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32. Officers are invited to avail themselves of the advantages of the laboratory, making such arrangements with the officer in charge as shall insure no confusion in his official duties, or in those of the men under his instruction,

33. The instruction of enlisted men will be restricted to a weekly detail of one noncommissioned officer from each company.

34. The battalion quartermaster will submit to this office weekly reports showing the nature of the instruction given, the results attained and the progress made. By order of Lieut. Col. King:

ROBERT MCGREGOR, Second Lieutenant of Engineers, Post Adjutant.

APPENDIX D.-TESTS OF STONE.

REPORTS OF LIEUTENANT A. M. D'ARMIT, corps OF ENGINEERS.

1.

WILLETS POINT, N. Y., January 16, 1892. Sir: In compliance with your request I have the honor to submit the following report of the tests of two specimens of sandstone forwarded by Capt. Fiebeger, Corps of Engineers, for the purpose:

The specimens were cubes, 2 inches on the edge, and very accurately cut. The bed of the stone was not marked, however, and this is a serious oversight in preparing stones for testing. By mere chance I managed to get the cubes properly placed in the inachine, and they were broken, as they should be, “on bed." Sketches of the fractures are not given, as the stones broke into small fragments with a loud explosion when the breaking stress was reached.

In structure and general appearance when crushed this sandstone compares very favorably with the best specimens that I have tested. For definite and reliable results, however, not less than four samples from a given quarry should be tested, and they should be carefully sawed into cubes, as the blows of a hammer are decidedly injurious to small specimens. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. D'ARMIT,

Second Lieutenant of Engineers. Col. W. R. KING.

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WILLETS Point, N. Y., May 16, 1892. COLONEL: In compliance with the request contained in the inclosed letter, I have the honor to submit herewith the results of tests made in the usual manner. The tabulated results explain themselves, and seem to call for no comment. The crushing surfaces were pasteboard. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. D'ARMIT,

Second Lieutenant of Engineers. Col. W. R. KING.

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Davis' Quarry, first Gray, slightly green, Bed...
ledge, middle.

rather coarse.
Davis' Quarry, second Lighter and consider. .. do ...
ledge, middle.

ably finer texture.
Davis' Quarry, third Whiter, no green, ..do(?).
ledge, top.

slightly coarser

than B.
Davis' Quarry, third Greenish, a little finer ..do ...
ledge, middle

than A.
Davis'Qnarry, bottom. Coarse, gray, stratifi- .. do(?).

cation irregular.
Wright's Quarry, from Smooth, even, light, .. do ...

bowlders in front of rather fine texture.
ledge.
..do

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Plymouth Quarry, top Whitish, rather coarse ..do
of hili, down-stream free grains of quartz.
ledge.
do.

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..do Elk Quarry, quarrier Slaty, greasy, fast, .do

ti ne texture, very

homogeneous.
Superior freestone, Very smooth and even .. do ...

Rowan County, Ky.

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APPENDIX E.-TESTS OF WIRE ROPE.

REPORT OF LIEUTENANT A. M. D’ARMIT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS.

WILLETS Point, February 10, 1892. COLONEL: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit here. with the following report of the tests of wire rope made by me to-day:

The rope was of galvanized steel wire of the ordinary form of cross-section adopted for the mooring rope in our torpedo system. Three samples, 3 feet in length eaclı, were prepared, although but two were tested. These broke at 26,000 and 25,000 pounds, respectively, the breaking in each case being just over the top of the thimble, where the outer strand parted. I am inclined to think the breaking was due to the excess of stress brought on these strands by the sharp curvature of the thimble. This view is further supported by the fact that between marks on the rope 14 inches apart the yielding was less than one-sixteenth of an inch, showing that the rope as a whole had been strained to nothing like its elastic limit. The holding of the new form of shackle was particularly satisfactory, and had two of these been obtainable the rope would doubtless have showed a very high breaking strength. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. D'ARMIT,

Second Lieutenant of Engineers. Lieut. Col. W. R. KING,

Corps of Engineers. MEMORANDUM.—The same piece of rope was afterwards, February 19, 1892, fitted with another of the new shackles and stood a pull of 33,000 pounds, or about twice the breaking strength of the ordinary iron mooring rope of the same size.

W. R. K.

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RIVERS AND HARBORS, ETC.

APPENDIX A.

IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS AND HARBORS IN MAINE AND NEW HAMP

SHIRE,

REPORT OF LIEUTENANT-COLONEL PETER C. HAINS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OFFICER IN CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1892, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS.

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UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,

Portland, Me., July 1, 1892. GENERAL: I have the honor to forward herewith my annual report for the fiscal year 1892, on harbor and river works in my charge. Very respecfully, your obedient servant,

PETER C. HAINS,

Lieut. Col., Corps of Engineers. Brig. Gen. THOMAS L. CASEY,

Chief of Engineers, U. S. A.

A I.

IMPROVEMENT OF ST. CROIX RIVER, MAINE. The river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, provided for an examination and survey of the St. Croix River, the reports on which were published in Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1890 (page 463.)

When the survey was made the available depth over the shoals at mean low water was from 6.5 to 9.5 feet, and at the upper steamboat wharf at Calais it was but 1.5 feet. The channel was also narrow.

The improvement proposed was a channel 12 feet deep at mean low water, and generally 200 feet wide (but narrowed to 150 and 100 feet in the upper part of the harbor to avoid ledge) up to the upper steamboat wharf, immediately below the bridge, which marks the head of navigation. Such improvement would enable steamboats to land at the upper wharf at all stages of the tide, and would also permit the larger vessels engaged in the lumber trade to receive their full cargoes at the

arves, instead of dropping down the river nearly 4 miles after being partially loaded, and completing their cargoes from material rafted down to them. The object was to be accomplished by dredging and by the construction of a small jetty and training wall. The work proposed extends over about 4 miles of the river. The difference between high and low tides is about 20 feet. The estimated cost of the improvement was $280,000.

An examination of the river was made in 1867 by the officer in charge of the district, and subsequently, that is, between 1866 and 1874, appropriations were made for the improvement amounting to $35,000 in the aggregate, but each appropriation provided that the Dominion Government of Canada should expend an equal amount on the improvement. In 1873 the Dominion Goverument of Canada appropriated $25,000 for improving the river, that being the amount that had been appropriated up to that time by the United States. A conference was held by the engineer of the district with an agent of the Dominion Government, and a plan of improvement was agreed upon. The obstructions consisted of slabs, sawdust, and other mill waste; but before allowing the expenditure of the money appropriated by the Government of Canada, the minister of public works required that some guaranty should be given that the further deposit of this refuse in the river should be discontinued. As there did not seem to be any law at the time in existence by which the deposit could be prevented, the money that had been appropriated was not expended on that improvement, but in 1870 Congress authorized the appropriation made for the St. Croix to be expended on the Lubec Channel, which was done.

The act approved September 19, 1890, appropriated $35,000 again for the improvement of the St. Croix, “but upon condition that the Gov. ernment of the Dominion of Canada shall expend a like sum in the improvement of said river.". On account of the proviso contained in the act no expenditures have been made, and no work has been done under the appropriation of September 19, 1890, pending action by the Dominion Government.

Money statement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.

$35,000.00 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

35,000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 245,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

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