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Abstract of contracts for improring Browns Creek, New York, in force during the fiscal

year ending June 30, 1892.

Name and address of con.

tractor.

Date of con

Subject of contract. tract.

Price.

Remarks.

E. Bailey & Sons, Pat. A pri 18, 1891 Delivering riprap , $2.80 per ton.. ('ontract extended to chogue, N. Y.

and construc

July 1, 1892.

tion of jetties. Alonzo E. Smith,, Islip,

Dredging... 0.20 per cubic Work completed Jan. N. Y.

yard.

30, 1892, 23, 194 cubio yards.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1891.

Draft of vessels using harbor ...

.... feet.. from 2 to 5 Number of oyster boats and small vessels belonging in harbor

210 Amount of oysters taken during the year, hy vessels belonging in harbor

... bushels..

225, 000 Number of vessels (estimated) using harbor for shelter, or for night, which could not have used it before improvement.

..over.

200 Largest number of vessels observed at one time in the harbor.

115

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There were bronght into and planted in the Great South Bay, in the year 1891, by vessels harboring in this vicinity, according to careful information, 175,000 bushels of seed oysters from other oyster grounds.

There have been several oyster houses (establishments from which oysters are shipped in barrels) erected during the year in the vicinity of this improvement, which has become a center for this trade.

One establishment for hanling out upon railways and repairing boats has been set up near the improvement on a canal dug out for the purpose at private expense.

Proceedings are now pending for the opening and laying out of two public highways and landings for the more convenient approach and use of the improvement by the public. Yours, very respectfully,

JOSEPH WOOD, For the Village Improvement Society of Sayville, etc. To Col. D. C. HOUSTON,

Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army.

D 27.

ESTABLISHMENT OF HARBOR LINES AT FIVE-MILE RIVER HARBOR,

CONNECTICUT.

ROWAYTON, CONN., October 12, 1891. DEAR SIR: Will you kindly inforın me what course to pursue to establish harbor lines at this port? I ask for information for the people of this community, who feel that their rights to our small harbor are to be trespassed upon by some of the wharf owners along the water front. We have just finished the second Government appropriation for dredging October 9, which extends from the mouth up and near the center of the harbor. The first wharf in coming up the harbor is at a point making the harbor more narrow than elsewhere, I think about 300 feet in width. The wharf at this point is to be extended about 50 feet farther out in the harbor to avoid the expense of dredging and get more wharf, taking advantage of our citizens on the plea that we can not get harbor lines established, as we are not under a corporation. Capt. John McNeil, who has been for many years harbormaster at the port of Bridgeport, Conn., advised me to write to your honorable sir for information. Respectfully yours,

Capt. 0. S. YOUNG. Hon. REDFIELD PROCTOR,

Secretary of War.

[Third indorsement.)

ENGINEER OFFICE, U.S.ARMY,

New York, January 22, 1892. Respectfully returned to the Chief of Engineers with report of this date recommending the establishment of harbor lines at the harbor of Five-Mile River, Connecticut. Capt. Young and others interested have been consulted, and the lines proposed are generally satisfactory to them.

D. C. HOUSTON, Colonel, Corps of Engineers.

REPORT OF COLONEL D. C. HOUSTON, CORPS OF ENGINEERS.

ENGINEER OFFICE, U. S. ARMY,

Nero York, January 22, 1892. GENERAL: Referring to the accompanying letter of Capt. 0. S. Young, dated October 12, 1891, on the subject of harbor lines at the harbor of Five-Mile River, Connecticut, I have the honor to transmit a tracing* showing proposed harbor lines at that harbor, which I recommend for approval. The parties interested have been consulted and the lines indicated meet with general approval. They provide a sufficient waterway for general navigation and leave ample room for the construction of wharves. The bulkhead and pierhead lines are identical. Such lines are necessary for the preservation and protection of the harbor.

The project for improvement adopted in 1888 contemplates a channel 8 feet deep at mean low water, 100 feet wide and about 6,000 feet in length, from Long Island Sound to the head of the harbor as indicated on the tracing, at an estimated cost of $25,000. The sum of $10,000 has been appropriated and $9,886,94 expended, making a channel 8 feet deep at mean low water and 60 feet wide from Long Island Sound up the harbor for a distance of 2,400 feet. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. HOUSTON,

Colonel, Corps of Engineers. Brig. Gen. THOMAS L. CASEY,

Chief of Engineers, U. S. A.

* Not printed.

(First indorsement.)

OFFICE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

U. S. ARMY,

January 25, 1892. Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

The subject of the establishment of harbor lines in the harbor at Five-Mile River, Connecticut, having been brought to the attention of the Secretary of War, the matter was referred to Col. D. C. Houston, Corps of Engineers, the officer in charge of the district in which this locality is situated, for report.

Col. Houston submits report dated January 22, 1892, and recommends for the approval of the Secretary of War the harbor and dock lines mentioned in the within report and delineated upon the accompanying chart.

It is recommended that the lines selected be approved, and that the secretary place his approval both upon the report and the tracing submitted.

Thos. LINCOLN CASEY, Brig. Gen., Chief of Engineers.

(Second indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 26, 1892.

Approved.

L. A. GRANT, Acting Secretary of War.

APPENDIX E.

IMPROVEMENT OF HUDSON RIVER; OF HARBORS AT SAUGERTIES AND RONDOUT, AND WAPPINGER CREEK; OF NEW YORK HARBOR AND RIVERS AND HARBORS IN ITS VICINITY, NEW YORK; AND OF RARITAN BAY, NEW JERSEY.

REPORT OF LIEUTENANT-COLONEL G. L. GILLESPIE, CORPS OF ENGI. NEERS, OFFICER IN CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1892, WITH OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS.

IMPROVEMENTS.

1. Hudson River, New York.
2. Harbor at Saugerties, New York.
3. Harbor at Rondout, New York,
4. Wappinger Creek, New York.
5. Harlem River, New York.
6. East River and Hell Gate, New York.
7. Newtown Creek, New York.

8. Buttermilk Channel, New York Har

bor. 9. Gowanus Bay, New York. 10. New York Harbor, New York. 11. Raritan Bay, New Jersey, 12. Removing sunken vessels or craft ob

structing or endangering navigation.

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY.

13. For canal from main channel from Jamaica Bay easterly to Long Beach Inlet,

New York.

HARBOR LINES.

14. Establishment of harbor lines in New York Harbor and its adjacent waters.

ENGINEER OFFICE, U. S. ARMY,

New York, N. Y., July 9, 1892. GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit herewith annual reports for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, upon the works of river and harbor improvement under my charge. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. L. GILLESPIE,

Lieut. Col. of Engineers. Brig. Gen. THOMAS L. CASEY, Chief of Engineers, U. Á. A.

EI.

IMPROVEMENT OF HUDSON RIVER, NEW YORK. The Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1885, Part I, page 677, contains a history of this improvement accompanied by original reports and two sketches showing its condition at that time.

The only part of the Hudson River which has been improved by the General Government is a stretch, about 20 miles long, beginning at the head of navigation at Troy, N. Y., about 6 miles above Albany, and extending down the river to New Baltimore, about 14 miles below Albany.

While there has always been enough water below New Baltimore for navigation, this upper section of the river, so far as its history is known to us, has always been obstructed by bars and shoals, due to the existence of numerous islands and sloughs and the consequent diversion

the river's waters through too many channels. Prior to 1831, when the jurisdiction of the Federal Government over these waters was confirmed by judicial decision, the State of New York had made efforts to improve the navigation of this part of the river.

Since 1831 the improvement of the Hudson River has been conducted both by the State of New York and by the General Government, both building and repairing dikes and doing such dredging as seemed necessary. In the last few years, however, the dike work has been left almost exclusively to the General Government, and the dredging to the State of New York.

The general system of improvement has been the same throughoutthe contraction of the channels by the construction of jetties and dikes intended to deepen them by means of the scour so produced, and also the lowering of the bed by dredging where such work was indispensable.

But up to 1831 the work, which had consisted almost entirely of the construction of spur dikes and dredging, had produced very little permanent improvement.

After 1831, however, the United States began the present general system of improvement, which consists of contracting the channel by means of longitudinal dikes intended to aid in scouring the bars and shoals, instead of which spur jetties had formerly been used.

Under this system the United States constructed two dikes in 1835, 1836, 1837, and 1838.

Then followed a long interval of time in which nothing was done by the United States except in 1852; but in 1863 the State of New York took up the improvement on the general plan adopted by the United States in 1831, viz, substituting a system of longitudinal dikes instead of the jetty system, and between 1863 and 1867 built six important longitudinal dikes of this kind. (Annual Report of 1885, page 678.)

The work was again taken up by the United States in 1864, when, out of the general sum appropriated for river and harbor improvements, $33,000 was allotted for the Hudson River improvement, and this was followed by the act of June 23, 1866, which appropriated $50,000 for the same work.

The plans under which the present works of improvement of the river are conducted were adopted in 1866, and provide for securing a navigable channel 11 feet deep at mean low water from New Baltimore up to Albany, and 9 feet deep at mean low water from Albany up to Troy.

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