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ditures had resulted in protecting a part of the harbor, giving a secure harbor of refuge for many vessels that trade near this port.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, there has been expended the sum of $16,326.97. This expenditure has added to a small extent to the area of protected harbor. During the year there has been deposited about 23,500 tons of stone in the breakwater, the price paid being 78} cents per ton of 2,000 pounds, the work being done by contract by William S. White, of Rockland, Me. Up to the close of the year there had been deposited in the entire breakwater about 180,000 tons of stone. July 1, 1891, balanee unexpended

$36, 941. 49 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

16, 326.97 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

20,614.52 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$1.907. 10 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.... 18, 178.93

20,086. 03 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

528. 19 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

30,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

30,528.49 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 412,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 12.)

13. Kennebec River, Maine.—Before the improvements were commenced the main channel of the river between the foot of Swan Island and Gardiner, was obstructed by shoals near Beef Rock, with only 10 feet of water at mean low tide, by dangerous sunken ledges in Lovejoy Narrows, by a shoal below South Gardiner with only 8 feet on it at mean low tide, and by a ledge at Nehumkeg Island. The steamboat channel to the west of Swan Island (Hatchs Rock) was obstructed by a shoal over which there was only 7 feet of water, and the channel between Gardiner and Augusta, a distance of 64 miles, was obstructed by shoals which gave only a navigable depth of 3 feet of water in low summer tides,

Appropriations were made at various times between 1827 and 1852, for improving the river, but the first regular project was adopted only in 1866 and was for removing rocks and straightening and deepening the upper part of the river. The estimated cost was $50,000.

In 1868 the project was amended so as to give a wider channel, and the estimate was increased to $80,000. In 1871 the project was extended, the additional cost being estimated at $13,000, making the estimate for the entire project $93,000. It was again extended in 1872 to include the removal of ledges in Lovejoy Narrows at an additional estimated cost of $30,603,61. This project was modified in 1873, and as modified was completed in 1877.

In 1881 a project was adopted for the improvement of the channel west of Swan Island, and near the north end of it. The estimated cost of this project, which was completed in 1883, was $20,500.

The harbor and river act of 1886 provided for a new survey of the river from Bath to Augusta. This survey was made in 1857, and a project submitted for the further improvement of the river, giving 12 feet clear depth at low tide up to the Upper Sand Bar, near South Gardiner, 10 feet from thence to Hinckley Shoal, and 8 feet from thence to Augusta; together with an improvement of the steamboat channel west of Swan Island to 9 feet at mean low tide. The estimated

cost of this project was $ 110,500, which estimate was subsequently increased to $428,500.

The total expenditures on the river up to June 30, 1891, have been $280,381.43. By the expenditure of this sum the channel near Beef Rock has been improved to give a clear depth of over 12 feet, the dangerous rocks in Lovejoy Narrows have been removed to a depth of 12 feet, and the channel through the Narrows straightened, the shoal near South Gardiner was deepened from 8 feet to 10 feet, the ledge at Nehumkeg was removed to 12 feet, the steamboat channel west of Swan Island has been deepened to 9 feet, and near the head of it to 10 feet, the channel between Gardiner and Augusta has been deepened to 7 feet between Gardiner and Hallowell, and to 64 feet between Hallowell and Augusta, and the old piers of the bridge at Hallowell have been removed.

Some shoaling has since taken place between Gardiner and Augusta, and some on the bar below South Gardiner, but on the whole a decided betterment of navigation has been accomplished,

The expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1892, have been $8,411.39, which were applied to the payment of liabilities incurred during the previous fiscal year, and to dredging at Beef Rock, the channel there having filled up. The expenditures of the year ending June 30, 1892, have given a channel not less than 12 feet deep through the bar near Beef Rock, and when the jetty at that place shall have been completed it is expected that this depth will be maintained. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$14, 968.57 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

8, 411.39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

6, 557. 18 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

$314. 89 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 3, 351.07

3, 665.96 July 1, 1892, balance available ....

2, 891. 22 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

100,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

102, 891.22 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project........ 203,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 13.)

14. Harraseeket River, Maine.-The act approved March 3, 1881, provided that a survey be made of this river. The survey was made in July of that year, and a report submitted in December by the engineer of the district.

The river empties into Casco Bay at Stocksbridges Point, about 12 miles northeast of Portland. From Stocksbridges Point up to Westons Point the depth of water is no less than 10 feet at mean low tide, with no obstructions to navigation.

From Westons Point up to Freeport Landing, a distance of 4,500 feet, the depth diminishes so that for the greater part of the distance the bottom of the river is 3.1 feet out of water at mean low tide. The rise and fall of tides here is 9 feet. The project recommended in 1881 was the dredging of a channel not less than 60 feet wide and 3 feet deep at mean low tide, up to Freeport, and a turning basin 180 feet wide at the head of the channel. The estimated cost of the improvement recommended was $13,000.

No appropriation was made for the work, however, and a new survey was ordered in the harbor and river act of 1888. A project for the im.

provement was submitted January 4, 1889. This project was on a somewhat larger scale than the one previously suggested, and contemplated a depth of channel of 5 feet at mean low tide, which would give about 14 feet at high tide. The estimated cost of the project was $36,000.

The following appropriation has been made: September 19, 1890, $10,000. No work had been done up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, as it was not deemed expedient to expend any money on it until sufficient funds had been appropriated to accomplish some good results, which could not be done with the amount of the first appropriation alone.

There were no expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, and no work was done. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$10,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

10,000.00 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

16,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ..

26, 000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ..... 10,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 14.)

15. Portland Harbor, Maine.—The entrance to the main part of the harbor of Portland or the anchorage has always been good, but prior to the improvements made by the Government the approach to the inner harbor was obstructed by a shoal known as the middle ground, over which the depth was only from 8 to 10 feet at mean low tide, while between it and Stamford Ledge the greatest available depth was only 16 feet. Besides, the best part of the wharf front of the city was exposed to the swell from the Atlantic, which sometimes made it dangerous for vessels to lie at the docks, and the depth along this front was in some places as little as 4 feet, making a part of it unavailable for commercial purposes.

The first work of improvement undertaken by the Government was the construction of the breakwater. This was begun as early as 1836. It was completed in 1874.

The project for the improvement of the harbor by deepening its waters was first undertaken by authority of act of Congress of 1868. The project was at that time to excavate a channel 300 feet wide, through the southern slope of the middle ground, to a depth of 20 feet at mean low tide.

In 1870 the project was amended so as to provide for a channel 400 feet wide, and in 1871 it was again amended so as to provide for a width of 500 feet.

In 1872 the improvement of Back Cove was added to the project, and in December of that year the project was further amended by providing for the dredging of the inner harbor up to the harbor commissioner's lines to a depth of 16 feet. By 1876 all the contemplated improvements had been executed except some dredging in the inner harbor.

In 1881 Congress made an appropriation for the further improvement of the harbor, and a project was adopted looking to the entire removal of the shoal known as the middle ground, at an estimated cost of $160,000. The project was completed in 1885.

In 1886 the board of trade of Portland asked for the further improvement of the harbor to a depth of 29 feet at low tide, and in 1887 this

project was adopted, the estimated cost being $135,000. This is the project now in process of execution.

The total amount expended on the harbor up to June 30, 1891, inclusive of all works of improvement, was $505,360.40. These expenditures have resulted in giving, by means of the breakwater, partial protection to vessels lying at the lower wharves, and by means of dredging, an available depth to navigation of 29 feet at mean low tide, a depth sufficient to accommodate the largest class of ocean steamers.

The expenditures during the year ending June 30, 1892, have been, $4,302.44, which expenditures have been applied to the widening of the 29-foot entrance to the inner harbor. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$41, 116. 65 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

4, 302.44 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

36, 814. 21 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$763.09 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.... 33, 856. 74

34,619.83 July 1, 1892, balance available

2, 194.38 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

30,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

32, 194.38 (See Appendix A 15.)

16. Channel in Back Cove, Portland, Maine.-Before any work was done toward improving Back Cove there existed no channel properly considered as such. Only the rudiments of an old channel existed, and for the most part even this was nearly dry at low tide.

The first project adopted had for its object the dredging of a channel 100 feet wide and 8 feet deep at mean low tide from Tukeys Bridge to the stone shed wharves." The estimated cost was $10,000. The project was completed in 1874.

A survey was made in 1886, and a new project adopted having in view the widening of the channel to 300 feet and deepening it to 12 feet at mean low tide, with a turning basin at the upper end. The estimated cost was $180,000. This project is now in process of execution.

The expenditures to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, under the existing project amounted to $51,634.31, and these had given a partially completed channel 12 feet deep at low tide, 4,050 feet long, and about 90 feet wide, with a turning basin 400 feet wide at the upper end.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, were only $57.30, and no work was in progress. A contract, however, was made in 1891 for continuing the work, which contract will be commenced about July 1, 1892.

The increased facilities which this channel gives has enabled heavier vessels to reach this part of the harbor, and the increased tonnage of the year 1891 over 1890 was about 6,000 tons. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$24, 615. 69 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

57. 30 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

24, 558. 39 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts..

22, 500.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

2,058. 39 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

20,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

22, 058. 39

[blocks in formation]

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... $83, 750.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix A 16.)

17. Saco River, Maine.—The first work done on the Saco River was in 1827, when an appropriation was made for the erection of piers, placing beacons or buoys, and removing obstructions. Prior to this the depth of water on the bar was only about ? feet at mean low tide, while much of the river was deeper. The entrance was also dangerous in rough weather, and the numerous projecting rocks and ledges in the river proper, in connection with the swift currents, made its navigation dangerous.

In 1866 a plan was proposed for the improvement of the mouth of the river, and a project adopted in 1867. The project was for the construction of a breakwater at the mouth of the river, the removal of suiken rocks, and the rebuilding of some of the most important piers, against which vessels might drift without damage. The project was completed in 1873 at a cost of $169,275.

Nothing more was done on the Saco until 1883, when a resurvey of the breakwater was made, and a new project submitted for raising and repairing it, and extending it ont to Sharps Ledge. The action of Congress indicates that it desired the old breakwater to be repaired and raised, but not extended.

The hai bor and river act of 1884 directed a survey to be made of the river. This was done in 1885, and a project submitted for the improvement of the river proper, from its mouth to the head of navigation. In 1886 and 1888 appropriations were made for repairing and raising the breakwater, and for improving the river. In 1890 the two proje«ts were combined, so that the one now in process of execution is for improving the Saco River, including the breakwater, and the construction of a proposed jetty opposite the same.

The expenditures up to June 30, 1891, have been $236,104.72. These expenditures have resulted in constructing a breakwater which for a time gave additional depth of water on the bar anil made navigation at the entrance safer, and the construction of piers in the river, which prevented vessels from being swept on the rocks and damaged.

The increased depth required on the bar and in the river can not be expected until the works are further advanced toward completion.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, have been $20,832.50. These have been applied to the construction of the jetty, which has increased the depth somewhat between it and the breakwater, but not on the outer bar. The jetty can be extended fur. ther out with the funds now available, and in order to give immediate relief to commerce it is proposed to dredge a chanuel through the bar while the extension of the jetty is in progiess. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$60, 670, 28 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

20, 832.50 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

39, 837. 78 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$2, 609.48 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 14,544.60

17, 154.08 July 1, 1892, balance available...

22, 683. 70 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

25, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

47, 683. 70

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