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The amount expended to June 30, 1892, on the improvements of this section was $293,524.08. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$11, 800.77 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

31, 886. 36 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

6, 914.41 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

434. 68 July 1, 1892, balance available....

6, 479. 73 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

60,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

66, 479. 73 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 40,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. b. Above Vincennes.—The work of improving this portion of the river is precisely similar in character to that contemplated on the lower section, after the completion of the lock and dam at Mount Carmel; channels must be excavated through shoals, the low-water flow concentrated by dams or dikes, and the river cleared of snags. At present the river is navigable for very light draft only, at ordinary low water, and the channels are badly obstructed by snags. No work was done on this section during the past year, because the United States had no snagging outfit available, and no satisfactory arrangements could be made with private parties for doing the work. Material for rebuilding the old snag boat was procured, and the work thereon commenced toward the close of the year.

The completion of the lock and dam at Mount Carmel will establish free communication between the upper and lower sections of the river.

The amount expended on this section above Vincennes to June 30, 1892, was $72,172.02.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$5, 742. 26 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

974. 28 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

4, 767.98 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

440.00 July 1, 1892, balance available ...

4, 327.98 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

9, 327.98 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 15, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

barbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E E 4.)

5. White River, Indiana.-The river is badly obstructed by shoals and snags, and without a very considerable expenditure it is not practicable to make it available for navigation except at high and medium stages of water. Channels might be excavated through some of the worst shoals, but no material increase in navigation would thereby result. If all the snags which obstruct existing channels are cleared out, the present commercial interests on this stream will be fairly accommodated.

During the past year operations were limited to improving the channel through Kellys Ripple by constructing a guiding dike 350 feet long from the south channel dike to the adjoining river bank.

The amount expended on this river to June 30, 1892, was $104,519.96.

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7,500.00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E E 5.)

IMPROVEMENT OF GREAT KANAWHA, ELK, AND GAULEY RIVERS,

WEST VIRGINIA, AND OF NEW RIVER, VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA.

Officer in charge, Col. William P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers.

1. Great Kanauha River, West Virginia.—This river flows through a fertile and picturesque region, filled with mineral wealth, especially coal and salt. It is by nature divided into a number of pools, some of considerable length and depth, separated by shoals of gravel and coarse sand, which were the principal obstructions to navigation in low water, there being often on them at such seasons but a few inches of water. In some of the pools were found shallow places, also obstructing navigation. There were also snags and loose rocks in the channel. The navigation was almost suspended in summer.

The coal and salt were generally sent out on rises, which enabled the boats to pass safely over the obstructions that otherwise would stop their movements entirely. The use of the river for the movement of these valuable products was therefore unsatisfactory and intermittent. By the agency and superintendence of a board acting under the State, first of Virginia and then of West Virginia, considerable improvement in the river was from time to time effected, tolls being charged on the commerce for the payment of expenses.

The object of the improvement, begun several years ago by the United States, was to give a constant navigable depth of at least 6 feet throughout the whole length of the Kanawha to its mouth at the Ohio River, to be accomplished by large locks and dams.

Those already built have been about 300 by 50 feet above Charleston and about 340 by 55 below.

The peculiarity of most of the dams is that they can be lowered when the stage of the water in the river will sutlice over the shoals. This gives them the name of " movable dans," and enables an open river to be had when the water is high enough.

Dams 3 and 2, above Paint Creek, are fixed, as the declivity of the river in that section is too great to permit the advantageous use of the movable system.

Up to June 30, 1891, the amount expended was $2,182,670.65. At that date the finished works were Locks and Dams 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

An appropriation of $300,000 was made September 19, 1890. The following list of contracts indicates in a summary manner the principal work in progress during the fiscal year:

Contract dated November 26, 1888, with Carkin, Stickney & Cram, for building Lock No. 7, completed in February, 1892.

Contract with C. Irwin McDonald, dated August 20, 1889, for building Lock No. 8, completed in February, 1892.

Contract with Munford & Reynolds, dated December 29, 1890, for the foundations of Dam No. 7, or immovable parts of the navigation pass and weir, and of a central pier and an abutment with shore crib and bank protection, to be completed December 31, 1892.

Contract with C. Irwin McDonald, dated March 3, 1891, for the foundations of Dam No. 8, or immovable parts of the navigation pass and weir, and of a central pier and an abutment with shore crib and bank protection, to be completed December 31, 1892.

The amount expended in the year ending June 30, 1892, exclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $206,631.38.

Had funds been available, all the locks and dams needed for this improvement could have been begun at the same time and finished in three years with much economy to the United States and with manifest advantage in the use of the improved waterway. The development of commerce on this river has been very great since the improvement by the United States, although the project has as yet been only partially executed for want of money.

During the seasons of low water the value of the improvement is shown in a very marked manner, as free and sufficient navigation is then easily maintained over the improved part of the river, while navigation may be entirely suspended below the lowest dam and above the upper pool.

The estimate for the project for the improvement of the Great Kanawha River by the method of locks and movable dams was prepared in 1875, seventeen years ago. As the work is now approaching completion it seemed to be expedient to revise the estimate, which will be found in a special report of the officer in charge in Appendix F F 1. July 1, 1891, balanced unexpended

$414, 531.40 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

206, 631.38 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

207, 900.02 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$4,000.00 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.... 181, 469. 21

185, 469. 21 July 1, 1892, balance available...

22, 430.81 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

225,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

247, 430.81 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 1,080, 700.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1894..

500,000.00 Subinitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F F 1.) 2. Operating and care of locks and dams on Great Kanawha River, West Virginia.—The amount of expenses during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, has been $22,003.96.

(See Appendix F F 2.)

3. Elk River, West Virginia.-The Elk is one of the chief tributaries of the Great Kanawha. Its course is tortuous, but the country through which it flows is rich in minerals and well fitted for agriculture and grazing.

The average low-water width is about 200 feet, with narrows at the rapids of about 150 feet in width and occasional portions of about 300 feet in width. The pools vary in depth from 3 to 10 feet, and are separated by rapids over shoals of cobblestones and gravel, on which there

158, 89

has been at low seasons a depth of but a few inches of water. The average fall per mile in the river from Braxton down is about 24 feet, but is not uniformly distributed, being greatest (about 4 feet per mile) in the central section and less (about 2 feet) in the upper and lower sections. Freshets of small height are of frequent occurrence, but rapidly pass off. The annual rise in the spring is about 10 or 12 feet. An extraordinary rise is sometimes had of 25 to 30 feet, but the duration is not great.

The approved project of improvement has been the removal of rocks, snags, overhanging trees, etc., and the cutting of narrow sluices through the rapids and shoals. The principal interests to be served are those of lumbering and rafting, but much country produce is also carried down stream in small boats, which return with merchandise, etc.

A few days were spent in July, 1891, in removing snags near the mouth of the river; and in September and October the small balance available was expended in blasting a channel for logs through the large, loose rocks in the shoals in the upper river near Webster, in building, repairing, and altering chute walls and dikes, and in removing rocks between Clay and the mouth of the river.

A serious obstruction to the navigation of this river at some stages consists of several milldams. The attention of the proper authorities has been called to these in compliance with the law. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$2, 751,31 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

2, 595.42 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended... Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

2,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

2,658. 89 (See Appendix F F 3.)

4. Gauley Rirer, West Virginia.--Gauley River takes its rise in Webster County, W. Va., its tributaries having their sources in Pocahontas County and Greenbrier County. It is about 115 miles in length, flowing through Nicholas and Fayette counties in a southwesterly direction, sometimes nearly west, and near its mouth almost due south; it is entirely in the State of West Virginia. Its head waters and those of its tributaries are covered with a virgin forest of the finest timber, with only clearings of a few acres here and there; and on the north side of the river, in Webster and Nicholas counties, some glades a few miles wide and in extent 20 or 25 miles, which give only a stunted growth, to break up this vast timber section.

For the first 12 miles from its mouth the Gauley falls only 4 feet per mile; in the next 26 miles its fall is nearly 34 feet per mile, in a gorge similar to that of New River, as seen from the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway between Kanawha Falls and Hinton, the hills on either side being several hundred feet high and almost perpendicular, and the stream full of bowlders of sandstone, some very large, and so numerous as to justify the people in calling this section the “Roughs” of Gauley. From the head of the “Roughs,” near Hominy Creek, 2 miles above Hughes Ferry, to the Forks, about 57 miles, the tall is estimated at 5 feet per mile. The levels from the mouth of Gauley River to the mouth of Meadow River, 29 miles, are taken from Ellet's report on the Great Kanawha River, West Virginia, made in 1858; the remainder are estimated. The levels on Meadow River were obtained from the same source.

Gauley River is 500 feet wide at its moutli, 350 feet wide at mouth of

Meadow River, 200 feet wide at mouth of Cranberry River, 150 feet wide at mouth of Williams River, and 75 feet wide at the Forks.

Operations for the improvement of the Gauley River were instituted after an examination made in 1878 in accordance with the provisions of the river and harbor act of August 5, 1886. It was then pointed out that a valuable improvement of the 12 miles of river from the mouth to the "Roughs” could be made at an expense of $10,000, and that a great advantage would follow the expenditure of $65,000 in the 26-mile reach called the “Roughs" in facilitating and cheapening the bringing to market of millions of feet of lumber of the most valuable and varied kinds.

The approved project has consisted in the removal of ledges and loose rocks and the making of channels through shoals of loose rock and bowlders from the mouth of the river to the “Roughs" to improve the navigation for boats and rafts, and in blasting down the very large bowlders in the "Rough” to permit the more free passage of logs. The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $2,881.04, with decided advantage to the navigation over the worst shoals below the “Roughs.”

The amountexpended in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, has been $2,856.28, with which the channels below the "Roughs" have been improved in width and position, and a good beginning bas been made on the formidable "Roughs" themselves.

In the money statement in the last Annual Report under the head of Gauley River, West Virginia, the following is found, "Amount (esti. mated) required for completion of existing project, $4,000.”

The project under which Congress has given two appropriations contained two heads, namely, the improvement from the mouth of the river to the "Roughs" for bateaux navigation, $10,000, and for the im. provement of the Roughs” and above them, $65,000, total $75,000; see Annual Report for 1888, Part III, Page 1762. The appropriations up to this time have been those of August 11, 1888, September 19, 1890, and July 13, 1892, each $3,000, amounting to $9,000.

Work was first begun on the portion below the “Roughs, of which the cost was estimated to be $10,000, and when $4,000 was stated a year ago to be the balance estimated for completion of existing project, it was understood to refer to that portion of the river. The statement should have read " Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project below the “Roughs," $4,000."

It is proposed by the Kanawha and Michigan Railroad Company to erect a bridge over this river near the mouth; but the plan has not been fully determined upon at the close of the fiscal year. July 1, 1891, balance nnexpended...

$2,938. 96 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

2,856. 28 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

82. 68 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

3,082.68 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 66, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F F 4.)

5. New River, Virginia and West Virginia.—The last appropriation was that of August 5, 1886, of which a balance remains of $2,341.79. In compliance with a recommendation of the local engineer, it was

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