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PROJECTS. FOR IMPROVEMENT.

The river and harbor act of June 4, 1880, provided for a survey of the river, which was made that year; the report, dated October 30, 1880, and printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1881, Part I, page 674, contained estimates for a plan of improvement as follows: The estimate to secure a depth of 6 feet: at mean low water by dredging in the river, and from its mouth to the 6-foot curve in the bay is..

$21, 000 For diking, from river to 6-foot curve in bay

15, 800 Engineering, contingencies, etc., 15 per cent..

5,520 Total......

42, 320 One dike was to be on the west side of the river's mouth, and another and shorter one on the east side; the total length of the two to be about 2,400 feet, to be of carbolized timber filled with riprap, and to be from 5 to 7 feet wide from out to out.

Nothing had been done towards the desired improvement, and in 1886 another examination (ordered by the river and harbor act of that year) was made.

The report on this examination is printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1887, Part I, page 759. This report contained a project and estimates for dredging a channel 60 feet wide and 6 feet deep from the highway bridge at Patchogue (4,000 feet above the mouth of the river) to the 6-foot contour in Great South Bay, total length of about a mile, and to protect the channel in the bay by a dike or a jetty on its west side 1,700 feet long; the plan also mentioned the possible necessity of a dike on the east side, but it was not included in the estimates, which were as follows: Dredging from the head of navigation at the bridge to the 6-foot contour in the Great Sonth Bay, the channel being 60 feet wide and 6 feet deep, would require the removal, by scow measurement, of about 60,000 cubic yards of sand, at 30 cents per cubie yard

$18,000 Diking 1,700 linear feet, at $10 per linear foot.

17,000 Superintendence, contingencies, etc...

5,000 Total....

40,000 Beginning of the work under this project was approved by the Secretary of War October 4, 1890, after Congress had made the first appropriation for the improvement, and up to July 1, 1891, 450 tons of stone had been placed, building 150 linear feet of the jetty, and partly completing 900 feet additional.

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OPERATIONS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1892.

At the beginning of the year work on the jetty was in progress, under a contract with E. Bailey & Sons, of Patchogue, N. Y., to furnish and place riprap at the rate of $2.80 per gross ton. During the fiscal year 2,552 tons of riprap were delivered and placed in the jetty, completing 900 linear feet of the work, which had been begun during the preceding year. The contract was completed October 9, 1891, 3,002 tons of stone having been delivered and 1,340 linear feet of jetty completed.

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers an agreement was made with Alonzo E. Smith to deepen the channel by dredging at the rate of 20 cents per cubic yard, prism measurement.

Work under this agreement was begun September 11, 1891, and up to the time of completion, January 16, 1892, 16,265 cubic yards of mud

and sand were dredged and placed behind the jetty, making the channel 50 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water extending from deep water in Great South Bay, shoreward and parallel with the jetty; the dredged channel was made about 1,850 feet long, and extends about 350 feet beyond the shore end of the jetty and into the mouth of the river.

PRESENT CONDITION OF IMPROVEMENT.

The jetty is in good condition; it is 1,340 feet long, 3 feet wide on top, and stands about 1 foot above mean high water; its outer end is in 4 feet depth of water.

The dredged channel has filled considerably, owing to the subsidence of the very soft banks.

The available depth of the river above the dredged channel is about 2 feet at mean low water.

PROPOSED OPERATIONS.

Future appropriations should be applied to completing the dredged channel, and to extending the jetty, as contemplated by the project.

The only appropriation for Patchogue River is the one of $15,000, made in 1890.

Patchogue River is in the collection district of New York. The nearest lighthouse is at Fire Island Inlet, 14 miles southwest. The nearest work of defense is Fort Hale, New Haven Harbor, Connecticut, about 35 miles in a direct line northward.

Money statement.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$14, 843. 82 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

13,584.83 July 1, 1892, balance inexpended

1, 258.99 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

77.37 July 1, 1892, balance available ...

1, 181.62 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

8,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

9, 181.62 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 17,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal yearending June 30, 1894 17,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

Abstract of contracts for improving Patchogue Rirer, N. Y., in force during the fiscal year

ending June 30, 1892.

Name and address of contract.

ors.

Date of con

tract.

Subject of contract.

Price.

Remarks.

E. Bailey & Sons, Patchogue, Apr. 18, 1891 Delivering riprap $2.80 per
N. Y.

and construct ton.

ing breakwater. Alonzo E. Smith, Islip, N. Y..

Dredging

. 20 per

yard.

Work completed Oct.

9, 1891. 3,002 tons

delivered and placed. Work completed Jan.

16, 1892. 16,265 cubio yards.

cubic

[blocks in formation]

The principal articles of commerce by water are coal, wood, brick, stone, lumber, oysters, and general merchandise.

“In addition to the above there are a number of improvements in the way of docks, dredging, etc., in progress, that are the direct result of the Government work that has been done at this place, and during the present year there will be more vessels run from our place, including one large freight steamer, which will probably add 30,000 tons to receipts and 20,000 tons to the shipments of this port.”

D 26.

IMPROVEMENT OF BROWNS CREEK, SAYVILLE, LONG ISLAND, NEW

YORK.

Browns Creek is a small stream flowing midway between the villages of Sayville and Bayport, near the south shore of Long Island, and emptying into Great South Bay, about 11 miles northeast of Fire Island Inlet. From Fire Island Inlet to the vicinity of Browns Creek there is a rather crooked channel of about 8 feet available depth. The original entrance to the creek was crooked, narrow, and shifting. Its depth at mean low water was about .4 foot. In the stream itself the low-water level was from 3 to 1.3 feet higher than low water in Great Sonth Bay and the channel depths from zero to 3 feet below low water in the bay. The width of the stream from the bay to the highway bridge, about 5,000 feet, averages 77 feet. Its course lies through a sandy marsh from one-quarter to one-half mile in width, separated from the bay by a low and narrow beach. In its natural condition this stream was not avallable for any purpose of navigation.

The permanent population of Sayville is said to be 3,500.

The mean rise of tide in Great South Bay is 1.1 feet; at the highway bridge, except in dry seasons, it is scarcely noticeable.

PROJECT FOR IMPROVEMENT.

In pursuance of the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, a survey of Browns Creek was made, the report on which was printed in House Ex. Doc. No. 22, Fifty-first Congress, first session, and also in

$9, 900

he Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1890, Part I, pages 669– 674. With this report plans and estimates for work were presented as follows: 6 The object of the desired improvement is to secure an anchorage ground or place where the fishing boats can lie in safety during rough weather. This can be accomplished by widening and deepening the creek and improving its mouth. To prevent the entrance from filling up by drift and wave action, jetties will probably be needed on both sides, certainly on the west side, as the drift of sand along the shore is from west to east. The jetties should be of riprap, the top and slopes to be of stone weighing not less than one-fourth ton, the top to be 3 feet wide, and 1 foot above high water, with slopes of 1 on 1. The stone on the top and slopes should be selected and carefully laid, so as to present as smooth a surface as possible to resist the action of the moving ice.

The cost of dredging a channel 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water, from the 6-foot curve in the bay up to the first bend in the creek (1,850 feet) is estimated to be: 33,000 cubic yards at 30 cents per cubic yard, the material to be deposited in

the bay.. For a 4-foot channel 100 feet wide above this point to the highway bridge,

4,680 feet, 86,000 cubic yards, at 14 cents per cubic yard, the material to be placed on the banks...

12,040 Cost of west jetty, 1,600 feet long, 3,700 cubic yards of riprap, at $2.50 per cubic yard.

9, 250 Cost of east jetty, 1,400 feet long, 3,100 cubic yards of riprap, at $2.50 per cubic yard

7,750 Contingencies..

7,060

46,000 The first work to be done should be the deepening at and near the mouth, and the construction of jetties, commencing at the shore end. These works should be carried on simultaneously.

This improvement would not only benefit those engaged in oystering and fishing, but would enable many articles of commerce to be brought to Sayville by water instead of by rail, as at present. A partial improvement would be of great benefit to small vessels.

The beginning of work under this project was approved by the Secretary of War, October 4, 1890, after the first appropriation for improv. ing Browns Creek had been made; work had not been begun up to July 1, 1891.

Total ......

OPERATIONS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1892.

Under date of April 18, 1891, a contract was entered into with E. Bailey & Sons, for construction of jetties at the mouth of the river, by delivering and placing riprap gneiss, at the rate of $2.80 per gross ton.

Work under this contract was begun August 25, 1891, and up to the close of the fiscal year 1,520 tons of riprap had been delivered and placed, building 492 linear feet of the west jetty and 275 linear feet of the east jetty, with an additional 175 feet partly completed. The contract has been extended; the unfinished part of the east jetty will be completed.

With approval of the Chief of Engineers, an agreement was made with Mr. Alonzo E. Smith to dredge and deepen the channel, at the rate of 20 cents per cubic yard, prism measurement. Dredging was begun October 2, 1891, and completed January 30, 1892, 23,194 cubic

yards of sand and mud being dredged and deposited upon adjacent banks, making a channel about 1,450 feet long, 100 feet wide, and 4 feet deep at mean low water, extending from deep water in Great South Bay about 1,150 feet inside the mouth of the creek.

PRESENT CONDITION OF IMPROVEMENT.

The west jetty is 492 feet long, and the east jetty is completed for 275 feet, with dimensions of 3 feet top width, at level of 1 foot above mean high water; the additional 175 feet of the east jetty are partly built.

The dredged channel has shoaled somewhat from wave action and from subsidence of the banks; it is now used by many of the small boats of the vicinity for night anchorage, and two arms have been dredged by private parties, extending into the east marsh, for similar use; the smaller of these is 25 feet wide, the larger 50 feet wide; their total length is about 1,500 feet. The boats using this channel are in general the small oyster sloops, owned and operated in the vicinity, with draft of 2 to 5 feet; it is reported that 115 of these vessels, by actual count, have taken shelter in the harbor at one time.

PROPOSED OPERATIONS.

With available funds the east jetty will be completed to a length of 450 feet.

Future appropriations will be applied to maintaining and extending the channel, and to completing the jetties, as contemplated in the project.

The only appropriation for improving Browns Creek is the one of $12,000, made by act of Congress approved September 19, 1890.

Browns Creek is in the collection district of New York.
The nearest light-house is at Fire Island Inlet, about 11 miles south west.

The nearest works of defense are the fortifications at Willets Point, New York, about 35 miles west, and Fort Hale, New Haven Harbor, Connecticut, about thó same distance northeastwardly.

Money statement.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$11, 929. 16 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

10, 457. 76 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 471.40 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$537.60 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

560.00

1,097.60 July 1, 1892, balance available ..

373. 80 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amonnt available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893...

5, 373. 80 Amount (estimated) reqnired for completion of existing project. 29,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in tiscal yoаrending June 30,1894 20,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

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