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dangerous by two rocks and a shoal of ledge and gravel in mid-river. The act of September 19, 1890, appropriated $3,500 for completing the improvement.

The project was to mark the rocks by a beacon and the shoal by a spindle, the remainder of the appropriation to be expended in removing bowlders from the channel above Addison Point, the work to be done by hired labor and purchase of materials in open market.

The work was commenced in June, 1891, and completed during the following August. A stone beacon was built on "Channel Rocks and an iron spindle was established on the shoal known as “ Coffins Rocks.” Seventy large bowlders, weighing in the aggregate about 554 tons, besides about 100 smaller ones, were removed from the river above Addison Point. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$3,500.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

3,500.00 (See Appendix A 4.)

5. Narraguagus River, Maine.—The obstruction to navigation consisted in a bar at the mouth of the river, over which there was a navi. gable depth of less than 6 feet at mean low water, and less than 4 feet at extreme low water.

The project for improvement is to dredge a channel not less than 200 feet wide, having 11 feet depth at mean low water, from the deep water of the bay to Long Point, and a depth of 9 feet from thence to the anchorage.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, amounted to $22,341,57.

At the latter date the following work had been accomplished: At the lower steamboat wharf, and at the new steamboat wharf, about 1,800 feet further down stream, the channel had been dredged to a width of about 300 feet. Between these points the channel was about 100 feet wide. From the new steamboat wharf to the deep water of the bay the dredged channel had widths of 90 and 55 feet. All dredging was to the full depth of 11 feet at mean low water.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amounted to $5,121.85, chiefly for liabilities incurred during the previous fiscal year. The contract for dredging which was in progress at the date of the last annual report, was completed July 11, 1891, and no work has been done since, so that practically no work has been in progress during the year just ended. By the dredging done during July, 1891, a least channel width of 90 feet was obtained from the new steamboat wharf to the deep water of the bay. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended ..

$5, 158 43 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5, 121.85 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

36.58 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13,1892

7,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

7, 536.58 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ... 15,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 5.)

0. Breakwater from Mount Desert to Porcupine Island, Maine.—The anchorage in front of the town of Bar Harbor, as well as the wharves at which steamers land, is exposed to storms and seas from southerly directions, at times rendering the anchorage insecure, and the landing of passengers and freight at the wharves difficult.

The original project was to construct a riprap breakwater in a direct line from Porcupine Island to Dry Ledge, and thence to within a short distance of Mount Desert Island. The direction of that portion west of Dry Ledge was afterward slightly changed, so that the westerly end of the breakwater will be somewhat further to the southward.

The expenditures up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, amounted to $19,144.53. Up to the latter date operations had been confined to that part of the work between Porcupine Island and Dry Ledge, and 17,520 tons of stone had been placed in position, or rather more than one-fourth of the entire quantity (66,000 tons) estimated for that portion of the breakwater. The work had not reached a stage to be of much benefit to the harbor.

The expenditures during the last fiscal year were $15,060.84, making the total expenditures under the project $34,205,37. At the date of the last annual report work was in progress, under contract. About the middle of November, 1891, after 19,080 tons of stone had been delivered, the contractor stopped work. Subsequently, in March, 1892, the contract was annulled, on the ground that it had been assigned.

The entire quantity of stone placed in the work is 30,473 tons, which was all deposited in that part between Porcupine Island and Dry Ledge. During June, 1892, new contracts were let for continuing the work, operations to be commenced by July 1, 1892. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended ..

$80, 855. 47 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

15, 060.84 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

65, 794. 63 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$50.00 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 61, 585. 00

61, 635.00 July 1, 1892, balance available.

1, 159. 63 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

50,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

51, 159. 63 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 656, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 6.)

7. Bagaduce River, Maine - When the project for improving this locality was adopted the channel near South Penobscot was crooked and obstructed by ledges of rock, and the least depth at low tide did not exceed 2 feet.

The approved project is to obtain, by dredging and rock excavation, a channel 100 feet wide, and 6 feet deep at low tide, from Bridges Point to Bowden's Wharf, South Penobscot, a distance of about 4,000 feet, the cost being estimated at $45,000. It was also intended to remove a small quantity of rock obstructing the southern channel at Johnsons Narrows, at an estimated cost of $1,875.

The expenditures to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, amounted to $100, which were for preparation of plans, etc. No work had been done. The first appropriation, $3,000, was too small to be judiciously expended. Enough rock excavation to be of any practical benefit could not be accomplished with that amount, and the situation was such that without the removal of rock no practical benefits could be acquired by dredging:

There were no expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, and no work was done.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$6,900.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

6, 900.00 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

11, 900.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 31, 875.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 7.)

8. Penobscot River, Maine.—The improvement of the Penobscot River was first undertaken in 1870, the project being for a channel not less than 150 feet wide, 12 feet deep at low tide, as far up as Bangor. At that time the channel was shoal and dangerous. At Bangor the depth did not exceed about 6 feet at lowest stages, and navigation was obstructed by numerous rocks and ledges. The work was continued until 1880, and included also the removal of obstructions in the harbor at Bangor, and at Bucksport, the expenditures aggregating $198,000. No further work was done until 1884, when a project was adopted for widening the channel at Bangor, and for certain improvements in the river below, near Crosbys Narrows, at an estimated cost of $75,000. While this work was in progress a survey was made, under the river and harbor act of 1886, from Bangor to Bucksport Narrows, and a project was submitted for securing a 22-foot depth between Bucksport and Winterport, at an estimated cost of $365,000, making the combined cost of the two projects $440,000. The act of September 19, 1890, appropriated $25,000, and provided for dredging near Stern's Mill.

Another survey was ordered by the act of September 19, 1890, which has been made, and the report published as House Ex. Doc. No. 37, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix A 25.)

The appropriations up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, aggregated $308,300, and the expenditures under the various proj: ects to the same date amounted to $278,746.02. The results were the widening and deepening of the channel at Bangor from a depth of 6 feet at extreme low tide, to 14 feet, the removal of rocks, ledges, and other obstructions, the removal of a shoal near Bucksport, and a general increase in depth and width of channels from the mouth up to Bangor.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amounted to $5,586.85. The contract for dredging at the shoal above Crosbys Narrows, which was in progress at the close of the fiscal year 1891, was completed in November last, the total quantity of material dredged under the contract being 60,004 cubic yards.

Under the appropriation of September 19, 1890, a contract was made, under date of November 14, 1891, for dredging near Stern's Mill. Work was commenced about the middle of May, 1892, and at the close of the fiscal year about 12,000 cubic yards of material had been excavated. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$29, 553. 98 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5, 586. 85 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

23, 967. 13 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$115.00) July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 22, 500.00

22, 915.00 July 1, 1892, balance available....

1, 032. 13 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13,

40,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

41, 052. 13

1892

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ...... $290,000.00 Submitted in compliance with reqnirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 8.)

9. Belfast Harbor, Maine.--Originally the harbor was not deep enough to accommodate the commerce. At one place in the harbor the depth was only about 4 feet at mean low tide.

In 1876 a project for dredging was adopted, and the work was completed in 1879 at a cost of $22,000. No more work was done until 1890, when a new project was adopted by which it was proposed to dredge a channel 220 feet wide, and 15 feet deep at mean low tide, from the deep water at the entrance to the upper harbor; to dredge an area on the north side of the harbor to a depth of 8 feet; and to dredge an area on the south side of the channel to a depth of 13 feet.

The total expenditures up to June 30, 1891, were $23,588.95. At the latter date a contract was in progress for dredging the area on the northerly side of the harbor to the 8-foot depth proposed, which was the first work undertaken under the new project. At the close of the year 11,007 cubic yards of material had been dredged.

The expenditures during the last fiscal year were $11,411.05, which exhausted the funds. The contract for dredging the 8-foot area, which was in progress at the date of the last Annual Report, was completed October 1, 1891, the total amount dredged being 69,110 cubic yards, scow measurement. This completed the 8-foot dredging contemplated by the project, and leaves the 13-foot and 15-foot dredging yet to be done. July, 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$11, 411. 05 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

11, 411. 05 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 32,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 9.)

10. Camden Harbor, Maine. Before the improvement was commenced vessels drawing more than 6 feet could not reach the wharves at low tide.

The improvement projected is to dredge an area at the eastern part of the entrance to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide; to dredge a channel on each side of the harbor, and the approach to the same, to a depth of 10 feet at mean low tide; to dredge small channels at the upper end of the harbor to a depth of 5 feet at mean low tide; and, after completion of the above items, to dredge the middle ground of the harbor to the same depths as the adjacent channels.

The expenditures up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, on the latest project, amounted to $5,031.17. As a result the western channel had been dredged to a depth of 10 feet at mean low tide throughout its entire length including the approach. The width for a distance of about 1,150 feet from the lower end was 75 feet, and from thence to the upper harbor it was 50 feet.

The expenditures during the last fiscal year were $5,968.83, exhausting the funds. The operations consisted in widening the western channel. The work was done by contract, which was completed September 3, 1891, the quantity dredged being 30,664 cubic yards. By this dredging the approach to the western channel was widened to 125 feet, and the channel itself to 100 feet throughout its entire length.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$5, 968.83 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

5, 968.83 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

12, 000,00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 37,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 10.)

11. Rockport Harbor, Maine.—This is a small harbor, though of considerable commercial importance, on the west side of Penobscot Bay.

Before the improvement was commenced the available depth along the wharves in the upper part of the harbor was but 4 feet at mean low tide.

The project adopted in 1888 provided for dredging the shoal area in the upper harbor to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide, and for removing a small ledge at the eastern side of the area proposed to be dredged to the same depth.

The expenditures up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, amounted to $10,088.81. At the latter date more than two-thirds of the area included in the project had been dredged to the full depth of 12 feet at mean low tide.

The expenditures during the last fiscal year were $4,911.19, exhausting the funds. Work was commenced, under contract, on August 4, 1891, and completed August 18, 1891, by which 15,000 cubic yards of mate rial were dredged and 60 cubic yards of ledge removed. This completed the project. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$4, 911.19 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4, 911. 19 (See Appendix A 11.)

12. Rockland Harbor, Maine.-The location of Rockland Harbor is such that, besides accommodating its own commerce, it affords a convenient refuge for large numbers of coasting vessels. When the project for a breakwater was adopted the harbor was open to easterly storms, the anchorage was unsafe, and the seas often broke over the wharves.

The project as originally adopted in 1881 provided for two breakwaters-one starting from Southwest Ledge in the harbor, and running in a northerly direction toward Jameson Point, a distance of 2,6-10 feet, the other starting from Jameson Point, and extending southward about 1,900 feet. The estimated cost was $550,000. The top of each breakwater was to be only 5 feet above the level of mean low tide.

In 1887 the project was amended so as to bring the top of the breakwater from Jameson Point to the level of high tide, leaving the other as originally designed. The estimated cost was thus increased to 8650,000.

In 1890 the project was again modified. Instead of building the second break water from Southwest Ledge in a northerly direction, on which no work had been done, it was decided to prolong the one from Jameson Point in a southerly direction. By doing so a much larger area of the harbor would secure protection. The estimated cost of the new project was $632,500, this being inclusive of the part already constructed.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, there had been expended on the breakwater the sum of $153,058,51, and about 156,500 tons of stone had been placed in position. The above expen

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