Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

ation scarcely to be expected, it does not appear that economic consid. erations would justify any further extension of the piers at present. The east pier is 2,315 feet in length,

For a time it seems that better results will be secured after the piers are put in repair and the superstructures to outer cribs of west pier are finished by dredging across the bar after each spring freshet.

The channel between the piers bas kept a depth of over 12 feet; a dredged channel through the bar and the remaining 150 feet of superstructure on the west pier were completed last season.

At the close of work the channel was left with 16 feet of water in it, but it is presumed the river will at least partially fill this up during this season's freshets.

The amount expended during the fiscal year just closed was $9,585.39.

The total cost of the improvement to June 30, 1891, was $302,730.76. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$11, 042. 31 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

9, 585. 39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ....

1, 456. 92 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

20, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

21, 456.92 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 35, 670.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sectious 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H H 7.)

8. Eagle Harbor, Michigan.-Previous to the improvement of Eagle Harbor the entrance was obstructed by a rocky reef, with 8.1 feet of water over the shoalest part.

The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1866 and modified in 1868, 1874, and 1878. The plan as finally carried out consisted in blasting and dredging through the rocky ledge a channel 130 feet wide and 14 feet deep, and marking it with two guiding cribs, one on each side of the channel, and the removal of a number of bowlders.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $94,713.67, and has resulted in carrying out the above proj. ect, the work having been completed in 1879, and meeting the present demands of commerce.

No appropriation is asked for this harbor, as the funds available will probably be sufficient to keep the work in good order for several years longer. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$2,486. 33 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

200.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended .

2, 286. 33 (See Appendix H H 8.)

9. Harbor at Marquette, Michigan.—Originally this harbor afforded no protection to vessels from easterly or northeasterly storms, and in 1866 a project was approved for the construction of a breakwater composed of cribs filled with rock, and projecting from the shore into the bay a distance of 2,000 feet. This pier was finished practically as projected in 1875, but since its commencement extensive repairs have been made to the superstructure.

As the timber composing the superstructure has been in place far longer than supposed probable, it is essential that it be replaced by more durable material. A project for a concrete superstructure was approved in February, 1890. Its estimated cost is $232,936.71.

In the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, provision was made for the extension of the breakwater. There was finished 60 feet of crib work and 180 feet of riprap foundation. The contract in progress at date of last amual report extended the breakwater 240 feet, leaving 700 feet to be built to complete it.

The breakwater in its present condition gives much protection to the harbor.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $29,798.60.

The total cost of the work to June 30, 1891, was $349,770.58. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$44, 459.42 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

29, 798. 60 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

14, 660.82 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

100.00 July 1, 1892, balance available....

14,560.82 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

80,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

94, 560.82

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 275, 736. 71 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H H 9.)

10. Harbor of refuge at Grand Marais, Michigan.—Originally the entrance to this harbor was obstructed by a bar, having but about 6 feet depth of water upon it. The project for its improvement, adopted in 1881, has for its object a deep and safe channel into the harbor, making it a harbor of refuge. This object is to be attained by building parallel piers projecting into the lake, and dredging out a chamel between them, connecting the deep water of the lake with that of the harbor.

The proposed length of each pier was 1,800 feet. The west pier has now reached a length 1,406 feet, and the east pier 853 feet.

A channel 150 feet wide and 17 feet deep was dredged out between the piers, but had shoaled until it had but from 7 to 9 feet depth, when work begun last season.

The total amount expended under approved project to June 30, 1891, was $180,880.80.

The ainount expended during the year ending June 30, 1892, was $45,727.26.

The outer ends of the canal piers were repaired, new shore ends and spurs put in, the old shore ends remodeled, and a channel 175 feet wide and 17 feet deep dredged through between the piers. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$50, 369. 20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

45, 727.26 July 1, 1892, balance inexpended

4, 641.94 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

19. 20 July 1, 1892, balance available

4, 622. 74 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

30,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

34, 622. 74 Amonnt (estimated) required for completion of existing project.

188, 750.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river

and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix H I 10.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS

OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890. The required preliminary examination of the St. Louis River, Minnesota, from Grassy Point, in St. Louis Bay, to Fond du Lac, or the State line between Minnesota and Wisconsin, was made by the local engineer in charge, Maj. James B. Quinn, Corps of Engineers, and report thereon submitted through Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Northwest Division. It is the opinion of Maj. Quinn, and of the division engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Maj. Quinn was charged with its survey, which has been completed and report thereon submitted by Capt. Fisk. The improvement proposed contemplates forming a channel, by dredging where necessary, 100 feet wide at bottom and 16 feet deep up to Fond du Lac, at an estimated cost of $113,000. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 58, Fifty.second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix H H 11.) IMPROVEMENT OF PORTAGE LAKE AND LAKE SUPERIOR CANALS,

ACROSS KEWEENAW POINT, MICHIGAN, OF HARBORS ON WESTERN SIIORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN NORTH OF CIIICAGO, ILLINOIS, AND OF FOX AND MENOMINEE RIVERS, WISCONSIN.

Officers in charge, Maj. Chas. E. L. B. Davis, Corps of Engineers, to January 20, 1892, and Maj. James F. Gregory, Corps of Engineers, since that date, with Lieut. H. E. Waterman, Corps of Engineers, under their immediate orders; Division Engineer, Col. O. M. Poe, Corps of Engineers.

1. Bortage Lake and Lake Superior Canals, across Kercenair Point, Michigan.-In accordance with the provisions of the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, the United States purchased and assumed the charge and care of these canals on August 3, 1891.

The improvements consist of entrance piers at the harbor entrances on Lake Superior and Keweenaw Bay, canals and canal revetments, dredged cuts and channel-ways, lights and buoys. There are no locks. When the United States assumed charge the piers and revetments were (and are now) in a dilapidated condition, bars had formed at the harbor entrances, and many places in the channel-ways had shoals by deposition of material.

As the water way is intended for the use of all vessels that navigate Lake Superior, and is actually used by a large proportion of them, it is necessary that the depth and width of the channels shall at least be equal to that of the St. Marys Falls Canal, which now limits the maximum craft and dimensions of the largest vessels which run to Lake Superior.

In the act of Congress before referred to, for the purpose of preserving and continuing the use and navigation of said canals, $10,000 " for each of the present and the next fiscal year” was appropriated.

As the United States did not acquire title and assume charge of the canals until August, 1891, the former amount reverted to the Treasury. Therefore only $10,000 has been available to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892. Of this amount $9,833.65 was expended in dredg. ing between and outside of the piers at the Lake Superior entrance last summer and this spring, removing 20,684 cubie yards of material. Soudings and examinations were made all along the water way; a break in the west pier, Lake Superior, was repaired, and the canals cared for and preservel as well as the limited amount of funds avail. able would allow.

llarbor lines in Portage Lake, Houghton County, Michigan.For about 7 miles of Portage Lake, in the vicinity of Houghton and Hancock, harbor lines were recommended by a Board of Engineers and approved by the War Department January 5, 1891. For this purpose and for purposes connected with them, the sum of $5,128.70 was made available by the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890.

Up to the end of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $2,817.78 has been expended in making surveys and examinations and in contingencies connected with the harbor lines.

Portage Lake and Lake Superior Canals, across Keureenaw Point. Amount appropriated by act of September 19, 1890.

$10,000.00 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

9,833. 65 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

166. 35 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

166. 35 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892......

$50,000.00 Amount (estimated, required for completion of existing project...... 1, 245, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

Harbor lines in Portage Lake. Amount appropriated by act of September 19, 1890.

$5, 128. 70 June 30, 1892, amount expended to end of fiscal year

2, 817. 78 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

2, 310. 92 (See Appendix II 1.)

2. Manistique Harbor, Michigan.The natural channel of entrance to the mouth of the Manistique River was 7 feet deep. By private enterprise 3,000 feet of slab piers had been built at the mouth of the river, and a channel dredged to 10 feet before any appropriation had been made by the Government.

The project for the improvement of the harbor was adopted in 1880, and consisted in dredging between the piers built by the Chicago Lumbering Company, increasing the depth of the channel to 12 feet for a width of 150 feet.

By the acts of 1880 and 1881 the sum of $6,000 was appropriated for this harbor in order to dredge a channel between the private piers of the above-mentioned dimensions. Dredging was done to the amount of 11,780 cubic yards at a cost of $2,989.21, and work was then suspended in consequence of the refusal of the company controlling the harbor to rectify their pier lines when rebuilding the same.

Nothing has been done since work was suspended in 1881,

Soundings taken in May, 1892, show a navigable channel between the piers with a depth of 13 feet, but with a governing depth over the bar of about 11 feet. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$2,600. 76 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year,

31. 36 July 1, 1892, balance mexpended

2, 569. 40 (See Appendix 1 I 2.)

3. Cedar River Harbor, Michigan.Previous to improvement the mouth of Cedar River was 175 feet wide and 8 to 10 feet deep, with a 3-foot bar in front.

Improvements had been made by private parties prior to the commencement of Government work.

The project of improvement was adopted in 1883, with a modification

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

in the direction of the piers in 1884, the object being to afford an entrance channel of navigable width and 14 feet in depth.

Up to June 30, 1891, there had been expended $27,781.93, resulting in the construction of two pile piers 754 and 301 feet long, respectively, in continuation of the slab docks built by private enterprise, and a channel that in October, 1885, was 50 feet wide and 13 feet deep, and 100 feet wide for a depth of 11 feet.

Soundings taken in May, 1892, showed a channel 20 feet wide and 12 feet deep; also a channel 10 feet deep with a least width of 40 feet. Dredging by private enterprise was in progress.

Work was suspended in November, 1885, and has not been resumed by the United States since that date. It is reported that some dredging was done by private parties in 1891 and 1892. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$2,218.07 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

76.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

2, 142. 07 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 108,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix II 3.)

4. Menomince Harbor, Michigan and Wisconsin.—Previous to the improvement of this harbor the depth of water at the mouth of the Menominee River was about 4 feet, and the river was navigable for boats of that draft for some 2 miles above its mouth.

The project for the improvement of the harbor was adopted in 1871 and modified in 1874, the object being to afford a channel of entrance of navigable width and not less than 14 feet depth.

The amount expended up to June 30, 1891, was $208,776.54, resulting in the construction of two piers, 400 feet apart, the north pier 1,854 feet long and the south pier 2,710 feet long, with a dredged channel between, 14 feet deep and 200 to 300 feet wide.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, $2,876.73 was expended in dredging, which resulted in the formation of a chamel 3,000 feet long, 200 feet wide, and 16 feet deep, from the 16-foot contour in Green Bay to the lower end of the channel of the Menominee River, of the same depth and width. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$3,255, 05 June 30, 1892, amont expended during fiscal year..

2, 876. 73 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

378. 32 | Amount (estimated) required for repairs to piers...

15,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix I I 4.)

5. Menominee River, Michigan and Wisconsin.--The river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, appropriated $54,000 for "continuing the improvement up the river from termination of old work” and the original approved project was for dredging a channel 200 feet wide and 16 feet deep from Green Bay up the Menominee River as far as the funds available would allow, the object being to create a navigable channel 16 feet deep from Green Bay to N. Ludington Company's mill, a distance of about 2 miles. The project has been moditied by reducing the upper 2,600 linear feet to a widtli of 100 feet.

The total amount expended up to close of fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $11,072.32 in dredging 26,058 cubic yards of material. The

« AnteriorContinuar »