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To complete the improvement will require an appropriation of $6,800, all of which could be expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.

Manchester Harbor is in the collection district of Gloucester, Mass., of which Gloucester is the port of entry. The nearest light-house is situated upon Bakers Island, 2 miles from Proctors Point.

The existing commerce is nominal and the commercial statistics are included in Gloucester Harbor.

No increase in the tonnage of the harbor is apparent, and no new lines of water transportation have been established.

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Salem Harbor, Massachusetts, is 12 miles to the northward of Boston, Mass. Fort Pickering Light marks its entrance, between Winter Island on the west and Naugus Head on the east. The harbor is 1,750 feet wide at its entrance and 5,500 feet long between the 12-foot contours of opposite shores. It contains a well-sheltered, entirely unobstructed anchorage of about 110 acres, of a greater depth than 18 feet, mean low water. In front of the city are extensive flats, which make long wharves necessary to reach deep water. The principal wharves of the city are located on “South River,” a small stream which formerly drained a tidal basin on the southwestern side of the city. This basin is now practically filled up by city improvements. The river is 3,000 feet long to the head of navigation at South or Lafayette Street Bridge. It is crossed by a highway bridge about one-fourth of a mile below the head of navigation, with a draw opening 31feet wide. The width of the river varies from 300 feet at its mouth to 150 feet at the head of navigation. The greatest depth of continuous low-water channel is 0,8 feet.

The original project for the improvement of the harbor was submitted December 16, 1872. It was proposed to dredge a channel 1,730 feet long, 300 feet wide, 8 feet deep at mean low water, at an estimated cost of $32,000. This project was essentially completed, 1873–75.

The present project for the improvement of the harbor was submitted December 2, 1889. It was based on a survey provided for in the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888. It proposed as follows:

To clean out the chamel of approach to South River to the original dimensions as dredged in 1873–75, viz: 300 feet wide at the entrance, and 150 feet wide off Derby Wharf Light, 8 feet deep at mean low water; to extend this channel with same depth, gradually reducing its width to 100 feet, to near the inner end of Derby Wharf, and from this point to the head of navigation excavate a channel 50 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water.

The total length of the channel to be improved will be, approximately, 5,100 feet, and its excavation will require the removal of 85,000 cubic yards of material, at an estimated cost of $28,000.

To date the total appropriations for this harbor have been $39,000.

The expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $25,073.65. At that date the project of 1872 had been completed and a contract was in force withi Mr. Augustus R. Wright to dredge 50,000 cubic yards in accordance with the project of 1889.

Operations under this contract were commenced in July and satisfactorily completed in November, 1891. Fifty thousand two hundred and thirteen cubic yards were removed.

A small ledge near Derby Wharf Light was uncovered by the dredging, and was removed under an agreement with Mr. Hiram W. Phillips at a cost of $315.

At the date of this report the improved channel is 50 feet wide, 8 feet deep at mean low water, to near the inner end of Derby Wharf, and thence to the head of navigation 6 feet deep at mean low water.

To complete the present project would require an appropriation of $14,000, all of which could be expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.

Salem Harbor, including South River, Massachusetts, is in the collection district of Salem, Mass., of which Salem is the port of entry. The nearest light-house is Derby Wharf Light, Salem Harbor, Massachusetts.

The accompanying commercial statistics for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, have been furnished by the collector of customs at Salem, Mass.

The dates and amounts of appropriations for this work are as follows: Act of March 3, 1873

$15, 000 June 23, 1874.

10,000 September 19, 1890

14,000

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Amount of revenue collected, 1868, $29,687.14; 1891, $6,416.80; 1892, $3,611.62.

Shipping.

1863.

1891.

1892.

Tons.

Entrances :

Foreign

Domestic Clearances :

Foreign Domestic

Vo. 100/1 5985

Tone. No.

117 225, 000

21, 659

Tone 15, 168 456, 824

No.
77
10

10, 720 2, 356

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75 39

11,123 5, 933

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IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS. Lynn Harbor is situated 9 miles northeast from Boston. It is 1 by 2 miles, approximately, in extent, the greater part of which is dry at low water.

It is protected on the north and west by the mainland, and on the east by Nahant Beach, and its entrance, 2 miles wide, into Massachusetts Bay, is on the south side.

A plan of the harbor, showing the projected improvement was published in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1884, Part

1, page 532.

Before improvement, three narrow and crooked channels of approach to the wharves existed, in each of which there was about 6 feet depth at mean low water. The mean rise or fall of the tide is 9.3 feet.

The western channel leads to the Point of Pines and the mouth of Saugus River.

The main ship channel is entered between White and Lobster Rocks, and connects about 3,600 feet northward with the Black Rock Channel, which is the most eastern, near Nahant Beach.

The project for improvement was adopted in 1884. It provides for the excavation of a channel 200 feet wide and 10 feet deep at mean low water, from a point near and east of the White Rocks, to deep water opposite Little Nalant, a distance of 3,610 feet. This is called the outer improved channel, and is merely a rectification and deepening of the main ship channel. The combined main ship channel and Black Rock Channel are sufficient for the purpose of commerce for the next 2,500 feet. Then commences the inner improved channel, which is projected 6,450 feet long, 200 feet wide, and 10 feet deep at mean low water. It extends from deep water, opposite Sand Point, to the harbor commissioners' line, and follows very closely in direction the extension of the united main ship and Black Rock Channels.

On September 24, 1888, this project was modified. It was then proposed to extend the main ship channel 400 feet within the harbor line and to excavate at its inner end a basin 500 by 300 feet in area, 10 feet deep at mean low water.

It is supposed that the inner channel will need to be dredged occasionally to maintain its width and depth, but a training wall about 6,000 feet long, has been proposed to aid in keeping the outer channel open, if experience shall show it to be necessary. This wall is to start from the shore at “Little Nahant," and is to cross the Black Rock Channel. Its outer position is to be parallel to the outer improved channel.

The cost of the original project was estimated to be $145,000. This

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estimate was revised in 1885, and then made $157,000, to provide for an increased amount of dredging found to be necessary during the progress of the work, to round off the junctions of the natural channel with the dredged channel, to provide flatter slopes to the sides of the cuts than was originally designed, and also to provide funds for necessary surveys during the progress of the work.

The modifications proposed September 24, 1888, were estimated to cost $25,000, which would make the total cost of the improvement $182,000.

The total appropriations for this harbor to date have been $91,000. The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $75,612.46.

On June 30, 1891, the outer channel had been completed as proposed3,610 feet long, 200 feet wide, 10 feet deep at mean low water; the inner channel was 6,450 feet long, 10 feet deep at mean low water, 150 feet wide, or 50 feet less than is proposed. The basin was 125 feet wide, 500 feet long, 10 feet deep at mean low water, connected with the main ship channel at the harbor line by a cut 100 feet wide, 400 feet long, 10 feet deep at mean low water, and a contract was in force with the New England Dredging Company to excavate 40,000 cubic yards at 18 cents per yard from the basin.

Operations under this contract were commenced in September, 1891, and satisfactorily finished in October, 1891. The basin was completed as proposed 500 feet long, 300 feet wide, 10 feet deep, at mean low water; connected with the inner channel by a cut 200 feet wide, 10 feet deep at mean low water.

During the year a survey of the outer improved channel was made, and by comparison with previous surveys it was shown that no change had occurred in the channel or its approaches since it had been dredged, and therefore the proposed training wall is not as yet necessary.

At the date of this report the improvement is in good order.

To complete the improvement will require au appropriation of $91,000, and of this amount $50,000 could be expended to advantage during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.

Lynn is a port of entry in the collection district of Marblehead, Mass. The nearest light-house is Egg Rock (Nahaut) Light, 3 miles distant.

The accompanying commercial statistics for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, have been furnished by the collector of customs at Marblehead, Mass.

The date and amount of appropriations for this work are as follows: Act of August 2, 1882

$60,000 August 5, 1886

6, 000 Angust 11, 1888

10, 000 September 19, 1890

15, 000 Total

91, 000 Money statement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$15, 337.61 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

9,187.77 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...

5,901.87 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

15, 901.87 Ainount (estimateel) required for the completion of existing project 81,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expertheri in tiscal yearening June 30,1894 50,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

Amount of revenne collected 1890, $3,509.60; 1891, $4,855.96; 1892, $3,545.17.

Shipping.

1890.

1891.

1892.

Yo.

Entrances :

Foreign

Domestic Clearances :

No. Tons.

28 2, 692 489 97, 800

No. Tons.

18 1. 878 453 95, 130

Tons.

2, 760 150,000

734

Foreign
Domestic

1
38 4, 735
477 95, 400

21 2, 702
447 93, 870

31 736

3,790 146, 000

Imported.

1890.

1891.

1892.

Coal
Iron
Lumber
Miscellaneous

Tons.
146, 000

1, 400
16, 496
16, 246

Tons.
147,000

750
12,380
22. 786

Tons.
148, 577

1, 447 *10, 326.000

25,000

* Feet.

All classes of vessels frequent the harbor. Number of vessels boarded during the year, 743; average draft, 13 feet; average tonnage, 230.

Bio.

IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT WINTHROP, MASSACHUSETTS.

This harbor is situated in the northeastern part of Boston Harbor, immediately westward of Winthrop Head.

A chart of the harbor was published in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for the year 1888, part 1, page 470.

The harbor contains, approximately, 350 acres, all of which is dry at low tide except a short, narrow, crooked slough east of Snake Island. To the town wharf no low-water channel exists. The mean range of tides is 9.4 feet.

The nearest deep-water channel of Boston Harbor is known as the 6 Back” Channel, and it extends from Point Shirley to East Boston. It has from 9 to 16 feet depth at low tide. The town wharf is distant 3,900 feet from this “Back" Channel.

The original project for the improvement of this harbor was submitted November 28, 1887; it was based on the survey provided for in the river and harbor act of August 5, 1886.

The project proposes to excavate a straight channel 3,900 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 6 feet deep at mean low water from the "Back" Chan. nel to Rices Wharf, at an estimated cost of $17,600.

For this improvement the following amounts have been appropriated: By act of August 11, 1888

$1,000 September 19, 1890

5,000 Total ....

6,000 The amount expended to June 30, 1891, was $5,326, and at that date the improved channel was 3 feet deep at mean low water, 3,900 feet long, and 35 feet wide. Opposite Rices Wharf it was 50 feet wide.

No operations were in progress during the fiscal year, and at the date

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