$248, 618. 77 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

5,361. 01 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

243, 254. 76 Jnly 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

123.92 July 1, 1892, balance available

243, 130.84 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

100, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

343, 130.84 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 550,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D D 4.)

5. Monongahela River, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.—The seven lower locks and dains on the Monongahela River belong to the Monongahela Navigation Company, and they create slack water from Pittsburg to Dunkard Creek, a distance of 88 miles. Locks and Dams Nos. 8 and 9, belonging to the United States, continue this slack water to Morgantown, W. Va., a further distance of 14 miles, the distance from Pittsburg to Morgantown being 102 miles.

The original condition of the river from the head of slack water of Mononga hela Navigation Company to Morgantown was, that it was absolutely unfitted for navigation. In 1871 a very light boat, drawing but 12 inches of water, was built for the express purpose of running to Morgantown. Slie only succeeded, however, in making five trips in the year.

The originally adopted project for the improvement of this river was the construction of two locks and dams to continue slack water to Morgantown, W. Va. The amount expended thereon up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $430,098.3+.

The improvement was completed in 1889. A few minor repairs and bettermients have been made during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. As the cost of operating these locks and dams is a charge against the indefinite appropriation for operating and care of canals and other works of navigation,” reference is made to the report under that heading for further particulars. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$801.66 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

443. 18 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

358.48 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892, for beginning work on Lock and Dam No. 10....

25,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

25, 358.48 (See Appendix D D 5.)

6. Operating and care of Locks and Dams Nos. 8 and 9, Monongahela River.-These locks and dams have been successfully operated throughout the year, and, while some minor repairs have been made to the dams and operating machinery of the locks, no stoppage to navigation was caused thereby.

(See Appendix D D 6.)

7. Purchase of Lock and Dam No.7, Monongahela River.-The case of the United States vs. The Monongahela Navigation Company, for the condemnation of this structure, was heard in the circuit court of the United States for the western district of Pennsylvania, in November, 1890, and the value of the work was fixed by the court at $209,000. The Navigation Company took an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States, where the matter is still pending. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$161, 835, 45 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

161, 835.45 (See Appendix D D 7.)

8. Purchase of Lock and Dam No. 6, Monongahela River. Under the act of Congress no steps can be taken towards the condemnation of this lock and dam until the United States has acquired title to Lock and Dam No. 7. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$167,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

167,000.00 (See Appendix D D 8.)

9. Cheat River, West Virginia.—The channel of this river was originally filled with rock obstructions, which interfered with the free passage of drifting logs, thereby making the transportation of timber from the vast forests at the head waters of this river to the markets along the Monongahela and Ohio rivers very hazardous.

The originally adopted project for the improvement of the river was the removal of rock obstructions that interfered with the free passage of logs on a 6 or 8 foot stage of water for a distance of 30 miles from Rowlesburg to Beaver Hole. This project was modified at the request of those interested in the improvement, and a low-water channel was made from Rowlesburg, 8 miles down the river, in which logs can be floated on a rise of from 2 to 3 feet. The amount expended on the project up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $5,108.15. At this time the work was progressing and continued until January 9, 1892, when this appropriation was exhausted. The river is now in fair condition as far down as Green Island, 204 miles below Rowlesburg

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