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decided by the Secretary of War not to expend the existing balance at present.

There were no operations or expenditures in the year ending June 30, 1892.

It is proposed by the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad to construct a bridge over the unnavigable portion of this river not far above its junction with the Gauley. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$2, 341. 79 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

2, 311. 79 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project .... 159.000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F F 5.)

IMPROVEMENT OF CERTAIN RIVERS IN KENTUCKY AND WEST VIR

GINIA.

Officer in charge, Maj. D. W. Lockwood, Corps of Engineers, with Lieut. W. L. Sibert, Corps of Engineers, under his immediate orders; Division Engineer, Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers.

1. Tradewater River, Kentucky.--This river was practically closed be. fore the work of improvement commenced by a rock bar near its mouth, and higher up by logs, snags, drift piles, leaning trees, and bars.

The present project, adopted in 1881, provides for clearing the river and its banks of obstructions, and opening up a channel 40 feet wide and 24 feet deep during six months of the year, the improvement to extend 41 miles up-stream from its mouth in the Ohio.

Up to June 30, 1891, $15,481.46 had been expended, resulting in securing a channel through the rock bar near the mouth of the river, and in removing obstructions in the channel and on the banks of the river for a distance of 41 miles, the distance covered by the present project.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, no field work was done, the amount expended, $111.44, being for care of property and inci dentals. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$1,018.51 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

907. 10 (See Appendix G G 1.)

2. Operating and keeping in repair locks and dams on Green and Barren rivers, Kentucky.When the United States acquired possession of these improvements, December 11, 1888, navigation of the system was broken at lock No. 3, Green River, the river wall of that lock having fallen into the river, the lower end of the land wall of No. 1, Barren, was badly cracked and liable to fall at any time, and both walls of No. 2, Green River, were in a dangerous condition. The channel of the river was much obstructed by snags and slides.

Up to June 30, 1891, $344,251.73 had been expended, resulting in the removal of the old river wall at lock No. 3; the construction of a cofferdam inclosing the site of the new wall and in the rebuilding of the wall and reopening the lock to navigation; the taking down and reconstruction of the lower half of the river wall at No. 1, Barren; the rebuilding of dams No. 1, Barren, and No. 3, Green, from the crest to foot of lower slope; the raising of lock walls at No. 1, Green, and in grading and

111.41

paving behind the land wall at No. 1, Barren, and in rear of both walls at No. 1, Green, and the building of seven lock-keepers' houses.

A large number of snags, etc., were removed by the snag boat I'm. Preston Dixon.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1992, $75,686.26 was expended and resulted in general repairs to locks and dams; grading and pav. ing lock grounds; construction of guide and protection cribs; removal of snags, and dredging of lock entrances. Navigation has been practically continuous throughout the year.

The estimate of the cost of operating and care, etc., for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893, is $56,139.

(See Appendix G G 2.)

3. Rough River, Kentucky.--This river is very inch obstructed by overhanging trees on the banks, and by snags, logs, etc., in the bed of the river. The lower 8 miles of the stream are affected by backwater from the Rumsey dam (No. 2), on Green River, but above this the stream has but little depth at low water,

The project for the improvement adopted in 1890 is to clear the river of obstructions, to wit, overhanging trees on the banks, and snags, logs, and stumps in the bed of the river, and to locate and construct á lock and dam near the site of the old ones to carry slackwater to Hartford.

The amount of money expended to June 30, 1891, was $708.54, and resulted in the survey for the site of lock, dam, and lands, preparing plans for the lock, dam, etc., in the construction of a quarter boat for working party, and the deadening of trees and removal of obstructions over 24 miles of the lower river.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $5,123.50, and resulted in deadlening the timber on the banks of the river to Hartford, and clearing the bed of the river of snags, sunken timber, and logs up to the same point. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended ..

$24, 291. 46 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5, 123. 50 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

19, 167.96 Amount appropriated by act as proved July 13, 1892.

15, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

31, 167.96 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 65, 556.05 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix G G 3.)

4. Kentucky River, Kentucky.The condition of the river when the United States assumed charge of its improvements was as follows: The five locks and dams with their approaches, built by the State of Kentucky, were in a dilapidated condition, and the chamel was much obstructed by snags and leaving trees.

The project for the improvement, adopted in 1879, called for the necessary repairs to the five locks and dams and the extension of slackwater navigation for a draft of 6 feet, by the construction of additional locks and dams to Beattyville, a distance of 261 miles from the mouth of the river.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $1,196,183.41 had been expended, resulting in restoring the locks and lams to a nav. igable condition, clearing the channel and banks of obstructions, and the commencement of a lock,

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $147,834.43, and resulted in the building of Lock and Dam No. 6 near Oregon, and the extension of slackwater navigation to High Bridge, a distance of 22 miles; in the removal of the Brooklyn rocks from Pool No. 6, and the completion of a low dam at Beattyville, to give low-water navigation to the mouth of Middle Fork, the nearest point of the Kentucky Union Railroad to Beattyville. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$151, 816.59 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

147, 834. 43 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

3,982. 16 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

2, 128. 03 July 1, 1892, balance available

1,854, 13 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

150,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

151, 851. 13

Amount (estimated) required for completion of oxisting project ...... 1,524, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867, (See Appendix G G 4.) 5. Operating and keeping in repair locks and dams on Kentucky River, Kentucky.The first allotment for this work was for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1885, at which time only four locks could be operated; these required extensive repairs at the time, and the dams and approaches were in a more or less dilapidated condition.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $335,765.89, and resulted in reopening Lock No. 5 to navigation, and placing the other locks and dams in a serviceable condition, the building of guide walls and approaches, the construction of one double and seven single lock houses, and in grading, paving, and draining grounds about the locks. A new dredge boat, of the Osgood pattern, and two dump scows have been constructed, and general repairs made to locks, dams, etc., and in addition the river has been kept clear of snags.

A stone abutment to Dam No. 2 has been constructed and the lock entrances kept clear by dredging:

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $18,999.40, and resulted in general repairs to locks and 'dams, removing snags, and keeping entrances clear by dredging,

The estimate of the cost of operating and care for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1893, is $12,769.52.

(See Appendix G G 5.)

6. Licking River, Kentucky, between Farmers and West Liberty. This stream was originally much obstructed by logs, snags, rocks, and leaning trees, as well as by fish dams constructed by private parties.

The project for the improvement was adopted in 1888, and provides for removing the rocks, snags, and bowlders from the river bed.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $1,468.86, and resulted in the removal from the bed of the river of a large number of rocks, snags, etc., that obstructed both rafting and low-water navigation.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $1,827.23 and resulted in the further improvement of rafting and low-water navigation by removal of obstructions from the bed and banks of the river,

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$2,031. 67 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1,827.23 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

207. 44 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project

11, 680,00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix G G 6.)

7. Big Sandy River, West Virginia and Kentucky.- When the United States commenced improving this stream it and its forks were much obstructed by rocks, bars, snags, and leaning trees. During the lowwater season navigation was practically suspended.

The present project was adopted in 1878, and provided for improving the push-boat and rafting facilities of the river and forks by removing obstructions, etc. This was modified in 1880 to secure slackwater navigation by the construction of a test lock and dam near Louisa, Ky.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $230,265,85, and resulted in improving low-water navigation by the removal of rocks, snags, stumps, and logs from the channel and leaning trees from the banks of the river, and in the construction of a lock complete, near Louisa, together with the abutment for a dam. Also, in the construction of about 80 feet of a permanent dam and the purchase of timber for the completion of same, filling in behind abutment, and deepening approaches to lock.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $13,626.28, and resulted in taking care of Government property, surveys, discharge measurements, and investigations with regard to the construction of a needle dam to take the place of the fixed dam formerly projected, July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$29, 734. 15 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

13, 626. 28 July 1, 1892, balance inexpended

16, 107.87 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

761. 73 July 1, 1892, balance available ....

15, 313. 14 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

50,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

65, 313. 14

| Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 28, 029. 25

Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and | harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix G G 7.)

8. Levisa Fork of Big Sandy River, Kentucky.—This stream was originally much obstructed by rocks, snags, logs, and overhanging trees. Its improvement has been in progress since work on the Big Sandy was commenced under the project for the improvement of that stream.

The present project was adopted in 1890, and provides for the removal of snags, logs, stumps, rocks, etc., from the river and overhanging trees on the banks.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $19,598.24, and resulted in the material improvement of navigation; puslı boats at low water and rafting and light-draft steamboat navigation at moderate stages.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $1,131.90, and resulted in the removal of snags, rocks, logs, and stumps from the river bed. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$1, 151. 76 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1, 131.90 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

19. 86 Amount appropriated by act approvod July 13, 1892

2,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .

2, 519. 86 (See Appendix G G 8.)

9. Tug Fork of Big Sandy River, West Virginia and Kentucky.This stream was originally much obstructed by rocks, snags, logs, and overhanging trees. Its improvement has been in progress since work on the Big Sandy was commenced on the project for the improvement of that stream.

The present project was adopted in 1890, and provides for the removal of snags, logs, stumps, rocks, etc., from the river and overhanging trees on the banks.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $19,328.33, and has resulted in the material improvement of navigation; push boats at low water and rafting and light-draft steamboat navigation at moderate stages.

The improvement has been carried to a point 100 miles above Louisa.

The amount expended to June 30, 1892, was $1,270.33, and resulted in the general improvement of the lower portion of the river. The upper 22 miles, improved, has been very much obstructed in recent years by the construction of the Norfolk and Western Railroad, rocks, stumps, and trees having been blasted and thrown into the stream in preparing the road bed for that road. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$1, 421. 67 June 30, 1892, amount expendeıl during fiscal year

1, 270. 33 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

151. 34 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities,

40,55

July 1, 1892, balance available....
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

110. 79 2,500.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

2, 610. 79 (See Appendix G G 9.)

10. Guyandotte River, West Virginia.—This stream was originally much obstructed by snags, logs, leaning trees, the remains of old dams, and milldams owned by private parties, which required removal.

The project for the improvement was adopted in 1878, and provided for the removal of existing obstructions, natural and artificial, so as to form a channel 30 feet wide, with a least depth of 18 inches, during five months of the year, and extending up the river a distance of 122 miles from the Ohio.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, $15,103 had been expended, resulting in the partial improvement of the river for a distance of 119 miles, removing snags, logs, etc., from the channel, and . cutting passage ways through old dams.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $1,303.30 was expended, and resulted in the general improvement of the stream for rafting purposes from Big lluff Creek to Barboursville.

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