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July 1, 1891, balance unexpended
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

$1,397.00 1, 303. 30

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

93. 70 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

.25 July 1, 1892, balance available....

93. 45 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

2,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

2,093.45 (See Appendix G G 10.)

11. Little Kanawha River, West Virginia.—This river, at the time improvements were commenced by the United States, was much obsti ucted by logs, snags, leaning trees, etc., above that portion controlled by the Little Kanawha Navigation Company,

The original project, adopted in 1876, was for the removal of Beaver and Nailor Bend rocks, and for cleaning our snags and fallen trees. This was modified in 1880 by the adoption of an additional project for the construction of a lock and dam 2 miles above Burning Springs, W. Va.

Up to June 30, 1891, $183,859.71 had been expended, resulting in placing the upper part of the river in a fair rafting condition, and so that during moderate stages light-draft steamboats could run as far as Grantsville. The masonry of the lock was completed, a lock house built, and the abutment and 65 feet of the dam put in. The space behind the land wall of the lock was filled in.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $23,805.89 was expended, and resulted in the completion of the dam, except backing, constructing the gates, and putting them and valves and operating machinery in place.

The area behind the land wall was partly paved, and cribs at upper and lower ends of land wall partially constructed. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$27, 315. 29 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

23, 805. 89 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

3,509.40 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities. July 1, 1892, balance available

2, 523. 35 (See Appendix G G 11.)

12. Operating and keeping in repair the lock and dam on Little Kanawha River, West Virginia.-The lock was open to navigation December 2, 1891, and has been operated continuously, with the exception of a short time in June, when it was closed temporarily for repairs.

The amount expended for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $706.65, in operating the lock and making general repairs to lock and dam, etc.

The estimate of the cost of operating and care for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1893, is $5,220.

(See Appendix G G 12.)

13. Buckhannon River, West Virginia. This stream was originally so obstructed by rocks and log jams that timber could be floated out only on a 12-foot rise.

The project for its improvement, adopted in 1884, provides for the formation of a rafting channel 24 miles long, with a minimum width of 30 feet.

986. 05

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $4,472.60, and resulted in clearing out some of the worst rocks and log jams.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $1,010.18, and resulted in the removal of 3,510 cubic yards of rock, 136 trees, and 25 logs. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1,027.40 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

1,010. 18 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

17, 22 (See Appendix G G 13.)

LAKE HARBORS AND RIVERS.

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBORS ON LAKE SUPERIOR.

Officer in charge, Capt. W. L. Fisk, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers.

1. Harbor at Grand Marais, Minnesota.—This small natural basin was not originally of sufficient depth nor was it adequately sheltered either for commercial purposes or for use as a harbor of refuge; the approved project of 1879 therefore proposed two breakwater piers each 350 feet long from the east and west points of the bay, or one pier 700 feet long from the east point, and the dredging to a depth of at least 16 feet of an anchorage area of about 26 acres at a total estimated cost of $139,669.40. Up to the dose of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, there had been expended on this work $94,461.15; with this sum 350 feet of the east pier had been completed and the 16-foot anchorage area increased to 15.1 acres.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, there was expended $21,455.89, all for dredging, and the 16-foot anchorage area is now 21.5 acres in extent. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.....

$22, 922. 18 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

21, 455. 89 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 466, 29 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year June 30, 1893

11, 466. 29 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project......

12, 319.40 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H H 1.)

2. Harbor at Agate Bay, Minnesota.This is a shipping port for iron ore, and when the breakwater piers are built will form a harbor of refuge. It is 27 miles east of Duluth.

The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1887, and contemplates the erection of two piers projecting from the headlands of the bay and inclosing about 109 acres of water area. The eastern pier is to be 1,000 feet long and the western one 900 feet. Work upon the east pier was commenced in 1887 and at the close of work in November last 750 feet of it had been built.

The beneficial effects of the work done are greater than were anticipated, the tranquillity of the harbor has been greatly augmented, and vessels are no longer obliged to put to sea during storms, but can find safety under the shelter of the breakwater.

Amount expended to June 30, 1891, $36,255.79; amount expended during fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $25,128.80. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$26, 244. 21 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

25, 128. 80

July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

1, 115. 41 30,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

31, 115.41

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ... 151, 708.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H H 2.)

3. Harbor at Duluth, Minnesota.The original project for the improvement of the harbor, adopted in 1871, consisted of a breakwater in Lake Superior, outside of Minnesota Point, in continuation of one already commenced by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. This breakwater was destroyed by a storm in 1872 and abandoned. In 1873 Congress provided for maintaining the canal through Minnesota Point, which had been constructed by the city of Duluth, and for dredging channels in Superior Bay to the Duluth docks.

Work under this project was continued until 1881, at which time the piers of the canal had been repaired and somewhat extended, a harbor basin dredged of moderate capacity, and a narrow channel dredged in Superior Bay from Duluth to deep water at Connor Point. The amount expended under this project was $270,651.81.

The present project was adopted in 1881 and modified in 1884, and 1888, the object being to preserve the piers bordering the canal, dredging an inner harbor to accommodate vessels drawing 16 feet of water, a channel parallel with the Park Point dock line 100 feet wide, a channel east of Rice Point 200 feet wide and 17 feet deep, and a channel along the north shore of St. Louis Bay 200 feet wide, 17 feet deep.

The total amount expended on the harbor to June 30, 1891, is $590,732.98, of which $270,651.81 was expended prior to the adoption of the present project; the amount expended under the present project to the same date is $320,081.17. The work has resulted in increasing the dredged area of the harbor basin to about 104 acres, exclusive of private dredging, removing shoals from area previously dredged, giving the whole dredged basin a minimum depth of 16 feet, deepening the Blast Furnace Channel to a like depth, maintaining the canal piers, and commencement of channels east of Rice Point and on north shore of St. Louis Bay. The Blast Furnace Channel was abandoned upon the establishment of the new dock lines.

Work during the past year consisted in enlarging the new channel on the north side of St. Louis Bay. The season's work gave this channel a width of about 100 feet between 15-foot curves. The amount of material dredged was 295,177.3 cubie yards.

The canal piers are in a poor condition, and the entire work needs to be replaced with an improved and permanent structure.

The harbor basin and connecting channels will eventually require deepening to 22 feet. The channels recently commenced should be completed at an early date, both for the accommodation of commerce and as a matter of economy. The ruling depths in the portions of the harbor dredged by the United States are

Feet. In canal

17 In the inner basin or harbor

16 In channel on north shore of St. Louis Bay for a dist:

uce of about 12,900 feet .. 16 In new channel east of Rice Point..

16

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$62, 833. 73 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

45, 822.98 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

17, 010.75 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$62. 23 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 10, 240.00

10, 302. 23 July 1, 1892, balance available. Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

6, 708.52

125, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

131, 708. 52 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 122, 026.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H H 3.)

4. Harbor at Superior Bay and St. Louis Bay, Wisconsin.—Orig. inally the natural entry to Superior Bay was obstructed with shifting bars having at most but 9 feet depth of water over them. The citizens of Superior attempted to remedy this by constructing piers to confine the outflowing waters of the bay, and this work was taken up by the United States in 1867, and has successfully maintained since then a ruling depth of 16 feet between the piers.

The piers are 350 feet apart, and a good deal of dredging has been necessary to obtain the required depth between them and the channels leading to Connor Point and the Quebec Dock and a new connecting channel in St. Louis Bay. The original project of 1867 has, therefore, been modified from time to time to meet the needs of the rapidly increasing capacity of the vessels visiting this port, the last modification being made by act of Congress approved August 5, 1886, which added improvement of channel in St. Louis Bay.

In carrying out the original project with modifications there had been expended to June 30, 1891, the sum of $182,455,43.

Operations during the past year have consisted in widening and straightening the channel leading from the entry to Connor Point, widening the West Superior Channel in St. Louis Bay in the vicinity of Connor Point and the Northern Pacific Railroad Bridge, and extending it about 2,500 feet towards the natural deep water at Grassy Point.

The entry piers need extensive repairs, particularly the superstructure. The entry and dredged channels have full 16 feet depthi. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$71, 674. 65 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year :

50, 131. 71 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ....

21, 512.94 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

70,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

91, 542.94 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ....

156, 736.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix II H 4.)

5. Minnesota Point at Superior, Wisconsin.-The object of this work is to protect the channel from the old entrance to Superior Bay from drifting sand and to prevent the lake from cutting through Minnesota Point into the bay at a low place known as “The Opening."

The project approved October 23, 1890, was for a double post and board fence of a total length of 1,216 feet filled in with brush and stone to catch the sand.

The fence was completed May 27, 1891, and is accomplishing the purpose for which it was built. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$368.41 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

322. 49 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

45, 92 (See Appendix H I 5.)

6. Harbor at Ashland, Wisconsin.-Ashland Harbor is located at the head of Chequamegon Bay, and originally had no protection from the waves which rolled into the bay or from the waves generated within the bay itself by storms.

The approved project is for the construction of a pile, slab, and rock breakwater, 8,000 feet long, northeast of the town, and for dredging a channel in front of the wharves of the city to accommodate vessels drawing 16 feet of water. During the season of 1889 a portion of the breakwater 4,650 feet in length was completed, but a severe storm in November the same year destroyed the outer 50 feet and the slab filling settled in some places. During last year 1,080 feet was added to the breakwater, making its present length. 5,680 feet, the breach in Chequamegon Point was closed with a brush and stone dike, and the old part of the breakwater repaired.

No dredging has yet been done.
The amount expended during the year was $59,400.87.

The total amount expended under approved project to June 30, 1891, was 77,737.80.

The breakwater, though of insufficient length to give full protection to all the wharves of the city, has nevertheless had a marked influence in improving the tranquillity of the harbor. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$64, 762. 20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

59, 400.87 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

5, 361.33 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

45,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

50, 361.33 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 142,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H II 6.)

7. Harbor at Ontonagon, Michigan.-The entrance to Ontonagon River, which forms the harbor, had but 7 feet depth in 1867, at which time the project for securing 12 feet depth by building parallel piers on either side of the mouth, extending to the 18-foot curve of depth in Lake Superior, and dredging a channel between the piers, was adopted.

The west pier has reached a length of 2,675 feet, and is very nearly out to the 18-foot curve of depth, as proposed. But this curve has advanced in the mean time, owing to the very considerable volume of sand carried into the lake by the river, and since it appears probable that the advance of the bar will keep pace with the extension of the piers, unless a very considerable extension is made at once, a consider

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