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has finally been obtained, and dredging with available funds is proposed as soon as the drawbridge at Lockwood can be put in working · order.

Future appropriations should be applied to completing the proposed cut above Lockwood and to repairing and maintaining previously dredged channels. A revised estimate, submitted with the last annual report, places the cost of completing this work at $55,000. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$7, 141. 03 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

7,141.03 S Amount (estimated required for completion of existing project...... 55,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 19.)

20. Greenport Harbor, New York.—This harbor, at the eastern end of Long Island, is exposed to easterly storms; its anchorage ground, which was sheltered by Joshua Point, has materially shoaled by the erosion of the point, and by the influx of drifting sand.

The project of improvement, adopted in 1882, provided for the con. struction of a riprap breakwater extending from Joshua Point 1,700 feet in a southeasterly course to arrest drifting sand, to check the erosion of the point, and to increase the sheltered area. Its cost was estimated at $46,000.

In 1890 the project was modified to provide for increasing the height of the breakwater from 3 to 5 feet above high water, instead of extend. ing it, and to apply the rest of the estimated amount for completion to dredging and enlarging the anchorage basin.

Up to July 1, 1891, $35,000 had been appropriated to this improvement, and $32,047.20 expended in building 1,570 linear feet of breakwater, and partly increasing the height. The effect has been to check the erosion of Joshua Point, and to afford complete shelter to the inner part of the harbor.

During the past fiscal year the work of increasing the height of the breakwater was completed; dredging was done to increase the sheltered area of 9 feet depth by about 13 acres, and an entrance channel to Stirling Basin, at the head of the harbor, was dredged 40 feet wide and 6 feet deep to provide access to the winter anchorage ground there.

Future appropriations will be applied to dredging, to increase the area of sheltered anchorage. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$4,505, 85 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

4, 312.94 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

192.91 · Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

11, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 .

11, 192.91 (See Appendix D 20.)

21. Harbor of Port Jefferson Inlet, Nero York.–This harbor is a large and deep inland bay, with a narrow entrance or inlet, outside of which was originally a shoal with 3 feet depth at low water. The location ot the inlet is one of the most exposed on Long Island Sound.

Under a project adopted in 1871, and moditied in 1873 and 1877, an east jetty 1,390 feet long, and a west jetty 940 feet long, were built, both with scant cross section, and a channel 8 feet deep and 100 feet wide was dredged through the bar. The work was completed in 1883, at a total cost of $79,000.

By order of Congress an examination of Port Jefferson Inlet was

made in 1888, and subsequently a project was adopted for repairing and enlarging the jetties and dredging to make the channel 10 feet deep and 200 feet wide, at an estimated cost of $90,000.

Under the existing project, up to July 1, 1891, $2,662.18 (including outstanding liabilities) had been expended in raising and enlarging a part of the east jetty; the effect has been to increase the shelter at the inlet.

During the past fiscal year both jetties were further enlarged, and a contract was entered into for dredging between them, which is still in progress, a small amount of work only being yet done.

With the funds now available the channel will be made 10 feet deep and about 100 feet wide, under a contract now in operation.

Future appropriations will be applied to dredging and enlarging jetties. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$25,047.89 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

14, 949. 11 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

10, 098. 78 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

9591.27 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.. 8, 108. 73

8, 700.00 July 1, 1892, balance available

1, 398. 78 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.....

11, 398. 78 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 55,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 21.)

22. Huntington Harbor, New York.—This is a tidal inlet extending southward from Huntington Bay to the village of Huntington. It is about 2 miles long, quite narrow, and landlocked, and has a natural available depth of nearly 8 feet at mean low water, up to within threefourths mile of the head of the harbor, where the low-water depth shoaled gradually to zero.

In 1872–73 a channel 8 feet deep and 150 feet wide was dredged in the upper part of the harbor by the United States at a cost of $22,500. Within ten years following this had nearly filled up.

In 1884 a survey was ordered by Congress, and subsequently a proj. ect for improvement was adopted, providing for re-dredging a channel 8 feet deep and 100 feet wide up to the upper wharves, at an estimated cost of $42,000. The estimate also includes a pile protection for part of the channel.

July 1, 1891, a contract for dredging had been entered into, but work had not been begun.

During the past fiscal year a channel 8 feet deep at mean low water, 90 feet wide and about 2,900 feet long, has been dredged from deep water nearly to the upper wharves of the harbor, making these wharves accessible to vessels of inoderate draft at all stages of tide.

Future appropriations will be applied to dredging to widen the channel, and to maintenance of the channel already dredged. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$9, 895. 60 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

9, 486.39 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

409. 21 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5, 000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

5, 409.21

ENG 926

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... $17,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 22.)

23. Glen Core Harbor, New York.—This harbor is an inlet on the east side of Hempstead Bay, which is accessible only at high tide, and a breakwater was needed to shelter vessels while at anchor waiting for tides.

The project for improvement, adopted in 1888, provides for a riprap breakwater about 2,500 feet long, extending in a west-southwesterly direction from the northwest corner of the Glen Cove Dock, the top to be 5 feet wide and 3 feet above mean high water, and slopes to be i on 1. Its estimated cost was $201,960.

Up to July 1, 1891, 824 linear feet of breakwater had been built at a cost of $22,788.23, affording a small area of shelter in shoal water close to the landing

During the past fiscal year the breakwater was extended 232 feet farther, making its total length 1,056 feet. The cross section has been made less than designed for permanency to allow of securing more shelter with the available funds.

The project provides for about 1,450 feet extension of the breakwater, which will be built as funds for the purpose are appropriated. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended .

$14, 739. 30 June 30, 1892, amount expended during tiscal year.

14, 501.93 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended..

237, 37 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

16.00 July 1, 1892, balance available....

221. 37 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

10,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending Jue 30, 1893.

10, 221. 37

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... 156, 960. OC Submitteil in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 23.)

2. Flushing Bay, New York.-Before improvement, the available depth in this broad shallow bay and in the channel leading up to Flushing was less than 4 feet at mean low water.

The project for improvement, adopted in 1879, contemplated building 16,700 feet of diking to form a tidal basin, which, by filling and discharging through the main channel, would maintain a channel depth of 6 feet or more at mean low water, after once dredging; the bottom is soft mud. The estimated cost of this work was $173,500.

In 1888 the project was modified to omit part of the diking, which then appeared unnecessary, and in 1891, at the request of many citizens, the extension of dikes was wholly omitted from the project.

Up to July 1, 1891, $89,612.08 had been expended in building 4,663 linear feet of diking, and in dredging and redredging to make and maintain a channel of 6 feet depth at mean low water. The channel is of great use to the commerce of the bay; it will probably require annual dredging to maintain it.

During the past fiscal year 73,849 cubic yards of mud was removed, making a 6-foot channel 90 feet wide and about 5,200 feet long; the depth actually made was somewhat greater, to allow for filling in.

It is proposed to apply future appropriations to il: alging, to maintain and widen the 6 foot channel.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$15,500.02 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

15, 217. 38 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

282.64 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

10,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

10, 282.64 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project .... 58,500.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 24.)

25. Patchogue River, New York.—This is a shallow tidal inlet extending about a mile northward from the shore of Great South Bay, Long Island, to the village of Patchogue. The natural depth in the stream and over a bar at the mouth was from 2 to 3 feet at mean low water, and the rise of tide is about 1 foot.

In 1880, and again in 1886, examinations were made by order of Congress, and subsequently a project was adopted for making a channel, 6 feet deep at mean low water and 60 feet wide, up to the village wharves, to be protected at the mouth by a jetty on the west side, at an estimated cost of $40,000.

Up to July 1, 1891, $1,541.18 (including outstanding liabilities) had been expended in building 150 linear feet of the shore end of the jetty.

During the past fiscal year 1,190 linear feet of the jetty were built, making its length 1,340 feet; and a channel, 6 feet deep and 50 feet wide, was dredged from deep water in Great South Bay to and inside the entrance to the river; this channel will require partial redredging to make it permanent. It does not yet extend far enough up the river to be of great use to navigation.

Future appropriations will be applied mainly to dredging. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$14, 843. 82 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

13, 584.83 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

1, 258.99 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

77.37 July 1, 1892, balance available

1, 181.62 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892..

8,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ...

9, 181. 62 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project. 17,000.00 Subinitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 25.)

26. Browns Creck, Sayville, New York.—This is a narrow stream extending northward from Great South Bay to the Sayville highway bridge, above which it is wholly a fresh-water creek. The natural depth in the creek is from 1 to 3 feet at low tide, and on a bar at the mouth it is less than 1 foot.

A survey was made by order of Congress in 1889, and a project was adopted for making the creek 10) feet wide and 4 feet deep at mean low water, the entrance channel to be protected by riprap jetties on either side, at a total estimated cost of $46,000.

The total amount appropriated for this work is $17,000.

July 1, 1891, a contract had been entered into for commencing the jetties but work had not been begun.

During the past fiscal year 492 feet of the west jetty was built and

450 feet of the east jetty partly built, under a contract not yet completed.

A channel 100 feet. wide and 4 feet deep at mean low water was dredged from deep water in Great South Bay, extending between the jetties and up the stream; the total length of channel is 1,450 feet, and total amount dredged 23,194 cubic yards. In addition, private channels have been dredged into the marsh on the east side of the main channel, with width of 25 and 50 feet and aggregate length of 1,500 feet.

Prior to 1891 this creek was of nő value for purposes of navigation, It is now quite extensively used by boats engaged in oystering, etc.

Future appropriations will be applied to maintaining and extending the dredged channel and to such repairs and extension of the jetties as become necessary, July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$11,929. 16 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

10, 457. 76 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 471. 40 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$537. 60 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

560.00

1,097.60 July 1, 1892, balance available ...

373. 80 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ...

5, 373. 80 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 29, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

narbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix D 26.)

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IMPROVEMENT OF HUDSON RIVER; OF HARBORS AT SAUGERTIES

AND RONDOUT, AND WAPPINGER CREEK; OF NEW YORK HARBOR
AND RIVERS AND HARBORS IN ITS VICINITY, NEW YORK; AND OF
RARITAN BAY, NEW JERSEY.

Officer in charge, Lieut. Col. G. L. Gillespie, Corps of Engineers, having under his immediate orders Lieut. Harry Taylor, Corps of Engi. neers, to November 2, 1891, and Lieut. James G. Warren, Corps of Engineers, since August 12, 1891.

1. Hudson River, New York. The improvement of this river has been restricted by the wording of the appropriation acts to that part of it lying between Troy, at the head of navigation, 6 miles above Albany, and New Baltimore, about 14 miles below Albany.

Before the improvement was begun the navigable depth in the channel between New Baltimore and Albany was 74 feet at mean low water; between Albany and Troy, 4 feet.

The mean range of tides at State dam at Troy is 0.80 feet; at Albany, 2.32 feet; and at New Baltimore, 3.42 feet.

The plan of improvement adopted in 1867 proposed making the navigable depth between New Baltimore and Albany 11 feet, and between Albany and Troy 9 feet. This was to be accomplished by the construction of longitudinal dikes to direct the currents, and by dredging.

The estimated cost of making this improvement, prepared in 1882, subject to be increased annually, was $1,078,304. In 1889 the estimated cost was $1,424,435.

The amount expended to June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $1,162,011.70, of which sum a large part has, however, from

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