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The expenditures during the last fiscal year were $5,968.83, exhausting the funds. The operations consisted in widening the western channel. The work was done by contract, which was completed September 3, 1891, the quantity dredged being 30,664 cubic yards, scow measurement. By this dredging the approach to the western channel was widened to a width of 125 feet and the channel itself to a width of 100 feet throughout its entire length.

Camden is the collection district of Belfast. The nearest light-house is on Negro Island, at entrance to harbor.

Money statement.

Jnly 1, 1891; balance unexpended

$5, 968.83 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

5, 968.83 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

12,000.00 ( Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.. 37,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1894 37,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

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Number of vessels arriving and departing during calendar year 1891 (estimated).

Sailing vessels..
Steamers

324 1, 180

Total...

1, 504

A II.

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT ROCKPORT, MAINE. Rockport Harbor is a small harbor, though of considerable commercial importance, on the west side of Penobscot Bay.

Before the improvement was commenced the available depth along the wharves in the upper part of the harbor was but 4 feet at mean low tide.

The project, adopted in 1888, provided for dredging the shoal area in the upper harbor to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide, and for removing a small ledge at the eastern side of the area proposed to be dredged, to the same depth. The estimated cost of the work was $14,000.

The mean range of tides is 9. 8 feet.

5,000

The following appropriations have been made: By act of August 11, 1888..

$10,000 By act of September 19, 1890.

The expenditures up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, amounted to $10,088.81. At the latter date more than two-thirds of the area included in the project had been dredged to the full depth of 12 feet at mean low tide.

The expenditures during the past fiscal year were $1,911.19, exhausting the funds. Work was commenced under contract on August 4, 1891, and completed August 18, 1891, by which 15,000 cubic yards of material, scow measurement, were dredged, and 60 cubic yards of ledge removed. This completed the project.

Rockport is in the collection district of Belfast. The nearest light-house is on Indian Island at entrance to harbor.

Money statement.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

$4, 911.19 4, 911. 19

A 12.

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT ROCKLAND, MAINE.

The location of Rockland Harbor is such that, besides accommodating its own commerce, it affords a convenient refuge for large numbers of coasting vessels. When the project for a breakwater was adopted the harbor was open to easterly storms, the anchorage was unsafe, and the seas often broke over the wharves.

The following appropriations have been made for the improvement of Rockland Harbor: Act of June 14, 1880

$20,000 Act of August 2, 1882

40,000 Act of July 5, 1884.

40,000 Act of August 5, 1886

22, 500 Act of Angust 11, 1888.

30, 000 Act of September 19, 1890.

37, 500

190,000 The project as originally adopted in 1881 provided for two breakwaters, one starting from Southwest Ledge, in the harbor, and running in a northerly direction toward Jameson Point, a distance of 2,640 feet, the other starting from Jameson Point, and extending southward about 1,900 feet. The estimated cost was $550,000. The top of each breakwater was to be only 5 feet above the level of mean low tide.

In 1887 the project was amended so as to bring the top of the breakwater from Jameson Point to the level of high tide, leaving the other as originally designed. The estimated cost was thus increased to $650,000.

In 1890 the project was again modified. Instead of building the second breakwater from Southwest Ledge in a northerly direction, on which no work had been done, it was decided to prolong the one from Jameson Point in a southerly direction. By doing so a “much larger area of the harbor would secure protection. The estimated cost of the new project was $632,500, this being inclusive of the cost of the part already constructed.

Up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, there had been expended on the breakwater the sum of $153,058.51, and about 156,500 tons of stone had been placed in position. The above expenditurés had resulted in protecting a part of the harbor, giving a secure harbor of refuge for many vessels that trade near this port.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, there has been expended the sum of $16,326.97. This expenditure has added to a small extent to the area of protected harbor. During the year there has been deposited about 23,500 tons of stone in the breakwater, the price paid being 784 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds, the work being done by contract by William S. White, of Rockland, Me. Up to the close of the year there had been deposited in the entire breakwater about 180,000 tons of stone.

Money statement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$36, 941. 19 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

16, 326.97 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

20,614.52 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

1, 907. 10 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts. 18, 178.93

20, 086.03 July 1, 1892, balance available...

528.49 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

30,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

30, 528. 49 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.... 412, 500,00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30,1894 100, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

Receipts and shipments.

1890.

1891.

Tons.

Bricks, cement, and sand..
Coal
Fish, oysters, and salt
Grain and flour.
General merchandise and miscellaneous
Ice
Lumber
Lime
Stone..
Wood and cooperage.

Tons.

3, 709 31, 205 2, 366 5,084 64, 318

5, 500 23, 234 150,000 54. 200 71, 950

3,897 33, 505 2, 569 6, 147 67, 579

4, 672 24, 376 160,000 54,778 76, 237

411, 566

433, 760

Number of vessels arriring in calendar year 1891. Steamers from 400 tons to 1,200 tons each...

342 Steamers from 75 tons to 200 tons each..

886 Sailing vossels, foreign, average about 90 tons each

664 Sailing vessels, coast wise trasle.

2, 300 Sailing vessels, for refuge only

2,300 Total....

6, 492 Three new steamboat lines were established during the year from Rockland to Isles. boro, to Vinalhaven, and to Port Clyde, Me.

A 13

IMPROVEMENT OF KENNEBEC RIVER, MAINE.

Congress recognized the importance of improving the Kennebec River as early as 1827, when an appropriation was first made. Appropriations aggregating $18,500 were made between 1827 and 1852. From 1852 to 1860 no work was done by the General Government, but the citizens of Augusta within this period undertook to dredge out a channel above Sheppard's Point, and they improved it in some localities, but the material was not removed a sufficient distance from the channel, and from that and other causes it filled up again.

The act of June 23, 1866, appropriated $20,000 for the improvement of the upper part of the river, between Sheppard's Point and Augusta, a length of about 3 miles. The project for this improvement consisted in removing rocks and straightening and deepening the channel, which was obstructed by several shoals, to a depth of 8 feet up to Hallowell and 7 feet from thence to Augusta. Thé estimated cost was $50,000. The projected width of channel was fixed at first at 75 feet.

In 1868, after a survey of the river had been made from Augusta to Gardiner, the project was amended so as to include all that part of the river from Gardiner to Augusta, and the width fixed at 100 feet. The amended project was estimated to cost $80,000. In 1871 the project was again extended by act of Congress, which appropriated $5,000 for improving the river between Gardiner and Richmond. This part of the river it was proposed to improve so as to give 10 feet at low tide up to Gardiner. This necessitated the removal of a ledge near Nehumkeg Island, of ledges and bowlders at other points, the dredging of a channel through the Upper Sands Bar and one near the head of Swan Island. The estimated cost of this additional project was about $13,000.

By July 1, 1872, all the work contemplated in the various projects for improving the Kennebec from Richmond up to Gardiner had been completed. There were, however, several rocks in the main channel of the river at Lovejoy Narrows, on the east side of Swan Island, which were a source of danger to shipping. One of them, known as “ Halftide Rock” had been excavated to a depth of 8 feet at low tide, but as this gave only about 13 to 14 feet at high tide it was not sufficient to accommodate commerce. In the Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1872 the removal of some of these rocks to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide was suggested, at an estimated cost of $13,500. A survey of two of the ledges was made in 1872, when it was found they were larger than was expected, so that the estimate was increased to $30,603,61. A more accurate survey was made in 1874, and other small sunken ledges were found. In that year the adopted project consisted in removing Ledges III, IV, V, and Dry Rock, all to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide. Ledge I (Half-tide Rock) had been completed to 12 feet in November, 1873, and Ledge II was omitted from the project, as the removal of Dry Rock seemed to render the removal of Ledge II unnecessary.

In 1877 all the dangerous rocks in Lovejoy Narrows had been removed to a depth of 12 feet at mean low tide, which completed all projected improvements in the Kennebec River.

No further work was done on the river until 1880, when a survey was made in obedience to the requirement of the harbor and river act of June 14, 1880, of Richmond Harbor, at the head of Swan Island, with a view to its improvement. The project suggested for this improvement, which was adopted in 1881, was to give a navigable channel not less

ENG 92-33

than 10 feet deep at mean low water on the shoals at the upper end of Swan Island and at Hatchs Rock, about 2 miles below, and 11 feet at the lower end of Swan Island, about 5 miles below the town of Richmond.

The estimated cost of the project was $20,500. This project was completed in 1883.

In the harbor and river act of 1886 a new survey of the Kennebec River was ordered at Bath, and from Augusta to the lower end of Perkins Island. This survey was made in 1887, and a new project for the improvement of the river from Bath to Augusta was submitted. The project submitted consists in removing the shoals at Beef Rock, at Hatchs Rock, and near South Gardiner by means of wing dams and training walls, and dredging, the removal of rocks at Bath and at Lovejoy Narrows by blasting, and the dredging of a channel through the shoals between Augusta and Gardiner, and the removal of the old piers of the bridge at Hallowell. The depths were to be as follows: At Beef Rock Shoal 12 feet, at Hatchs Rock 9 feet, at Lovejoy Narrows 18 feet, at Upper Sands Bar 12 feet, at Hallowell Shoal 10 feet, and from thence to Augusta, 8 feet-all at low tide.

The estimated cost of the entire project was $410,500. In 1888, an appropriation of $75,000 having been made for the improvement of the Kennebec River, a project for the expenditure of the appropriation in improving Hatchs Rock and Beef Rock Shoals was approved. Subsequently owing to dredging which had to be done, and which was not contemplated in the original project, the estimated cost of the entire improvement was increased to $128,500. All of the appropriation made by act of September 19, 1890, was also expended on Beef Rock and Hatchs Rock Shoals and the removal of the piers of the old bridge at Hallowell.

The following appropriations have been made: March 2, 1827.. $4, 000 June 10, 1872

$8,000 March 19, 1828 3,500 March 3, 1873

12, 000 April 23, 1830. 5,000 June 23, 1874

12,000 Angust 30, 18.12. 6,000 March 3, 1875

15, 000 Jue 23, 1866.

20,000
March 3, 1881

10,000 March 2, 1867

30, 000
August 11, 1888.

75,000 April 10, 1869. 14, 850 September 19, 1890.

50,000 July 11, 1870

15, 000 March 3, 1871

15, 000
Total

295, 350 The total expenditures on the river up to June 30, 1891, were $280,381.43. The results accomplished may be stated thus:

Before the improvements were commenced the main channel between the foot of Swan Island and Gardiner (15 miles) was obstructed by a shoal at the foot of Swan Island with only 10 feet on it at mean low tide, by dangerous ledges in Lovejoy Narrows, by a shoal below South Gardiner with only 8 feet of water on it at mean low tide, and by a ledge in the channel at Nehumkeg Island. This part of the river has been improved by dredging, contraction works, and removal of ledge, so as to give a good channel 12 feet deep at mean low tide as far up as Gardiner, except over the shoal below South Gardiner. A channel was dreilged through this shoal to a depth of 10 feet at mean low tide, but gradual filling has since reduced this depth to 9 feet.

The steamboat channel to the westward of Swan Island has been improved by dredging and contraction works so as to give a depth of 9 feet at mean low tide. The former depth over the shoals was but 74 feet.

The channel between Gardiner and Augusta (6.4 miles) was obstructed by shoals with a depth of water on them of only 33 feet at low summer tide. This depth was increased by dredging to 7 feet between Gardi

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