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The entrances and departures of vessels from this waterway are estimated as follows:

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Nantucket Harbor is the only one between the harbors of Marthas · Vineyard (Vineyard Haven and Edgartown) and Provincetown, a distance of about 100 miles, except the small harbor of Hyannis, on the other (the north) side of Nantucket Sound. The navigation of this sound is intricate and dangerous by reason of numerous shoals. Nantucket Harbor has deep water inside, and the object of the improvement is to make it a harbor of refuge for vessels plying between ports north and south of Cape Cod, estimated to be 30,000 annually. In the memorial to Congress, on which the first appropriation for this harbor of refuge was based, it was stated that more than 500 vessels had been wrecked in the vicinity of the island. (For map of harbor see page 423, Annual Report of 1880, and page 576 of Report of 1885.)

The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 3 feet.

ORIGINAL CONDITION.

Before the commencement of the present work there was a shoal about 1} miles in width outside the entrance, through which shoal the channel or line of best water was only about 6 feet deep and very crooked and subject to changes in location.

PLAN OF THE WORKS.

The present approved project of 1880 as modified in 1885, is to construct jetties of riprap stone projecting from either side of the present entrance to the harbor, for the purpose of concentrating the strength of the tidal currents and excavating a channel of 15 feet depth by scour, and at the places where the full depth required will not be reached by this means to complete the work by dredging, at a total cost, as estimated in 1885, of $375,000 (see page 434, Annual Report 1880, and pages 575, 576 of 1885). A plan of the works may be found in the Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1885, Part I, page 578.

APPROPRIATIONS.

Upon the present project appropriations have been made as follows: 1880, $50,000; 1881, $25,000; 1882, $25,000; 1884, $10,000; 1886, $15,000; 1888, $20,000; 1890, $25,000. Totals up to June 30, 1891, $170,000.

AMOUNT EXPENDED AND RESULTS TO JUNE 30, 1891. The total amount expended on the present project (including $2,613.22 outstanding liabilities) up to June 30, 1891, was $155,385; and the result was the construction of the west jetty to a point 3,955 feet from the shore, and the east jetty to a distance of 834 feet from its initial point on shore, which is the outer end of the middle of the three northwest spurs built on Coatue Beach some years ago, and the foundation was laid and the jetty partially completed for an additional distance of 191 feet. The channel was deepened by scour to 73 feet. Nearly half the needed work had beeu done.

OPERATIONS DURING THE LAST FISCAL YEAR.

Value of United States plant, $6,500. Including $113,42 of ontstanding liabilities, the expenses of the year were $14,615.

At the beginning of the last fiscal year the work of constructing the east jetty had just been resumed.

During the year 7,146 tons of stone were put in the work, by which a length of about 1,300 feet of the east jetty was built up to the half tide level. This work was done by hired labor and barges and towboats owned and hired by the Government. The stone put in the east jetty was carried to Nantucket Harbor in barges, from whence it had to be lightered over the Coatue Flats; this having been mostly done in the lighters belonging to the Government, which from their light draft were well adapted to this kind of work. The work was discontinued on the 14th of August to await further appropriations.

A light has been maintained on the west jetty during the year except during the last two weeks of June, when, from the exhaustion of the appropriation, it was discontinued.

This work was in the local charge of Mr. C. W. Sherman as superin tendent.

WORK REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THE EXISTING PROJECT,

The work required to complete the existing project is the extension of the east jetty, the raising of the west jetty in some places, and the excavation by dredging of so much of the channel as may not be excavated by tidal scour.

OPERATIONS CONTEMPLATED FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30, 1893. The work has been much delayed heretofore by the scour around the end of the jetty, making it necessary to build it in 15 feet of water instead of in 5. According to the present plan it is proposed to build up a considerable length of the jetty to the half-tide level before completing it to the full cross section. The channel appears to be moving continually to the eastward and deepening slightly from year to year.

It is proposed to apply the balance on hand and the funds asked for to the further construction of the east jetty and raising low places in the west jetty, together with a little dredging, if necessary.

Nantucket is in the Nantucket collection district and is a port of entry. There was no revenue collected in the last calendar year. The value of the harbor is mainly as a harbor of refuge. The nearest light-houses are Nantucket Cliff und Brant Point lights. The nearest fortitication is the fort at Clark Point, New Bedford, Mass.

Money statement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$17, 228. 22 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

17, 114.80 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

113.42 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities.

113.42 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

25,000.00 Amoant (estimated) required for completion of existing project.. 180,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal yearending June 30, 1894 100,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS,

The commerce arriving and leaving Nantucket Harbor, Massachusetts, by water, during calendar year ending December 31, 1891, is estimated as follows (based mainly upon reports received from Mr. Joseph W. Clapp, collector of customs, Nantucket, Mass.):

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Gain over last year, none known.
Transportation lines established during the year, none.
The vessels using this waterway are estimated as follows:

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Steam

Freight and passenger
Fishing

Pleasure boats
Sail

Freight, large
Schooners.
Sloops...
Pleasure, large
Pleasure boats, small.

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7 20 14

C 3.

IMPROVEMENT OF MARTHAS VINEYARD INNER HARBOR AT EDGAR

TOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. The inner harbor at Edgartown lies in the northern part of the waterway or strait that separates Chappaquiddick Island from the east end of Marthas Vineyard. It extends southward about 1} miles from Chappaquiddick Point opposite Edgartown, and averages about one-fifth of a inile in width.

This harbor is so completely landlocked as to form a safe harbor of refuge for small vessels, but the contracted width of the entrance and the resulting velocity of the tidal currents make it difficult to pass through. (For map of this harbor see House Ex. Doc. No. 59, of Fiftyfirst Congress, first session.)

ORIGINAL CONDITION.

The anchorage of this harbor was in 1889 obstructed by a MiddleGround shoal, carrying only about 6 feet depth of water at low tide.

PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT.

The present approved project of 1889- is to excavate the Middle Ground to a depth of 10 feet at mean low water, at a total cost, as estimated in 1889, of $4,500. (For details see page 588, Annual Report of 1890.)

APPROPRIATIONS.

Under the present project appropriations have been made as follows: 1890, $2,000; total up to June 30, 1891, $2,000.

AMOUNT EXPENDED AND RESULTS TO JUNE 30, 1891.

The total amount expended on the present project (including $232.75 outstanding liabilities) up to June 30, 1891, was $246, in preparations for active work in the field.

OPERATIONS DURING THE LAST FISCAL YEAR.

Value of United States plant, $0.00. Including $11.39 of outstanding liabilities, the expenses of the year were $1,699.40.

At the beginning of the last fiscal year no work was in progress. On July 16 the United States dredge Texas borrowed from a neighboring work, two scows, and a hired tug were transferred from Hyannis to Edgartown, and the work of dredging was commenced on the Middle Ground in the inner harbor and continued until August 5, when it was discontinued, to await further appropriations, the plant being transferred to other work. Fifteen thousand three hundred and eightyfive cubic yards of sand were excavatel, completing the dredging over about one-half of the middle-ground.”

This work was in the local charge of Mr. C. O. Abell, as superintendent.

WORK REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THE EXISTING PROJECT.

The work required to complete the existing project is the excavation of the remaining half of the Middle Ground to a depth of 10 feet at mean low water.

OPERATIONS CONTEMPLATED FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30, 1893.

It is proposed to apply the balance on hand to the completion of the project.

Edgartown is in the Edgartown collection district and is a port of entry. The amount of revenue collected there during the last calendar year was $460.10; the nearest light-house is the Edgartown Light; the nearest fortification is the fort at Clark Point, New Bedford, Mass.

$1, 986.75
1, 920.76

65.99
11.39

Money statement.
July 1, 1891, balance unexpended.
June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.
July 1, 1892, balance unexpended
July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities
July 1, 1892, balance available.
Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.
Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

54.60 2,500.00

2,554, 60

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

The commerce arriving and leaving Edgartown Harbor, Massachusetts, by water, during the calendar year ending December 31, 1891, is estimated as follows (based mainly upon reports received from Mr. C. H. Marchant, Edgartown, Mass.):

Tonnage.

Exports. Imports. Total.

Class of goods.

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Gain over last year, none known.
Transportation lines established during the year, none reported.

No one seemed able to furnish any reliable information as to the number of vessels entering, leaving, or using this harbor.

C 4.

IMPROVEMENT OF VINEYARD HAVEN HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS.

Vineyard Haven is a deep indentation in the northern shore of the island of Marthas Vineyard, on the southern side of Vineyard Sound. It is triangular in form and faces the northeast. The width of the mouth of the harbor, or the distance between the points of land on the east and west sides of the entrance known as East Chop and West Chop, is about 14 miles, and from a line connecting the chops to the narrow southerly end of the harbor, at which is situated the town of Vineyard Haven, the distance is about 13 miles. The entire area of the harbor between the shore lines is about 949 acres, of which some 657 acres have a depth of not less than 15 feet. The mean rise and fall of the tide is 1.7 feet.

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