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ward of Boston, Mass. It contains a well sheltered, entirely unob. structed anchorage of about 110 acres, more than 18 feet deep at mean low water.

The principal city wharves are located on South River, a small stream entering the harbor. This river is 3,000 feet long, from 150 to 300 feet wide, and not navigable at low tide.

The original project for the improvement of this harbor was submitted December 16, 1872. It proposed to dredge a channel of approach to the mouth of South River, 1,730 feet long, 300 feet wide, and 8 feet deep at mean low water. This project was essentially completed in 1873–75.

The present project was submitted December 2, 1889. It proposed to clear out the channel as originally dredged, and to extend it to the head of navigation, gradually reducing its width from 150 feet at the mouth of the river to 100 feet near the inner end of Derby Wharf, and above this to excavate a channel 50 feet wide. To the inner end of Derby Wharf the improved channel to be 8 feet deep at mean low water and above this point, 6 feet deep. The total length of the improved channel to be 5,100 feet approximately.

The total appropriations to date have been $53,000.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $25,073.65. At that date the entrance channel dredged in 1873–75 had preserved essentially its original dimensions.

During the fiscal year 50,213 cubic yards were dredged and 10 cubic yards of ledge removed from the harbor, and at the date of this report the improved channel is 50 feet wide, 8 feet deep at mean low water to near the inner end of Derby Wharf, and thence, to the head of navigation, 6 feet deep at mean low water. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$13, 926. 35 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

12, 708. 97 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

1, 217.38 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

14,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

15, 217.38 (See Appendix B 8.)

9. Lynn Harbor, Massachusetts.—The object of this improvement is to olitain a more direct, wider, and deeper channel of approach to the city wharves. The original channels were narrow and crooked and had but 6 feet depth at mean low water, and the greater part of the harbor was bare at low water.

The project was adopted in 1884. It proposed a channel 200 feet wide and 10 feet deep at mean low water through the outer and inner bars. The outer channel is 3,610 feet long, the inner one 6,450 feet. It is supposed that the inner channel will need occasional dredging. To aid in keeping the outer channel open a training wall is proposed, if experience shall show it to be necessary.

On September 24, 1888, it was proposed to extend the inner channel 400 feet within the harbor line and to excavate at its inner end au anchorage basin 500 by 300 feet in area, 10 feet deep at mean low water, at an estimated cost of $25,000.

The cost of the original project was estimated to be $157,000.

The total expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $75,612.46, of which $66,000 had been expended on the original project.

The condition of the improvement June 30, 1891, was as follows: The outer channel was 3,610 feet long, 200 feet wide, 10 feet deep at age basin.

mean low water; the inner channel was 6,450 feet long, 150 feet wide, 10 feet deep at mean low. water; the anchorage basin was 125 feet wide, 500 feet long, 10 feet deep, comected with the inner channel by a cut 400 feet loug, 100 feet wide, 10 feet deep. Nothing had been done on the trainin? wall.

A contract was in force to dredge 40,000 cubic yards from the anchor

During the year this contract was completed and the interior basin finished as proposed. A survey of the outer improved channel was made, and by comparison with previous surveys it was found that the proposed training wall was not as yet proved to be necessary.

At the date of this report the outer and inner improved channels are in essentially the same condition as on June 30, 1891.

The prospective benefits to commerce are increased facilities and safety to navigation." July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$15, 387.64 June 30, 1892, ainount expended during fiscal year

9, 485. 77 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

5, 901.87 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893......

15, 901. 87 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 81,000.00 Submitted in comnliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B 9.)

10. Winthrop Harbor, Massachusetts.-Winthrop Harbor is situated in the northeastern part of Boston Harbor. It contains 350 acres, approximately, all of which is essentially dry at low tide. The mean range of tides is 9.4 feet.

The original project for its improvement was based on the sirvey provider for in the act of August 5, 1886. It proposed to dredge a straight channel 3,900 feet long, 50 feet wide, 6 feet deep at mean low water, from the “ Back" chanuel of Boston Harbor to Rice's Wharf.

The total appropriations to date for this improvement have been $9,000.

On June 30, 1891, the improved channel was 35 feet wide, 3 feet deep at mean low water, 3,900 feet long.

No operations were in progress during the tiscal year, and at the date of this report the improved channel is in good order. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended........

$3, 618.82 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

3, 116.62 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ....

502. 20 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

3,502. 20 Amount (estimated) re ired for con letion of existing project ..., 8,600.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B 10.)

11. Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.—The object of this improvement is, first, to preserve the harbor by protecting the islands and headlands; and, second, to improve it by widening, straightening, and deepening the channels.

The projects adopted for this purpose since 1866 have been mainly in

accordance with the recommendations of the United States commissioners, whose labors terminated during that year.

The works of preservation consist of sea walls, aprons, jetties, etc., which protect the shores of the islands and headlands, prevent additional wash into the channels, control tidal scour, and preserve the full height of anchorage shelter for vessels in the roadsteads. Such have been built or repaired at Point Allerton, and the islands of Great Brewster, Lovell, Gallop, Long, Deer, Rainstord, George, and Castle.

The works of improvement have been by dredging and blasting, by which means many dangerous rocks and shoals have been removed and the main ship channel enlarged from 100 feet wide and 18 feet deep at mean low water, so that it is now at least 625 feet wide and 23 feet deep at mean low water.

The following tributary channels have also been improved:

a. Charles River.-The natural channel of this river has been widened, straightened, and deepened, so that from its mouth to Western Avenue Bridge, a distance of 43 miles, the channel has a width of 200 feet and a depth of 7 feet at mean low water; thence to Arsenal Street Bridge, 24 miles, the channel has a least width of 80 feet and a least depth of 6 feet.

b. Fort Point Channel.-This important branch of the main ship chaunel had a least depth of 12 feet at its entrance, and the channel was narrow and crooked. It has been widened to 175 feet and deepened to 23 feet at mean low water from its mouth to Congress Street Bridge, a distance of 1,900 feet.

C. Hingham Harbor. (See separate report.)

d. Nantasket Beach Channel. The project adopted in 1880 was to widen and deepen the chamel so that it would be at least 100 feet wide and 9 feet (leep at mean low water. The project was completed in 1881 and 1883.

e." Channel between Nixs Mate and Long Island.—This channel had originally 41 feet depth at mean low water. A cut has been made through the bar 300 feet wide, 15 feet deep at mean low water.

f. Broad Sound. An obstruction called Barrel Rock was removed in 1869.

The total expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $2,147,449.98.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the main ship channel was widened at the west end of Brewster Spit to 625_feet; anıl at the upper middle to 800 feet. It was extended towards Jeffreys Point, so that from Grand Junction Wharf to just east of Simpsou's Patent Dry Docks it is now 275 feet wide, 18 feet deep at mean low water, and thence gradually narrows to 250 feet and shoals to 15 feet to a junction with the same depth off Jeffreys Point.

Repairs were made to the sea wall at Great Brewster Island; the sea wall at Gallops Island was extended 300 feet, and the riprap at Long Island was strengthened.

At the date of this report the several works of preservation are in fair order; the main ship channel is 23 feet deep at mean low water, 1,100 feet wide west of the upper middle, 800 feet wide at the upper middle, 1,000 feet wide at the lower middle, and at least 625 feet wide elsewhere.

The subsidiary channels are in the same condition as at the date of the last report.

Under date of December 23, 1891, the officer in charge submitted a report recommending, for the accommodation of the deep-draft vessels that now seek entrance to this Larbor, that the main ship channel be

deepened to 30 feet at mean low water, at an estimated cost of $1,500,-
000. This report was transmitted to the Senate in response to Sen-
ate resolution of April 18, 1892, and printed in Senate Ex. Doc. No. 83,
Fifty-second Congress, first session.
July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$156, 826. 12 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

68, 901.61 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

87, 924.51 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$5,992. 34 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.. 23, 287.62

29, 279.96 July 1, 1892, balance available

58, 614.55 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

300,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

358, 644. 55 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project .... 50,000.00 Subinitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B 11.)

12. Weymouth River, Massachusetts.—Weymouth (Fore) River empties into the southwestern part of Boston Harbor, Mass. For 4 miles it is navigable at low water for vessels drawing 18 feet, and to the head of navigation, an additional 3 miles, at least 3 feet depth is to be found.

The original project for its improvement was submitted December 2, 1889. It proposed to improve the natural channel, so that 6 feet at mean low water could be carried to the head of navigation in a channel 100 feet wide to near Weymouth Landing, thence to Braintree Bridge 80 feet wide, and above the bridge 50 feet wide; the total length of improved channel to be 7,000 feet and to cost $40,000.

The river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, appropriated for this work $10,000.

The total expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $4,468.46, and at that date the improved channel was 5,000 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 6 feet deep at mean low water.

During the fiscal year 5,585 cubic yards were dredged from the river, and at the date of this report the improved channel is 6 feet deep at mean low water, 40 feet wide to Braintree Bridge, and 25 feet wide thence to the head of navigation. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.....

$3, 531.54 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5,531.54 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 20,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appeudix B 12.)

13. Iingham Harbor, Massachusetts.The object of this improvement is to widen and deepen the natural channel, which was 30 feet wide and 4 feet deep, so that it will be 100 feet wide and 10 feet deep at mean low water.

The project was originally proposed in 1874 and was modified in 1885. The original project was estimated to cost $11,000. The project of 1885 was to cost an additional sum of $18,750.

The total appropriations to date have been $29,000, and the expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $25,088.35.

On June 30, 1891, the improved channel had been completed as pro

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posed, excepting the removal of a midchannel ledge near Chandlers Island.

No operations were in progress during the fiscal year, and at the dato of this report the improved channel is in good order.

The prospective benefits to commerce are increased facilities and safety to navigation. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$911. 65 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

911.65 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

3,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

3, 911. 65 (See Appendix B 13.)

14. Scituate Harbor, Massachusetts.—This harbor is on the west shore of Massachusetts Bay, about 14 miles south of Boston Light.

The object of the improvement is to create a harbor of refuge for vessels bound to Boston from the eastward which are too far south of their true course to clear the dangerous ledges near Minots Ledge Light.

Originally the harbor had a low-water area of about 57 acres, more than 6 acres of which had a depth of at least 3 feet at mean low water. It was entirely open to the action of easterly gales, and its entrance was obstructed by sunken bowlders.

The project adopted in 1880 is to build two breakwaters, one from Cedar Point, on the north side of the entrance, and the other from the First Cliff, on the south side, and to dredge the area inclosed and in front of the entrance. The estimated cost of the improvement is $290,000.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $52,918.73.
The condition of the improvement on June 30, 1891, was as follows:

The north breakwater was essentially completed. Nothing had been done on the south breakwater. The anchorage basin was 350 by 459 feet in area, 7 feet deep at mean low water. The entrance channel was 1,600 feet long, 100 feet wide, 5 feet deep at mean low water. The channel connecting the basin with the town wharves was 2,100 feet long, 25 feet wide, 1 foot deep at mean low water.

During the fiscal year 30,000 cubic yards were dredged from the chaunel connecting the anchorage basin with the town wharves under a contract dated December 5, 1890; and at the date of this report this channel is 3 feet deep at mean low water and 100 feet wide, except at its upper end, where for a distance of 75 feet it is only 50 feet wide.

The anchorage basin, entrance channel, and north and south breakwaters remain in the same condition as on June 30, 1891.

The prospective benefits to commerce by the completion of this improvement are the creation of an additional harbor of refuge on this much frequented dangerous coast. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$10, 761. 23 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

10, 611. 23 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

150.00 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893....

10, 150.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 217,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix B 14.)

ENG 92-4

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