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COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

The commerce arriving and leaving Pawcatuck River by water during the calendar year ending December 31, 1891, is estimated as follows) based, mainly upon reports received from Messrs. Maxson & Co., Westerly, R. I.):

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Gain over last year: None.
Transportation lines established during the year: None reported.

The entrances and departures of vessels from this waterway are estimated as fol-
lows:
Steam:
Passengers, mainly.

400 Tugs

600 Sail, freight

285

C 18.

HARBOR OF REFUGE AT STONINGTON, CONNECTICUT. Stonington Harbor lies on the north side of the eastern entrance from the ocean into Long Island Sound, and the main object of the improvement is to furnish a harbor of refuge for vessels entering and leaving this entrance to the sound. The mean rise and fall of the tide is about 23 feet.

ORIGINAL CONDITION.

Originally it was an open bay, unprotected from southerly storms, and obstructed by a shoal, having a low water depth of but 6 feet at the shoalest part. This shoal nearly filled the inner harbor, and left but a narrow channel on either side of a depth insufficient to permit vessels of 12 feet draft to reach the upper wharves at low water.

Between 1827 and 1831, about $37,000 was spent in constructing piers or small breakwaters in the inner harbor for the protection of the harborage. (See page 326, Part I, Annual Report of 1879.)

Between 1871 and 1873, $46,166 was appropriated for a survey of the harbor and for dredging the harbor to 12 feet depth. This work was finished in 1875. (See page 246, Part II, Annual Report of 1874.)

Between 1875 and 1879, $112,500 was appropriated for the construction of a western breakwater, running southeast 2,000 feet from Wampaset Point to 18 feet depth of water, and for dredging to 12 feet depth inside of this breakwater. (See pages 243, 244, 245, Part II, Annual Report of 1875.) This work was completed in 1880.

PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT.

The present approved project of 1880, as modified in 1882, provides the construction of an eastern breakwater to extend from the vicinity of Bartletts Reef to the Middle Ground, at a total cost, as estimated in

1882, of $143,000. (See page 583, Part I, Annual Report of 1880, and page 598, Part I, 1882.)

The position of the western end of the eastern breakwater has not been determined, but it will probably be found necessary, in order to afford all the protection desired, to extend the breakwater at least until it intersects a range from Stonington Light to the middle of Wicopessit Island. It may then be found desirable to carry it still farther, possibly to the range from Stonington Light to the eastern end of Fisher Island.

A plat of this harbor, showing the position of the breakwaters, was published in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1882, Part I, page 598, and 1884, Part I, page 632.

APPROPRIATIONS.

Upon the present project appropriations have been made as follows: 1880, $25,000; 1881, $30,000; 1882, $25,000; 1884, $10,000; 1886, $20,000; 1888, $8,000; 1890, $12,500. Total up to June 30, 1891, $130,500.

AMOUNT EXPENDED AND RESULTS TO JUNE 30, 1891. The total amount expended on the present project (including $2,710.20 outstanding liabilities) up to June 30, 1891, was $130,010, by which the eastern breakwater was built to a length of about 2,377 feet.

OPERATIONS DURING THE LAST FISCAL YEAR.

Value of United States plant, $1,300. Including $30.46 outstanding liabilities, the expenses of the year were $481.88.

At the beginning of the last fiscal year the work of constructing the eastern breakwater was in progress. This work was discontinued on September 1, after 447 tons of stone had been put in the work to strengthen the end of the work as left earlier in the season.

The stone used was from Masons Island quarry and was transported to the work in vessels hired by the Government.

This work was in the local charge of Mr. F. I. Angell as superintendent.

WORK REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THE EXISTING PROJECT. The work required to complete the existing project is to finish the construction of the eastern breakwater. In case it be found that suffi. cient protection to the harbor of refuge has been afforded when the range from Stonington Light to the middle of Wicopessit Island is reached, the length of the breakwater yet to be built is about 193 feet. Should it be decided to extend it to the middle ground it will require about 100 feet more.

The completion of this work will afford a thoroughly protected an. chorage for vessels drawing 18 feet of water and a harbor of refuge for the commerce which daily passes between Long Island Sound and the eastward.

OPERATIONS CONTEMPLATED FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE

30, 1893.

If an appropriation is made it is proposed to extend the eastern breakwater farther to the westward.

Stonington Harbor is in the Stonington collection district and is a port of entry. The amount of revenue collected at Stonington in the last calendar year was $1,215.98.

The principal value of the harbor is as a harbor of refuge. The nearest lights are Stonington Light and Latimer Reef Light. The nearest fortification is Fort Trumbull, New London Harbor, Connecticut.

Money statement. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$3,200.20 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

3, 161.62 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

38. 58 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

30.46 July 1, 1892, balance available

8. 12 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

12,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

12, 508. 12

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

The commerce arriving and leaving Stonington Harbor, Connecticut, by water during the calendar year ending December 31, 1891, is estimated as follows (based mainly upon the reports received from Mr. Charles T. Stanton, collector of customs, Stonington, Conn., and Mr. Richard Deming, Providence and stonington Steamship Company, New York, N. Y.):

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Gain over last year, unknown.
Transportation lines established during the year, none reported.
The entrance and departures of vessels from this waterway are estimated as follows:

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SAIL.

Freight
Fishing boats
Pleasure boats, small

2,000
1,000
2,000

10
6
21

150
30

C 19..

REMOVING SUNKEN VESSELS OR CRAFT OBSTRUCTING OR ENDANGER

ING NAVIGATION.

WRECK OF WEYBOSSET.

From the wreck of the schooner Weybosset removed in 1891 from near the bell buoy on Pollock Rip Shoal the following property was recov. ered. This property was sold at auction at Hyannis, Mass., on July

15, 1891, and the proceeds, $120, were turned into the Treasury in accordance with the provisions of the river and harbor act of 14 June, 1880: 1 anchor (about 2,500 pounds), 1 anchor (about 300 pounds), 1 chain (about 135 fathoms), 1 lot of junk, 1 windlass, 1 capstan, and 1 lot of paving blocks (10,000 to 11,000.)

WRECK OF LUCY JONES.

The schooner Lucy Jones was in the month of February, 1892, reported as having sunk in 12 fathoms depth of water in location approximately three-eighths of a mile northwest of Cross Rip Light-Ship in Nantucket Sound, by collision with steamer City of Savannah. The vessel was at that time loaded with brimstone and her measurements were approximately as follows: length, 100 feet; breadth, 23 feet; depth, 7 feet; gross tonnage, 122.87 tons.

Under authority of the War Department, dated February 11, 1892, the masts, spars, and rigging of this wreck were immediately removed to a depth of 50 feet below mean low water, at a total cost of $125. No property worth selling was recovered from the wreck. This work was all done during the months of February and March, by the Davis Coast-Wrecking Corporation, of New Bedford, Mass., as contractors, and under Mr. W. B. Poland as inspector.

WRECK OF ALLIE OAKES.

The schooner Allie Oakes was in the month of August, 1891, reported as having sunk in about 15 feet depth of water in location approximately 2,000 feet north of the eastern end of Hyannis Breakwater through having sprung a leak.

The vessel was at that time loaded with lime, and her measurements were approximately as follows: Length, 197 feet; breadth, 23.3 feet; depth, 7 feet; gross tonnage, 127.1 tons.

Under the provisions of section 4 of the river and harbor act of June 14, 1880, the wreck was duly advertised and contract entered into for its removal (see attached abstract of proposal) by Mr. Charles W. Johnston, of Lewes, Del., as contractor; and under Mr. G. F. Rostock, as inspector, work was commenced November 9, 1891, and completed November 17, 1891.

No property was recovered from th Teck.

Abstract of proposals for removing wreck of schooner Allie Oakes, receired at Engineer

Office, U. S. Army, Newport, R. I., in response to advertisement dated September 26, 1891, and opened at 12 o'clock noon on Monday, October 26, 1891.

No.

Amount of bid.

Name and address of bidder.

1 2 3 4 5

Charles W. Johnston. Lewes, Del.
Enoch Townsend, Somers Point, N.J
Wm. E. Chapman, New York, N. Y
Geo. W. Townsend, Boston, Mass
Hiram W. Phillips, Quinoy Point, Mass

$935 1, 645 1, 800 2, 094 3,000

Contract awarded to Charles W. Johnston.

WRECK OF ANDREW J. YORK,

The schooner Andrew J. York was in the month of September, 1891, reported as having sunk in about 64 fathoms depth of water in location approximately 74 miles NW. I N. from Nantucket Light through haring collided with steamer Indian.

The vessel was at that time loaded with paving stone, and her measurements were approximately as follows: Length, 114.3 feet; breadth, 30 feet; depth, 9.4 feet; gross tonnage, 228.63 tons.

Under the provisions of section 4 of the river and harbor act of June 14, 1880, the wreck was duly advertised and contract entered into for its removal (see attached abstract of proposal) by Mr. Enoch Townsend, of Somers Point, N. J., as contractor; and under Mr. A. R. Elliot and Mr. E. G. Bradbury, as inspectors, work was commenced December 12, 1891, and completed January 29, 1892.

No property was recovered from the wreck. Abstract of proposals for removing wreck of schooner Andrew J. York, receired at En

gineer Ofice, U. S. Army, Newport, R. I., in response to advertisement dated October 2, 1891, and opened at 12 o'clock noon on Monday, November 2, 1891.

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Contract awarded to Enoch Townsend, Somers Point, N. J.

WRECK OF MARY E. OLIVER. The schooner Mary E. Oliver was in the month of October, 1891, reported as having sunk in about 22 feet depth of water in location approximately one-eighth of a mile west of Norris' wharf, in Vineyard Haven Harbor, Mass., through having sprung a leak in a gale.

The vessel was at that time loaded with feldspar, and her measurements were approximately as follows: Length, 87.3 feet; breadth, 26.2 feet; depth, 7.7 feet; gross tonnage, 147.84 tons.

Under the provisions of section 4 of the river and harbor act of 14 June, 1880, the wreck was duly advertised and contract entered into for its removal (see attached abstract of proposal) by Mr. George W. Oliver, of Portland, Me., as contractor; and under Mr. Theodore Topham, as inspector, work was commenced February 5, 1892, and completed April 20, 1892.

The following property, recovered from the wreck, was sold at auction at Vineyard Haven, Mass., on May 18, 1892, and the proceeds, $304.75, were turned into the Treasury in accordance with the provisions of the special act and section above quoted : 181 tons feldspar, 100 pounds old iron, 100 pounds old rope, 2 scoop shovels, 3 square pointed shovels, 4 double blocks, 4 single blocks, and 1 iron maul. Abstract of proposals for removing wreck of schooner Mary E. Oliver, received at En

gineer Office, U. S. Army, Newport, R. I., in response to advertisement dated November 6, 1891, and opened at 12 o'clock noon on Tuesday, December 8, 1891.

No.

Name and address of bidder.

Amount of bid.

1 2 .3

5 6 7 8 9

George W. Oliver, Portland, Me.
Enoch Townsend, Somers Point, N.J
Boston Towboat Company, Boston, Mass.
Wm. Buckley, Vineyard Haven, Mass
Geo. W. Townsend, Boston, Mass.
Alfred Sorensen, Somerville. Mass
Davis Coast Wrecking Corporation, New Bedford, Mass
Wm. E. Chapman, New York, N. Y
Chas. W. Johnston, Lewes, Del .....

$2, 235
2, 735
2, 745
2, 900
2, 900
2, 977
3, 470
4,000
4,900

Contract awarded to George W. Oliver,

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