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July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$19, 901.35 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

18, 491. 20 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 410. 15 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

20,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

21, 410. 15 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project......

35, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 10.)

11. Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut.This harbor consists of a bay partly sheltered by Fayerweather Island, and of two small streams extending inland from the head of the bay. The depth in Cedar Creek, the more important of these streams, was from 2 to 4 feet at mean low water, and the channel was narrow and very crooked.

The project for improvement submitted in 1883, including dredging a channel 3,300 feet long, 80 feet wide, and 6 feet deep, to extend up Cedar Creek, and a breakwater from Fayerweather Island to the mainland. The estimated cost was $80,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, the breakwater had been built to the full length, but not to the width and height projected.

The proposed channel had been carried up to the head of the harbor, but with less width in places than the project required. The channel was, however, largely used, and was indispensable to the commerce of the upper part of the harbor.

During the past fiscal year the channel has been repaired, maintained, and slightly widened. It is now practically of the dimensions required by the project.

Future appropriations should be applied to maintaining and extending the channel, and to enlargement of the breakwater as becomes necessary. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$5, 117.38 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

4,711.75 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

405. 63 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .

5, 405. 63 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ....... 35,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 11.)

12. Norwalk Harbor, Connecticut.-This harbor consists of the tidal part of Norwalk River, extending from Norwalk, Conn., to the river's mouth, a distance of about 3 miles. South Norwalk is on the west bank of the river, about 1} miles below Norwalk. Originally the depth up to South Norwalk was about 5 feet at mean low water; between there and Norwalk the river bed ran nearly bare.

The first project for improvement contemplated a channel 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep to Norwalk. In 1881 the project was modified to provide for a depth of 8 feet below South Norwalk. The last estimate upon this work placed the cost from commencement at $84,000.

Some parts of the river have required dredging several times.

Up to July 1, 1891, the channel had been made 100 feet wide and 8 feet deep up to South Norwalk, and thence to Norwalk 6 feet deep and

from 60 to 100 feet wide; it was in fair condition, but had narrowed slightly from washing in at the sides.

This channel was constantly used by the commerce of Norwalk and South Norwalk, to which it was indispensable.

During the past fiscal year dredging was done to repair and maintain the existing channels, and they now have the full depths and widths above mentioned.

The project for this improvement is practically completed; dredging will be needed in small amounts from time to time to maintain the channels.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$4, 767. 21 Jun 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4,583, 68 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

183.53 (See Appendix D 12.)

13. Wilsons Point Harbor, Connecticut.—This harbor is a bay on the north shore of Long Island Sound, sheltered from all storms except southerly ones. Its natural depth of 16 feet at the mouth shoaled to about 5 feet at low water at the wharves of the New England Terminal Company, a corporation formed to secure water privileges for the Housatonic Railroad system and its connections.

In 1888 $25,000 was appropriated for this improvement as a part of Norwalk Harbor, and a project was adopted for making a channel 300 feet wide and 15 feet deep up to the vicinity of the wharves. The required depth was secured, with width of 400 feet.

In 1890 $30,000 was appropriated for this harbor, and up to July 1, 1891, with a total expenditure of $36,814.21, the channel up to the vicinity of the wharves had been made 15 feet deep at mean low water, and 480 feet wide, with an additional width of 200 feet for 750 feet on the east side near the wharves. This permitted vessels of 15 feet draft to approach the wharves at any ordinary stage of the tide.

During the past fiscal year the channel below the wharves has been further widened by about 220 feet, and a basin has been dredged 200 feet wide and about 1,300 feet long on the west side of the wharves, affording room for vessels to approach that side.

No further public improvement at this harbor is needed, and no further appropriation is required. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$18, 215. 69 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

9, 881.99 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

8, 333. 70 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

6, 212. 87 July 1, 1892, balance available

2, 120.83 (See Appendix D 13.)

14. Five Mile River Harbor, Connecticut.This harbor is a small inlet over a mile long, and from 300 to 800 feet wide, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. The natural low-water depth at the mouth is about 3 feet, shoaling to zero half way up the harbor.

The project for improvement proposed in a report on a survey maile in 1886, and adopted under an appropriation of $5,000, made August 11, 1888, provides for dredging a channel 8 feet deep at mean loir water, 100 feet wide, and about 6,000 feet long, extending to the heal of the harbor; the cost was estimated at $25,000.

The total amount appropriated for this improvement is $15,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, $4,873.13 had been expended, and a channel 50 feet wide and 1,500 feet long had been dredged, 8 feet deep at mean low water, extending from deep water in Long Island Sound up the harbor. This was used by vessels entering the harbor, but was not extended far enough to afford access to the wharves.

During the past fiscal year the channel has been widened to 60 feet, and extended about 950 feet farther up the harbor, opposite the lower wharves. Private channels have been dredged to these wharves, and the improvement is now used for bringing vessels to the wharves, which previously could not have landed.

Future appropriations will be applied to widening and extending the channel as projected. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$5, 126. 87 June 30, 1892, a mount expended during fiscal year..

5, 013. 83 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended...,

113. 04 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ......

5, 113.04 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 10,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 14.)

15. Stamford Harbor, Connecticut.—This harbor consists of a bay on the north shore of Long Island Sound, and of the tidal part, about three-quarters of a mile long, of Mill River. The original depth in this part of the river at mean low water was from 1 to 3 feet, gradually increasing in the bay to a depth of 12 feet.

The project for improvement proposed in 1883, and adopted in 1886, provides for dredging a channel 80 feet wide and 5 feet deep at mean low water from the bay to the head of the harbor, at an estimated cost of $20,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, $17,549.02 had been expended in making the channel 80 feet wide or more, for over half its proposed length, and 50 feet wide for the rest of the distance. The improvement admitted of using vessels of greater draft than formerly.

During the past fiscal year the channel was widened at the principal bends, and in the upper part of the harbor, making about 70 feet width nearly to the head of the harbor.

The project is now regarded as completed, further width at the head of the harbor not being immediately necessary. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$3, 287. 18 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

3, 226. 45 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

60. 73 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

15, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

15, 060. 73 (See Appendix D 15.)

16. Port Chester Harbor, Nero York.—This harbor consists of a bay opening into Long Island Sound at the mouth of Byram River, and of the lower part of the river itself, which is navigable for about a mile above its mouth.

The original available depth in the river was not more than a foot at low water, and Salt Rock in the river and Sunken Rock in the bay were considered dangerous obstructions.

The project for improvement, adopted in 1871, provided for the removal of these rocks to 9 and 11 feet depth, respectively, and for the construction of a breakwater at Byram Point, at the mouth of the har. bor, the estimated cost being $96,632.

In 1884 the project was extended to provide for dredging a channel 24 feet deep and from 60 to 100 feet wide from the bay to the vicinity of the village wharves.

In 1888 the project was further modified to omit the removal of Sunken Rock, and to build a breakwater from that rock to Byram Point, which should also serve as a beacon on the rock. A revised estimate, made in 1890 in accordance with the modification, reduced the cost of completion by about $40,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, $30,941.13 had been expended in removing Salt Rock to 9 feet depth, in dredging a channel 24 feet deep and from 60 to 100 feet wide to within 150 feet of Port Chester Bridge, with 25 feet width to the bridge, and 585 linear feet of the breakwater from Sunken Rock to Byram Point were constructed.

The dredging and rock removal have resulted in admitting safely vessels of greater draft than formerly. The partial completion of the breakwater has served to mark Sunken Rock and to shelter a small anchorage area at the mouth of the river.

During the past fiscal year nothing has been done. The previous improvements remain in good condition.

Future appropriations will be applied to completing the breakwater, and to maintaining or enlarging the dredged channel. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$1, 058. 69 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

446. 67 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended ...

612. 02 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

5, 612.02 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 15,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 16.) 17. Larchmont Harbor, New York.This is a bay about half a mile wide and extending three-quarters of a mile inland, with depths gradually diminishing from 18 feet at and near the mouth. The mouth of the bay was obstructed by two rocks (Umbrella Rock and Huron Rock), always covered, and owing to its width the harbor anchorage was little protected from easterly and southerly storms.

A survey was ordered by Congress in 1888, and afterwards a project was adopted for connecting Umbrella Rock with the west shore, and Huron Rock with the east shore by riprap breakwaters, which would sufficiently mark the rocks and would cover the harbor. The estimated cost of the project was $105,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, 84,619.05 had been expended in constructing 74 linear feet of Umbrella breakwater, and 64 linear feet of Huron break, water, the location being over the rocks. The breakwaters serve to mark the rocks, but are not long enough to afford any appreciable shelter.

No work has been done during the past fiscal year.

Future appropriations should be applied to completing the breakwaters.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$414, 28 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

293. 33 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

120.95 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 100,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 17.)

18. Echo Harbor, New Rochelle, Nero York.The channel of this harbor was obstructed by two ledges, Start Rock and Sheepshead Reef, the former bare at low water, the latter covered to a depth of about a foot.

The project for improvement, adopted in 1875, provided for the removal of these rocks to 7 and 9 feet depth, respectively. The estimated cost was $38,955.38.

Twenty-two thousand dollars has been appropriated for this harbor, all of which has been expended.

Start Rock has been wholly removed to 7 feet depth, Sheepshead Reef partly removed to 9 feet depth, and a narrow channel has also been dredged up the harbor.

The removal of Start Rock and the channel dredging improved the approaches to the wharves. The work done upon Sheepshead Reef is of little use until the whole reef is removed.

During the past fiscal year nothing has been done. Future appropriations should be applied to removing the remainder of Sheepshead Reef.

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... $17,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 18.)

19. East Chester Creek, New York.This is a small tidal stream, emptying into Pelham Bay. It was navigable at high tide only for vessels drawing 7 feet up to Lockwood, a distance of 24 miles. The rise of tide is 7.1 feet.

The project for improvement, adopted in 1872, and subsequently modified, provided for a channel 9 feet deep at mean high water, extending to a point 3,000 feet above Lockwood, and terminating at the upper end in a tidal basin. Part of the lower course of the channel was to be protected by dikes, and the whole work was estimated to cost $221,000.

In 1891 this estimate was revised and reduced by omitting the dikes, which seemed unnecessary for maintenance of channels, making the total estimate of cost from beginning $124,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, $64,000 had been appropriated for this improvement, of which' $56,858.97 had been expended in dredging and rock removal to make a channel 9 feet deep at high water (2 feet at low water), with width of 125 feet to the head of Goose Island, one-half mile from the mouth of the creek; thence to Town Dock, with width of 100 feet; thence to Lockwood, with nearly the same width. Above Town Dock 1,235 linear feet of diking was built to sustain the sides of the channel. The increased depth and straighter courses resulting have been of benefit to the commerce at Town Dock and Lockwood.

No work was done during the past fiscal year.

A lay-out for the channel above Lockwood was surveyed in 1889, and an effort was then made to obtain consent of owners to the depositing of material to be dredged upon the adjacent marsh lands. This consent

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