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July 1, 1891, baiance unexpended
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

$7, 891.85 .7, 881.35

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

7.50 (See Appendix D D 9.) 10. Allegheny River, Pennsylvania.-The original condition of the Allegheny River as to depth, width, and navigability, can not be stated in definite figures, as there is no defined plane from which to measure; both the low-water line and the elevation of the river bed being variable.

The approved project for the improvement of the river is the removal of obstructions from the channel and the construction of low dams to close duplicate channels, and of dikes to contine the water way where the river is too wide.

The amount expended on this project up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $161,400.12.

Much benefit to navigation has resulted. There was available at the beginning of the fiscal year $19,599.88.

The following work has been done during the fiscal year:

Dam at Cornplanter Island, 201 miles abore Pittsburg.-Construction finished.

Dam at Hickory, 157 miles above Pittsburg.-Commenced and finished during the year.

Dam at Pithole, 113 miles abore Pittsburg.-Construction finished.

Five hundred cubic yards of rock was removed from the bar at foot of Pithole Ripple, and 621 cubic yards of rock and 11 snags from the channel of the river between Kittanning and Pittsburg:

The construction of these dams and the removal of obstructions has resulted in great good to the general navigation.

Encroachments.--Navigators had frequent occasion to report parties engaged in filling material into the stream. These cases were investigated and guilty parties notified to stop their unlawful practice, which in every case they did. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$18, 599.88 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

16,977. 73

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

1, 622. 15

163.00

July 1, 1892, balance available...
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

1, 459. 15 25,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

26, 459. 15 (See Appendix D D 10.)

11. Dam at Herr Island, Allegheny River, near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.— The object of this dam is to begin a system of slack-water nav. igation and enlarge the harbor room at Pittsburg to the extent of the pool formed by the dam. The original project was for a fixed dam, but in compliance with the request of the authorities of Pittsburg and Al. legheny City, the Secretary of War has ordered that the cam at Herr Island be made a movable one.

The land required, on both banks of the river, was purchased, drawings prepared, and the work of construction was about to begin, when a nuinber of suits for damages were brought in the circuit court of the United States by riparian owners; these suits are still pending and the construction of this important work delayed thereby.

The amount expended on this work up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $36,851.77. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$70, 648. 23 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1,951.38 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

68, 696.85 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

40,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

108, 696.85 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 481,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D D 11.)

12. Ice harbor at mouth of Muskingum River, Ohio.—The object of this work was to furnish a place of refuge for Ohio River craft during ice floods.

The project was the construction of a large lock through Dam No. 1, Muskingum River, to permit Ohio River vessels to pass into the pool.

There has been expended thereon, up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $307,866.78.

The lock was nearly finished and was ready for use December 1, 1891, but it can not be made available for Ohio River craft until á draw is placed in the Baltimore and Ohio Southwestern Railroad bridge, just below it. The time granted .the railroad company for completion of the work for providing such draw expired July 1, 1892, and the work has not been done. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$20, 114, 29 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

20, 063.51 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

50. 78 (See Appendix D D 12.)

13. Operating and care of ice-harbor lock at mouth of Muskingum River, Ohio.This lock was ready for use December 1, 1891.

An allotment of $1.200 was made December 10, 1891, for its operation and care.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amounting to $852.98, were for lock-keepers and assistants, and for some minor repairs.

(See Appendix D D 13.)

14. Muskingum Rirer, Ohio.—This report is limited to work carried on under the appropriation of August 11, 1888, for the construction of a lock at Taylorsville and the reconstruction of the lock at Zanesville, Ohio.

There was expended thereon up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $66,867.84.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, some work was done on the Taylorsville Lock, but this lock can not be made available until a draw is placed in the county bridge, just below it.

The commissioners of Muskingum County, to whom the bridge belongs, were ordered to change it, but thus far they have made no move toawrds obeying the order.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$35, 301.24 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

19, 783.26 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

15, 517.98 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

370.71 July 1, 1892, balance available

15, 147.27 (See Appendix D D 14.)

15. Operating and care of locks and dams on Muskingum River, Ohio.As originally improved by the State of Ohio, 11 dams and 12 locks were built on the Muskingum River, furnishing continuous navigation for 91 miles from the Ohio River at Marietta to Dresden, where a connection was made with the Ohio Canal near its middle point, this canal extending from the Ohio River at Portsmouth to Lake Erfe at Cleveland. According to old reports from the State board of public works, the locks were built with a length between hollow quoins of 180 feet and a clear width of 36 feet, except the upper lock between Zanesville and Dresden, which had a length of 120 feet and a clear width of 22 feet. The lifts as reported varied from 8 feet 10 inches to 12 feet 1 inch, but measurements made since the United States took charge show that none of the above dimensions were strictly accurate. The work cost the State of Ohio about $1,500,000.

The lock and dam above Zanesville is now in a state of ruin, but the 75 miles of slack water between the Ohio River and Zanesville has always been maintained; on this piece of river there are 10 dams, 11 locks, and 5 lateral canals with a total length of 37 miles.

The locks and dams were about worn out when they passed into the hands of the United States, and a general reconstruction was unavoidable. This work was very greatly retarded and increased in cost by the extraordinary rainfall of the summer and autumn of 1890, which repeatedly carried away cofferdams and drowned out the work. At the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the reconstruction of Locks 3, 4, and 8 had been completed. The floods had a very disastrous effect on the dams; Nos. 1, 6, and 8 gave way, and a break took place around the abutment of Dam No. 4. The latter has been thoroughly closed, but it was impossible to do anything for the repair of the broken dams.

There had been expended on this work, up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $741,863.03.

At the beginning of the fiscal year, the season being a favorable one for work, the repairing and reconstructing of the various locks and dams on the river was progressing.

The reconstruction of Locks Nos. 6 and 7 was completel; Locks Nos. 2 and 5 were completed so far as to admit of their use; the repairs to Dams Nos. 1, 6, and 8 were finished and minor repairs made to Dams Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, and 10.

Through navigation, which had been interrupted by the closing of locks for repairs in May, 1889, was resumed with the opening of Lock No. 5, May 6, 1892.

An important decision was rendered by Judge Sage of the United States district court, southern district of Ohio, eastern division, relating to the changing of bridges by direction of the Secretary of War, under the provisions of the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890. The decision was in the case of the bridge crossing the Muskingum River at Taylorsville, Ohio, and will be found in full in the annual re. port of the officer in charge.

(See Appendix D D 15.)

IMPROVEMENT OF FALLS OF THE OHIO RIVER, OF WABASH RIVER,

INDIANA AND ILLINOIS, AND OF WHITE RIVER, INDIANA; OPERATING AND CARE OF LOUISVILLE AND PORTLAND CANAL, KENTUCKY.

Officer in charge, Lieut. Col. G. J. Lydecker, Corps of Engineers.

1. Falls of the Ohio River, at Louisville, Kentucky.-The improvements in progress under this appropriation contemplate increased facilities for passing the Falls of the Ohio River via the Louisville and Portland Canal by enlargements at its upper entrance and immediately above the locks, so as to form capacious basins, or harbors, at those points. The works involved in the enlargement at the upper end, are also closely associated with the improvement of the Indiana Chute, which seeks to provide a safe open-river channel over the falls, available for the largest tows, when the river is at, or above, a stage of 8 feet on the upper canal gange.

The project for enlargement at the head was adopted in 1883, and modified, after full consideration, by a board of engineers in 1890. Under this project the width of the canal, now 90 feet, will be increased to from 210 to 325 feet for a length of 2,400 feet, and east of this the enlarged canal will expand into a basin 800 feet wide and 2,200 feet long; the work comprises, as its principal features, the excavation of about 325,670 cubic yards of solid rock, and 270,000 cubic yards of earth, the construction of about 5,200 linear feet of masonry canal wall, and dams, containing about 26,000 cubic yards, and the removal of 6,200 linear feet of old canal wall, dikes, and timber dams. The work accomplished to June 30, 1892, was 166,882 cubic yards of rock excavation; 213,068 cubic yards of earth excavation, and 10,307.5 cubic yards of masonry laid in new canal wall.

The enlargement above the locks was inaugurated in 1887, the purpose being to construct a basin wherein boats can lie, and tows be properly formed before or after passing the locks, without interfering with navigation through the canal. The result of the improvement will be a basin 1,500 feet long with a width varying from 210 to 250 feet. The work is nearly completed. The principal items of work done on this enlargement to June 30, 1892, comprised 141,593 cubic yards of earth excavation, 17,744 cubic yards of rock excavation, and 5,807 cubic yards of canal wall laid.

The total expenditures on these improvements up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, were $618,689.43, of which the sum of $152,225.60 was expended during the last year. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

- $193, 146, 17 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

148, 182.45 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ..

44, 963. 72 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

4, 013. 15 July 1, 1892, balance available ....

40, 920.57 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

60,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

100, 920.57 Aniount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 550, 008. 89 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E E 1.)

2. Indiana Chute, Falls of the Ohio.— The Indiana Chute is the main river channel over the Falls of the Ohio; originally it was very crooked,

but oper

filled with dangerous, rocky projections from sides and bottom, and with swift changing currents. It was safely navigable by skilled pilots only when the river was above a stage of about 11 feet on the canal gauge. Prior to 1890 some of the most dangerous projections had been removed, but in that year a project for the radical improvement of the chute was adopted; this project aims to secure a channel safely navigable for the largest tows, when the river is at, or above, a stage of 8 feet on the canal gange.

Work on this project was commenced last year, ations were limited to a very short period during extreme low water.

The amount expended on the improvement of this chute, to June 30, 1892, was $137,480.37. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$48, 885. 20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

21, 361. 44 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

27, 523. 76 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

14.63 July 1, 1892, balance available

27,509, 13 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

35,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

62, 509, 13 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 57, 249.53 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E E 2.) 3. Operating and care of Louisville and Portland Canal, Kentucky.The canal was open to commerce throughout the past year, except on twenty-three days, when the locks could not be operated because of high water.

Traffic through the canal during the year comprised the passage of 6,027 boats, with 1,620,586 tons of freight, 1,232,998 tons of which was coal.

Operations relating to the care of the canal comprised dredging about 100,000 cubic yards of mud, sand, and rock from the canal and its approaches; the completion of two new middle gates; the partial reconstruction of the machine shop, which had been destroyed by fire, and such repairs as were needed from time to time to the locks, bridges, boats, buildings, and machinery.

(See Appendix E E 3.)

4. Wabash River, Indiana and Illinois.—The improvement of this river has for some years past been carried on under two different appropriations, one of which was applicable only to that portion of the river below Vincennes, Ind., and the other above.

a. Below Vincennes. The principal work in the project for this improvement has been the construction of a lock and dam to pass the Grand Rapids, near Mount Carmel, Ill. The lock was completed last year, as was also the abutment for the dam, the work done during the the year comprising 2,097 cubic yards of masonry laid, 3,074 cubic yards of earth and mud excavated, and 5,776 cubic yards of earth hauled and embanked behind lock walls and abutment of dam. Besides this work, the snag boat removed from this section of the river 429 snags, weighing 1,786 tons.

After the dam near Mount Carmel is completed, the improvement of this section of the river calls for the excavation of channels through shoals, and the construction of dams to properly concentrate the lowwater flow. This will put the river in fairly navigable condition at ordinary low-water stages.

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