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July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....
Amount received for cost of repair of damage to work.
Repayment...

$269, 317.42

173, 95 16. 70

269, 508.07 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

230, 604.08 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

38, 903. 99 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

15. 00 July 1, 1892, balance available ....

38, 888.99 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

300,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

338, 888.99 Amounted (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 146, 223.17 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix N N 4.)

5. Tonavanda Harbor and Niagara River, New York.—The project for this work contemplates a channel 18 feet deep and 400 feet wide from the mouth of the Niagara River at Lake Erie to the north end of Tonawanda Harbor, New York. The work of the year has consisted in excavating 28,764 cubic yards of rock, sand, clay, and gravel from the channel near Strawberry Island, which provides a fair channel 200 feet wide through the reef at this point. The amount expended up to June 30, 1891, was, not including outstanding liabilities, $105,464.75. The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $40,392.86. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$69, 535. 25 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

40, 392. 86 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

29, 142. 39 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

$1, 910.00 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.... 25,000.00

26, 910.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

2, 232. 39 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

75, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

77, 232. 39 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 1,008, 690. 16 Submitted in compliance with the requirements of sections 2 of river

and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix N N 5.)

6. Wilson Harbor, New York.-The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1873 and modified in 1877, the object being to afford a channel of navigable width and 12 feet in depth by the extension of parallel piers from the mouth of Twelve Mile Creek to the 12foot curve in Lake Ontario, with the formation of a protected channel between the piers. The mouth of the creek was originally obstructed by a bar, upon which there was a depth of 1 foot. Before the commencement of operations by the United States the piers had been car. ried about 400 feet into the lake by private enterprise.

The total ainount expended to June 30, 1891, was $64,899.75. The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, was $78.76. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$100.25 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

78. 76 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

21. 49

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... $13, 978. 49 Amount required for repairs to existing works.....

13, 364. 20 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix N N 6.)

7. Olcott Harbor, New York.—The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1866. It proposes to connect the deep water in Lake Ontario with the deep water in Eighteen Mile Creek by the extension of two parallel piers from the mouth of the creek to the 11-foot curve in the lake, with the addition of a dredged channel between the piers. The project was modified in 1874 and in 1881 to provide for the removal of rock found in the channel between the piers and for additional pier extension. The natural channel between the mouth of the creek and the lake was obstructed by a bar, upon which there was a depth of 11 feet. The final project, adopted June 18, 1891, definitely fixes the length of the piers at 850 and 873 feet respectively, and provides for a channel 180 feet wide between piers, decreasing in width to 98 feet at the Main Street Bridge crossing Eighteen Mile Creek, with a depth of 13.5 feet at mean lake level. During the year the work of thoroughly repairing the piers was finished and the channel completed. The total amount expended up to June 30, 1891, not including outstanding liabilities, was $132,703.06. The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $24,800.71. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$30, 296.94 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

24, 800.71 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

5, 496.23 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

17.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

5, 479. 23 (See Appendix N N 7.)

8. Oak Orchard Harbor, New York.—The earliest project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1836, the date of the first appropriation, and proposed the construction of an east and west breakwater approaching to within 200 feet of each other, and connecting at the opening with two parallel piers extending into the lake.

Subsequent modifications were extensions to the original project to provide for removal of rock and to adjust the harbor to the increased demand of commerce. The present project was adopted in 1881, the object being to extend the piers to the 12-foot curve in the lake, with the formation of a channel of navigable width and 12 feet deep at low water between the piers. The natural entrance into Oak Orchard Creek was narrow, with a depth of 2 to 4 feet.

A shore protection 91 feet long was built in 1888 to the east of the east pier. During the past year the channel between the piers was widened and deepened. The total amount expended up to June 30, 1891, not including outstanding liabilities, was $199,514.21. The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, was $1,963.45. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$5, 485. 79 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4,963. 45 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

522.34 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

8. 50 July 1, 1892, balance available

513. 84 (See Appendix N N 8.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS

OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890.

The required preliminary examination of Port Day, above Niagara Falls, New York, was made by the local engineer in charge, Maj. Stickney, and report thereon submitted through Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Northeast Division. It is the opinion of Maj. Stickney, and of the division engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Maj. Stickney was charged with and has completed its survey and submitted report thereon. The improvement proposed contemplates forming a channel 300 feet wide from Tonawanda down to Conners Island, 200 feet wide from Conners Island to Grass Island, and increasing from 200 to 400 feet wide from Grass Island to Port Day; and construction of an embankment, from rock excavated from the channel, extending from Conners Island to Port Day so as to inclose the lower end of the channel. Maj. Stickney recommends that, if the improvement of this part of the river should be undertaken, a channel of 8 feet depth be first provided, which could be enlarged as an increase of commerce might demand. The estimated cost of the work proposed, viz, channel 8 feet deep at mean lake level, is $257,829. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 67, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix N N 9.)

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBORS ON LAKE ONTARIO EAST OF OAK OR

CHARD, NEW YORK.

Officer in charge, Capt. Dan. C. Kingman, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers.

1. Charlotte Harbor, New York.—The original project for the improvement of this harbor, adopted in 1829, proposed to connect the deep water in the Genesee River with the deep water in the lake by parallel piers or jetties about 480 feet apart. The present project, adopted in 1881, is to extend the jetties to the 15-foot curve in the lake, and to form a channel between them of navigable width and 15 feet in depth at low water by dredging. The natural channel was tortuous, and in calm weather would at ordinary stages of the lake, admit ves. sels drawing 8 feet.

The total amount expended from 1828 to June 30, 1892, is $457,919.82. The amount expended from the adoption of the present project in 1881 to June 30, 1892, is $139,841.50.

The total expenditures have resulted in extending the jetties to the 13-foot curve in the lake, and in securing by dredging a channel between them 2,700 feet long, 15 feet deep at extreme low water and 380 feet wide throughout, with the exception of the inner 1,100 feet, where it is 310 feet wide. It has also sufficed for the protection, preservation, and repair of existing works, and for the renewal of the perishable portions from the beginning of the work till the present time.

Though the deep water between the jetties is 15 feet, yet as they have only been extended to the 13-foot curve the full measure of the improvement is not available and can not be until the project is completed.

During the year 83,513 cubic yards of material has been dredged from the channel, and 235 linear feet of the superstructure of the west Jetties has been rebuilt.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....
February 26, 1892, received from vessels for damages to piers.

$34, 699.85

144.90

34, 844. 75 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

23, 291. 35 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

11, 553. 40 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

25,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

36, 553. 40 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 109, 650.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1806 and 1867. (See Appendix 0 0 1.)

2. Pultneyville Harbor, New York.—The project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1870 (the date of the first appropriation), and proposed the construction of a timber breakwater running east

rd from the we shore and then northward as a jetty, into the lake, also an east jetty parallel to and about 200 feet from the west one, and a dredged channel between them. The project was modified in 1875 to provide for increased dredging. The object of the improvement was to provide a channel of navigable width, and not less than 10 feet deep through the bar and into the mouth of Salmon Creek, which was the harbor. The natural channel was not more than 2 feet deep.

In 1884 it was proposed, in order to make the dredging of permanent value and effect, to build a sand-tight structure parallel to the breakwater and about 100 feet from it, between it and the beach, so as to arrest the movement of the beach sand and keep it out of the channel.

The total amount expended to June 30, 1892, is $72,630.77, and has resulted in the extension to the jetties to the 10-foot curve in the lake, and in the construction of about 200 feet of sand-tight bulkhead. A good deal of dredging has been done in the past, before the construction of the bulkhead, but the moving sand has reduced the available depth between the jetties to about seven feet; and along the breakwater and at the mouth of the creek the channel is only three or four feet deep. This renders it impossible for vessels to approach the wharves and warehouses which are within the mouth of the creek, and therefore the harbor is well-nigh useless. The few vessels that do come here are forced to lie at the outer end of the jetty channel in an exposed position, and transfer their cargoes to small boats.

The superstructure of the breakwater and of a greater part of the jetties is now very much decayed. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$1,987. 71 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

1, 618.48 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

369. 23 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

1,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

1, 369. 23

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 9,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix 0 0 2.)

3. Harbor at Great Sodus Bay, New York.—The earliest projects for the improvement of this harbor, adopted in 1828, proposed the construction at the mouth of the bay of breakwaters from the east and

west shores, approaching to within 500 feet of each other, and connected at the opening with parallel jetties extending into the lake. The subsequent modifications were simply extensions of the original project to adjust it to the increased demands of commerce.

The present project was adopted in 1882, the object being to extend the jetties to the 15-foot curve in the lake, and to dredge a channel between them not less than 15 feet deep at extreme low water. The natural entrance into the bay was about 6 feet deep at low water. The natural channel at ordinary stages would admit vessels drawing 8 feet.

The total amount expended from 1829 to June 30, 1892, is $436,089. The amount expended from 1881 to June 30, 1892, is $64,317.26. The total expenditure has resulted in the construction of a timber breakwater 3,851 feet in length, and of two jetties 1,580 feet and 1,294 feet in length, the west one extending to the 15-foot curve in the lake and the east one to the 10-foot curve. It has also served for the protection, preservation, and repair of these works from 1829 to the present time, and for dredging from time to time, amounting in the aggregate to about 260,000 cubic yards, which has served to maintain a channel of navigable width between the jetties which has varied at different times from 8 to 15 feet in depth at low water.

The present available depth does not much exceed 9 feet at extreme low water. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$13, 763. 80 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

12, 226.06 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1,537.74 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

1, 235.00 July 1, 1892, balance available...

302.74 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

15,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

15, 302, 74 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 43,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sectious 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix 0 0 3.)

4. Harbor at Little Sodus Bay, New York.—The first project for the improvement of this harbor was adopted in 1829 and has since been variously modified.

The first appropriation was made in 1852. The first project proposed to partially close the opening between the bay and the lake by lateral dikes connected with two parallel jetties extending into the lake.

The present project, which is simply an expansion of the earlier ones, was adopted in 1881, and is designed to afford a channel of navigable width and not less than 15 feet deep at low water by extending the jetties and dredging between thein. The original entrance into the bay had a depth of about 10 feet at extreme low water.

The total amount expended from the date of the first appropriation in 1852 to June 30, 1892, is $299,199.91.

The amount expended from the adoption of the present project in 1881 to June 30, 1892, is $64,758.14.

The total expenditure has resulted in the construction of 5,989 feet of dikes and jetties, which completes the dike work and extends the jetties to the 12-foot curve in the lake. It has also served for the protection, preservation, and repair of these works from the time they were built to the present time.

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